A History of Continental Criminal Law - Primary Source Edition


Author: Ludwig von Bar
Publisher: Nabu Press
ISBN: 9781295616657
Category:
Page: 626
View: 4383
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ++++ The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to ensure edition identification: ++++ A History Of Continental Criminal Law; Volume 6 Of Continental Legal History Series Ludwig von Bar Thomas Sydney Bell Little, Brown and Co., 1916 Comparative law; Criminal law; Law


    • Crime

Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology

Official Organ of the American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Crime
Page: N.A
View: 7156


    • History

A History of Italian Law


Author: Carlo Calisse
Publisher: Beard Books
ISBN: 9781587981104
Category: History
Page: 500
View: 3928
These two volumes capture the vicissitudes of Italian public and private law from their antecedents in the Dark Ages to their realization in more modern times.


An Historical Introduction to Modern Civil Law


Author: Thomas Glyn Watkin
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351958917
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 1663
The civil law systems of continental Europe, Latin America and other parts of the world, including Japan, share a common legal heritage derived from Roman law. However, it is an inheritance which has been modified and adapted over the centuries as a result of contact with Germanic legal concepts, the work of jurists in the mediaeval universities, the growth of the canon law of the western Church, the humanist scholarship of the Renaissance and the rationalism of the natural lawyers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This volume provides a critical appreciation of modern civilian systems by examining current rules and structures in the context of their 2,500 year development. It is not a narrative history of civil law, but an historical examination of the forces and influences which have shaped the form and the content of modern codes, as well as the legislative and judicial processes by which they are created are administered.

    • Law

Roman Law and the Origins of the Civil Law Tradition


Author: George Mousourakis
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319122681
Category: Law
Page: 328
View: 7634
This unique publication offers a complete history of Roman law, from its early beginnings through to its resurgence in Europe where it was widely applied until the eighteenth century. Besides a detailed overview of the sources of Roman law, the book also includes sections on private and criminal law and procedure, with special attention given to those aspects of Roman law that have particular importance to today's lawyer. The last three chapters of the book offer an overview of the history of Roman law from the early Middle Ages to modern times and illustrate the way in which Roman law furnished the basis of contemporary civil law systems. In this part, special attention is given to the factors that warranted the revival and subsequent reception of Roman law as the ‘common law’ of Continental Europe. Combining the perspectives of legal history with those of social and political history, the book can be profitably read by students and scholars, as well as by general readers with an interest in ancient and early European legal history. The civil law tradition is the oldest legal tradition in the world today, embracing many legal systems currently in force in Continental Europe, Latin America and other parts of the world. Despite the considerable differences in the substantive laws of civil law countries, a fundamental unity exists between them. The most obvious element of unity is the fact that the civil law systems are all derived from the same sources and their legal institutions are classified in accordance with a commonly accepted scheme existing prior to their own development, which they adopted and adapted at some stage in their history. Roman law is both in point of time and range of influence the first catalyst in the evolution of the civil law tradition.

    • American literature

The Publishers' Trade List Annual


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American literature
Page: N.A
View: 1997
Includes authors, titles, subjects.

    • Law

Natural Law in Court


Author: R. H. Helmholz
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674504615
Category: Law
Page: 284
View: 4671
Natural-law theory grounds human laws in universal truths of God’s creation. The task of the judicial system was to build an edifice of positive law on natural law’s foundations. R. H. Helmholz shows how lawyers and judges made and interpreted natural law arguments in the West, and concludes that historically it has advanced the cause of justice.

    • History

Prosecuting Crime in the Renaissance

England, Germany, France
Author: John H. Langbein
Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
ISBN: 1584775777
Category: History
Page: 321
View: 1334
Our present system of criminal prosecution originated in England in the sixteenth century. Langbein traces its development, which was at its most intense during the reign of Queen Mary. He shows how the common law developed a system of official investigation and prosecution that incorporated the medieval institution of the jury trial. He places equal emphasis on the role of the justices of the peace as public prosecutors. The second half of the book compares the English system with those of the Holy Roman Empire (Germany) and France. He concludes by refuting the popular opinion that the English were strongly indebted to continental models. "This is an excellent work of scholarship, exhibiting wide research, erudition and analytical ability." --Joseph H. Smith, Harvard Law Review 88 (1974-1975) 485 JOHN LANGBEIN is Sterling Professor of Law and Legal History at Yale Law School. He has held academic positions at Stanford University, Oxford University, the Max-Planck-Institut fur Europaische Rechtsgeschichte and the Max-Planck-Institut fur Auslandisches und Internationales Strafrecht. Langbein is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the International Academy of Comparative Law, the International Association of Procedure Law, and other organizations in the fields of legal history and comparative law. Some of his most distinguished publications and articles include History of the Common Law: The Development of Anglo-American Legal Institutions (2009), Torture and the Law of Proof: Europe and England in the Ancient Regime (1977), and "The Supreme Court Flunks Trusts," Supreme Court Review (1991)."

    • Law

Crime, Procedure and Evidence in a Comparative and International Context

Essays in Honour of Professor Mirjan Damaska
Author: John Jackson,Maximo Langer
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1847314627
Category: Law
Page: 462
View: 5573
This book aims to honour the work of Professor Mirjan Damaška, Sterling Professor of Law at Yale Law School and a prominent authority for many years in the fields of comparative law, procedural law, evidence, international criminal law and Continental legal history. Professor Damaška 's work is renowned for providing new frameworks for understanding different legal traditions. To celebrate the depth and richness of his work and discuss its implications for the future, the editors have brought together an impressive range of leading scholars from different jurisdictions in the fields of comparative and international law, evidence and criminal law and procedure. Using Professor Damaška's work as a backdrop, the essays make a substantial contribution to the development of comparative law, procedure and evidence. After an introduction by the editors and a tribute by Harold Koh, Dean of Yale Law School, the book is divided into four parts. The first part considers contemporary trends in national criminal procedure, examining cross-fertilisation and the extent to which these trends are resulting in converging practices across national jurisdictions. The second part explores the epistemological environment of rules of evidence and procedure. The third part analyses human rights standards and the phenomenon of hybridisation in transnational and international criminal law. The final part of the book assesses Professor Damaška 's contribution to comparative law and the challenges faced by comparative law in the twenty first century.


Improperly Obtained Evidence in Anglo-American and Continental Law


Author: Dimitrios Giannoulopoulos
Publisher: Hart Publishing
ISBN: 9781849463829
Category:
Page: 296
View: 2050
This is the first book to offer an extensive cosmopolitan, cross-cultural, insight into the perennial controversy over the use of improperly obtained evidence in criminal trials. It challenges the conventional view that exclusionary rules are idiosyncratic of Anglo-American law, and highlights the 'constitutionalisation' and 'internationalisation' of criminal evidence and procedure as a cause of rapprochement (or divergence) beyond the Anglo-American and Continental law divide. Analysis focuses on confessional evidence and evidence obtained by search and seizure, telephone interceptions and other means of electronic surveillance. The law of England and Wales, France, Greece and the United States are systematically compared and contrasted throughout this study, but, where appropriate, analysis extends to other Anglo-American and Continental legal systems, including Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Portugal and international criminal courts. The book reviews exclusionary rules vis-à-vis the operation of judicial discretion, and explores the normative justifications that underpin them. It attempts to reinvigorate the idea of excluding evidence to protect constitutional or human rights (the rights thesis), arguing that there is significant scope for Anglo-American and Continental legal systems to place a renewed emphasis on it, particularly in relation to confessional evidence obtained in violation of custodial interrogation rights; we can locate an emerging rapprochement, and unique potential for ECHR jurisprudence to build consensus, in this respect. In marked contrast, remaining divergence with regards to evidence obtained by privacy violations means there is little momentum to adopt a reinvigorated rights thesis more widely.


    • Monographic series

Books in Series


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Monographic series
Page: N.A
View: 6733