• History

A Journey Into Florida Railroad History


Author: Gregg M. Turner
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 283
View: 7412
Meticulously researched and richly illustrated--including many never-before-published images--A Journey into Florida Railroad History is a comprehensive, authoritative history of the subject. Written by one of the nation's foremost authorities on Florida railroads, it explores all the key players and companies, and every significant period of development. This engaging and lively story will be savored and enjoyed by generations to come.

    • History

A Short History of Florida Railroads


Author: Gregg Turner
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439642540
Category: History
Page: 160
View: 4625
Florida's railroad heritage began in the 1830s amidst Native American upheaval and territorial colonization. Surpassing waterways as the primary mode of transport, the "Iron Horse" linked practically every town and city, carried tourists and locals, and ably conveyed the wealth of Florida's mines, factories, forests, groves, and farms. Nearly 175 years later, railroads still remain a dependable source of transport within the Sunshine State.

    • History

The Florida Land Boom of the 1920s


Author: Gregg M. Turner
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786499192
Category: History
Page: 192
View: 2639
During the Roaring Twenties, millions of Americans moved to the Sunshine State seeking quick riches in real estate. Many made fortunes; others returned home penniless. Within a few years there were thousands of residential subdivisions. Palatial estates, inviting apartment buildings and impressive commercial complexes were built. Opulent theaters and imposing churches opened, along with hundreds of municipal projects. A unique architectural theme emerged, today known as Mediterranean Revival. Railways and highways saw a renaissance. New cities--Boca Raton, Hollywood-by-the-Sea, Venice--were built from scratch and dozens of existing communities like St. Petersburg, Fort Lauderdale and Orlando were forever transformed by the speculative fever. Florida has experienced numerous land booms but none more sweeping than that of the 1920s. This illuminating account details how one of the greatest migration and development episodes in American history originated, exploded and eventually collapsed.

    • Transportation

Roads Through the Everglades

The Building of the Ingraham Highway, the Tamiami Trail and Conners Highway, 1914-1931
Author: Bruce D. Epperson
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 147666479X
Category: Transportation
Page: 284
View: 5076
In 1915, the road system in south Florida had changed little since before the Civil War. Travelling from Miami to Ft. Myers meant going through Orlando, 250 miles north of Miami. Within 15 years, three highways were dredged and blasted through the Everglades: Ingraham Highway from Homestead, 25 miles south of Miami, to Flamingo on the tip of the peninsula; Tamiami Trail from Miami to Tampa; and Conners Highway from West Palm Beach to Okeechobee City. In 1916, Florida's road commission spent $967. In 1928 it spent $6.8 million. Tamiami Trail, originally projected to cost $500,000, eventually required $11 million. These roads were made possible by the 1920s Florida land boom, the advent of gasoline and diesel-powered equipment to replace animal and steam-powered implements, and the creation of a highway funding system based on fuel taxes. This book tells the story of the finance and technology of the first modern highways in the South.



    • History

Railroads in the African American Experience

A Photographic Journey
Author: Theodore Kornweibel
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 557
View: 3993
Surveys the African American railroad experience, from the work of slaves who laid rail and the activism of the famous Pullman Porters to the lives of current black railroad employees and passengers.

    • History

Finding Florida

The True History of the Sunshine State
Author: T. D. Allman
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 0802120768
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 1455
Offers a comprehensive look at the history of the state of Florida, from its discovery, exploration, and settlement through its becoming a state, to notable events in the early twenty-first century.

    • Transportation

Train

Riding the Rails That Created the Modern World-from the Trans-Siberian to the Southwest Chief
Author: Tom Zoellner
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698151399
Category: Transportation
Page: 384
View: 2290
An epic and revelatory narrative of the most important transportation technology of the modern world In his wide-ranging and entertaining new book, Tom Zoellner—coauthor of the New York Times–bestselling An Ordinary Man—travels the globe to tell the story of the sociological and economic impact of the railway technology that transformed the world—and could very well change it again. From the frigid trans-Siberian railroad to the antiquated Indian Railways to the Japanese-style bullet trains, Zoellner offers a stirring story of this most indispensable form of travel. A masterful narrative history, Train also explores the sleek elegance of railroads and their hypnotizing rhythms, and explains how locomotives became living symbols of sex, death, power, and romance.

    • Photography

West Palm Beach

1893 to 1950
Author: Lynn Lasseter Drake,Richard A. Marconi,Historical Society of Palm Beach County
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439633479
Category: Photography
Page: 128
View: 5505
West Palm Beach was established in 1894, two decades after pioneers first arrived in the wilderness at Lake Worth. In 1893, Henry M. Flagler, Standard Oil magnate and Florida railroad mogul, finalized plans to extend his Florida East Coast Railroad south in order to turn Palm Beach into a winter playground for the rich. He designed West Palm Beach as the mainland commercial and residential support for his new resort. From its humble beginnings, it has become Palm Beach County's largest city and the seat of government. The city has suffered fires, hurricanes, boom times, and hard times, always emerging triumphantly. This installment of West Palm Beach's fascinating story shares its unique settlement and growth through the end of World War II.

    • Juvenile Fiction

A Land Remembered


Author: Patrick D. Smith
Publisher: Pineapple Press Inc
ISBN: 9781561642243
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 200
View: 4390
Traces the story of the MacIvey family of Florida from 1858 to 1968.

    • Social Science

Brotherhoods of Color

Black Railroad Workers and the Struggle for Equality
Author: Eric ARNESEN,Eric Arnesen
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674020286
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 1175
From the time the first tracks were laid in the early nineteenth century, the railroad has occupied a crucial place in America's historical imagination. Now, for the first time, Eric Arnesen gives us an untold piece of that vital American institution--the story of African Americans on the railroad. African Americans have been a part of the railroad from its inception, but today they are largely remembered as Pullman porters and track layers. The real history is far richer, a tale of endless struggle, perseverance, and partial victory. In a sweeping narrative, Arnesen re-creates the heroic efforts by black locomotive firemen, brakemen, porters, dining car waiters, and redcaps to fight a pervasive system of racism and job discrimination fostered by their employers, white co-workers, and the unions that legally represented them even while barring them from membership. Decades before the rise of the modern civil rights movement in the mid-1950s, black railroaders forged their own brand of civil rights activism, organizing their own associations, challenging white trade unions, and pursuing legal redress through state and federal courts. In recapturing black railroaders' voices, aspirations, and challenges, Arnesen helps to recast the history of black protest and American labor in the twentieth century. Table of Contents: Prologue 1. Race in the First Century of American Railroading 2. Promise and Failure in the World War I Era 3. The Black Wedge of Civil Rights Unionism 4. Independent Black Unionism in Depression and War 5. The Rise of the Red Caps 6. The Politics of Fair Employment 7. The Politics of Fair Representation 8. Black Railroaders in the Modern Era Conclusion Notes Acknowledgments Index Reviews of this book: In this superbly written monograph, Arnesen...shows how African American railroad workers combined civil rights and labor union activism in their struggles for racial equality in the workplace...Throughout, black locomotive firemen, porters, yardmen, and other railroaders speak eloquently about the work they performed and their confrontations with racist treatment...This history of the 'aristocrats' of the African American working class is highly recommended. --Charles L. Lumpkins, Library Journal Reviews of this book: Arnesen provides a fascinating look at U.S. labor and commerce in the arena of the railroads, so much a part of romantic notions about the growth of the nation. The focus of the book is the troubled history of the railroads in the exploitation of black workers from slavery until the civil rights movement, with an insightful analysis of the broader racial integration brought about by labor activism. --Vanessa Bush, Booklist Reviews of this book: [An] exhaustive and illuminating work of scholarship. --Publishers Weekly Reviews of this book: Arnesen tells a story that should be of interest to a variety of readers, including those who are avid students of this country's railroads. He knows his stuff, and furthermore, reminds us of how dependent American railroads were on the backbreaking labor of racial and ethnic groups whose civil and political status were precarious at best: Irish, Chinese, Mexicans and Italians, as well as African-Americans. But Arnesen's most powerful and provocative argument is that the nature of discrimination not only led black railroad workers to pursue the path of independent unionism, it also propelled them into the larger struggle for civil rights. --Steven Hahn, Chicago Tribune

    • History

The History of Florida


Author: Michael Gannon
Publisher: University Press of Florida
ISBN: 9780813064017
Category: History
Page: 568
View: 7363

    • History

Clearwater


Author: Lisa Coleman
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738514437
Category: History
Page: 128
View: 5534
Clearwater, situated on Florida's Gulf Coast, is a progressive city that is rife with history and known for its breathtaking landscape. The city that has become one of the state's prime destinations was once inhabited by Timucuan, Calusa, and Apalachee tribes. Early settlers called the area that had plentiful fresh springs along its shore Clear Water Harbor from the Native American word "Pocotopaug," and early developers and speculators drew tourists and residents touting Clearwater as a resort community with a comfortable climate. Opportunity and adventure brought many pioneering families, citrus farmers, railroad barons, and land developers to the area. Today, Clearwater is a locality that continues to move forward while preserving its distinct past. Images of America: Clearwater is a unique collection of vintage photographs and facts that brings to life the history of this thriving city. Photographs culled from a variety of sources, including the Clearwater Historical Society and Hillsborough County Public Library's archives, showcase the people, places, and events that have contributed to the history of this special Florida community. Readers can take a visual journey to the unincorporated town of yesteryear to see how James Stevens, "the father of Clearwater;" Rev. C.S. Reynolds; and Henry Plant's grand hotel, the Belleview Biltmore, turned Clearwater into a prosperous city.

    • Transportation

Railroad Vision

Steam Era Images from the Trains Magazine Archives
Author: Kevin P. Keefe
Publisher: Quantuck Lane Press& the Mill rd
ISBN: 9781593720605
Category: Transportation
Page: 200
View: 8586
This elegant volume celebrates the 75th anniversary of Trains Magazine, the premier publication in its field.

    • History

Rising from the Rails

Pullman Porters and the Making of the Black Middle Class
Author: Larry Tye
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466818751
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 1666
An engaging social history that reveals the critical role Pullman porters played in the struggle for African American civil rights When George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former slaves suffering under Jim Crow laws found his offer of a steady job and worldly experience irresistible. They quickly signed up to serve as maid, waiter, concierge, nanny, and occasionally doctor and undertaker to cars full of white passengers, making the Pullman Company the largest employer of African American men in the country by the 1920s. In the world of the Pullman sleeping car, where whites and blacks lived in close proximity, porters developed a unique culture marked by idiosyncratic language, railroad lore, and shared experience. They called difficult passengers "Mister Charlie"; exchanged stories about Daddy Jim, the legendary first Pullman porter; and learned to distinguish generous tippers such as Humphrey Bogart from skinflints like Babe Ruth. At the same time, they played important social, political, and economic roles, carrying jazz and blues to outlying areas, forming America's first black trade union, and acting as forerunners of the modern black middle class by virtue of their social position and income. Drawing on extensive interviews with dozens of porters and their descendants, Larry Tye reconstructs the complicated world of the Pullman porter and the vital cultural, political, and economic roles they played as forerunners of the modern black middle class. Rising from the Rails provides a lively and enlightening look at this important social phenomenon.

    • History

Pistols and Politics

The Dilemma of Democracy in Louisiana's Florida Parishes, 1810--1899
Author: Samuel C. Hyde, Jr.
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807152609
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 7111
In the nineteenth-century South, there existed numerous local pockets where cultures and values different from those of the dominant planter class prevailed. One such area was the Florida parishes of southeastern Louisiana, where peculiar conditions combined to create an enclave of white yeomen. In the years after the Civil War, levels of violence among these men escalated to create a state of chronic anarchy, producing an enduring legacy of bitterness and suspicion. In Samuel C. Hyde's careful and original study of a society that degenerated into utter chaos, he illuminates the factors that allowed these conditions to arise and triumph. Early in the century, the Florida parishes were characterized by an exceptional level of social and political turmoil. Stability emerged as the cotton economy expanded into the piney-woods parishes during the 1820s and 1830s, bringing with it slaves and prosperity -- but also bringing increasing dominance of the region by a powerful planter elite that shaped state government to suit its purposes. By the early 1840s, Jacksonian political rhetoric inspired a newfound assertiveness among the common folk. With the construction of a railroad through the piney-woods region at the close of the antebellum period and the collapse of the planter class at the end of the Civil War, the plain folk were finally able to reject the planters' authority. Traditional patterns of political and economic stability were permanently disrupted, and the residents -- their Jeffersonian traditions now corrupted by the brutal war and Reconstruction periods -- rejected all governance and resorted increasingly to violence as the primary solution to conflict. For the remainder of the nineteenth century, the Florida Parishes had some of the highest murder rates in the country. In Pistols and Politics, Hyde gives serious scrutiny to a region heretofore largely neglected by historians, integrating the anomalies of one area of Louisiana into the history of the state and the wider South. He reassesses the prevailing myth of poverty in the piney woods, portrays the conscious methods of the ruling planter elite to manipulate the common people, and demonstrates the destructive possibilities inherent in the area's political traditions as well as the complex mores, values, and dynamics of a society that produced some of the fiercest and most enduring feuds in American history.

    • History

Some Kind of Paradise

A Chronicle of Man and the Land in Florida
Author: Mark Derr
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813016290
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 8224
For 500 years, visitors to Florida have discovered magic. In Some Kind of Paradise, an eloquent social and environmental history of the state, Mark Derr describes how this exotic land is fast becoming a victim of its own allure. Written with both tenderness and alarm, Derr's book presents competing views of Florida: a paradise to be protected and nurtured or a frontier to be exploited and conquered.

    • Florida

Florida's Civil War Years


Author: Keith W. Kohl
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781461126713
Category: Florida
Page: 168
View: 4610
The American Civil War would leave few parts of a divided land untouched. Florida was one of the places far removed from the areas of heavy fighting. Yet Florida would know the presence of war during the years of 1861 through 1865. The conflict nearly began in one of her coastal harbors, and the state would find its role to be steadily more prominent as the war progressed. Following early actions along the coasts and in surrounding waters, Florida became the scene of a growing number of battles and skirmishes. This is the story of Florida and the experiences of her citizens during this pivotal time in American history.

    • History

Railroads of Southwest Florida


Author: Gregg M. Turner
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738503493
Category: History
Page: 128
View: 9867
When the first "Iron Horse" arrived in Southwest Florida--at Charlotte Harbor in 1886--nearly 150,000 miles of railroads already existed in America, the transcontinental route was open, and Pullman sleeping cars were in wide use. But despite a late start, railroads forever transformed this beautiful region of the Sunshine State and connected its people to the outside world. In Railroads of Southwest Florida, the golden age of railroading is documented with captivating images of stations, machines, and the people whose lives were affected by this significant form of transportation. From interior views of well-furnished passenger cars to scenes of hardworking men who made it all possible, this collection provides a thorough look at a fascinating, almost forgotten heritage.