• History

Archaeologies of Slavery and Freedom in the Caribbean

Exploring the Spaces in Between
Author: Lynsey A. Bates
Publisher: Florida Museum of Natural Hist
ISBN: 9781683400554
Category: History
Page: 372
View: 4796
While the patterns of habitation and development are similar throughout the Caribbean, there was also a great deal of diversity. The authors in this volume use innovative techniques and perspectives to reveal the stories of places and times where the usual rules did not always apply.

    • Social Science

The Archaeology of Traditions

Agency and History Before and After Columbus
Author: Timothy R. Pauketat
Publisher: Orange Groove Books
ISBN: 9781616101299
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 7435
"At last, southeastern archaeology as history of people, not just 'cultures'."--Patricia Galloway, Mississippi Department of Archives and History Rich with the objects of the day-to-day lives of illiterate or common people in the southeastern United States, this book offers an archaeological reevaluation of history itself: where it is, what it is, and how it came to be. Through clothing, cooking, eating, tool making, and other mundane forms of social expression and production, traditions were altered daily in encounters between missionaries and natives, between planters and slaves, and between native leaders and native followers. As this work demonstrates, these "unwritten texts" proved to be potent ingredients in the larger-scale social and political events that shaped how peoples, cultures, and institutions came into being. These developments point to a common social process whereby men and women negotiated about their views of the world and--whether slaves, natives, or Europeans--created history. Bridging the pre-Columbian and colonial past, this book incorporates current theories that cut across disciplines to appeal to anthropologists, historians, and archaeologists. CONTENTS 1. A New Tradition in Archaeology, by Timothy R. Pauketat 2. African-American Tradition and Community in the Antebellum South, by Brian W. Thomas 3. Resistance and Accommodation in Apalachee Province, by John F. Scarry 4. Manipulating Bodies and Emerging Traditions at the Los Adaes Presidio, by Diana DiPaolo Loren 5. Negotiated Tradition? Native American Pottery in the Mission Period in La Florida, by Rebecca Saunders 6. Creek and Pre-Creek Revisited, by Cameron B. Wesson 7. Gender, Tradition, and the Negotiation of Power Relationships in Southern Appalachian Chiefdoms, by Lynne P. Sullivan and Christopher B. Rodning 8. Historical Science or Silence? Toward a Historical Anthropology of Mississippian Political Culture, by Mark A. Rees 9. Cahokian Change and the Authority of Tradition, by Susan M. Alt 10. The Historical-Processual Development of Late Woodland Societies, by Michael S. Nassaney 11. A Tradition of Discontinuity: American Bottom Early and Middle Woodland Culture History Reexamined, by Andrew C. Fortier 12. Interpreting Discontinuity and Historical Process in Midcontinental Late Archaic and Early Woodland Societies, by Thomas E. Emerson and Dale L. McElrath 13. Hunter-Gatherers and Traditions of Resistance, by Kenneth E. Sassaman 14. Traditions as Cultural Production: Implications for Contemporary Archaeological Research, by Kent G. Lightfoot 15. Concluding Thoughts on Tradition, History, and Archaeology, by Timothy R. Pauketat Timothy R. Pauketat, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana, is the author of The Ascent of Chiefs and coeditor of Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World.

    • Social Science

An Archaeology of Black Markets

Local Ceramics and Economies in Eighteenth-century Jamaica
Author: Mark W. Hauser
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 269
View: 2085
In eighteenth-century Jamaica, an informal, underground economy existed among enslaved laborers. Mark Hauser uses pottery fragments to examine their trade networks and to understand how enslaved and free Jamaicans created communities that transcended plantation boundaries. An Archaeology of Black Markets utilizes both documentary and archaeological evidence to reveal how slaves practiced their own systematic forms of economic production, exchange, and consumption. Hauser compares the findings from a number of previously excavated sites and presents new analyses that reinterpret these collections in the context of island-wide trading networks. Trading allowed enslaved laborers to cross boundaries of slave life and enter into a black market of economic practices with pots in hand. By utilizing secret trails that connected plantations, sectarian churches, and these street markets, the enslaved remained in contact, exchanged information, news, and gossip, and ultimately stoked the colony's 1831 rebellion. Hauser considers how uprooted peoples from Africa created new networks in Jamaica, and interjects into archaeological discussions the importance of informal economic practice among non-elite members of society.

    • Social Science

Archaeological Studies of Gender in the Southeastern United States


Author: Jane M. Eastman,Christopher Bernard Rodning
Publisher: University Press of Florida
ISBN: 9780813018751
Category: Social Science
Page: 219
View: 7626
"This book begins the attempt to answer many of the archaeological questions we are finally asking about the long-ignored but crucially important and ever-present social roles of gender among native Americans in the Southeast." -- Nancy Marie White, University of South Florida, coeditor of Grit-Tempered: Early Women Archaeologists in the Southeastern United States In the first book about the archaeology of gender in native societies of southeastern North America, these lively essays reconstruct the different social roles and relationships adopted by women and men before and after the arrival of Europeans in the 16th century. Case studies explore the ways in which gender differences affected people's daily lives by examining material evidence from archaeological sites, including grave goods, human remains, spatial configurations of burials and architecture, and evidence for economic specialization and the division of labor within households. Contents Introduction: Gender and the Archaeology of the Southeast, by Christopher B. Rodning and Jane M. Eastman 1. Challenges for Regendering Southeastern Prehistory, by Cheryl Claassen 2. The Gender Division of Labor in Mississippian Households: Its Role in Shaping Production for Exchange, by Larissa Thomas 3. Life Courses and Gender among Late Prehistoric Siouan Communities, by Jane M. Eastman 4. Mortuary Ritual and Gender Ideology in Protohistoric Southwestern North Carolina, by Christopher B. Rodning 5. Those Men in the Mounds: Gender, Politics, and Mortuary Practices in Late Prehistoric Eastern Tennessee, by Lynne P. Sullivan 6. Piedmont Siouans and Mortuary Archaeology on the Eno River, North Carolina, by Elizabeth I. Monahan Driscoll, R. P. Stephen Davis, Jr., and H. Trawick Ward 7. Auditory Exostoses: A Clue to Gender in Prehistoric and Historic Farming Communities of North Carolina and Virginia, by Patricia M. Lambert 8. Concluding Thoughts, by Janet E. Levy Jane M. Eastman is visiting assistant professor of anthropology at East Carolina University. Christopher B. Rodning is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

    • Social Science

Simplicity, Equality, and Slavery

An Archaeology of Quakerism in the British Virgin Islands, 1740-1780
Author: John M. Chenoweth
Publisher: Florida Museum of Natural Hist
ISBN: 9781683400110
Category: Social Science
Page: 266
View: 9604
The author uses archaeological and archival information to reveal the everyday life of this group of Quakers residing in the British Virgin Islands between 1741 and 1763. He traces this discreet group of mostly poor, white planters settled on Tortola in the community of Little Jost van Dyke from the earliest documented appearance in the 1740 records, through the final census--which showed only five enslaved inhabitants remaining in the community.

    • History

Caciques and Cemi Idols

The Web Spun by Taino Rulers Between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico
Author: José R. Oliver
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817355154
Category: History
Page: 306
View: 1917
Caciques and Cemi Idolstakes a close look at the relationship between humans and other (non-human) beings that are imbued with cemí power, specifically within the Taíno inter-island cultural sphere encompassing Puerto Rico and Hispaniola.

    • Social Science

Cosmopolitan Archaeologies


Author: Lynn Meskell
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822392429
Category: Social Science
Page: 303
View: 3182
An important collection, Cosmopolitan Archaeologies delves into the politics of contemporary archaeology in an increasingly complex international environment. The contributors explore the implications of applying the cosmopolitan ideals of obligation to others and respect for cultural difference to archaeological practice, showing that those ethics increasingly demand the rethinking of research agendas. While cosmopolitan archaeologies must be practiced in contextually specific ways, what unites and defines them is archaeologists’ acceptance of responsibility for the repercussions of their projects, as well as their undertaking of heritage practices attentive to the concerns of the living communities with whom they work. These concerns may require archaeologists to address the impact of war, the political and economic depredations of past regimes, the livelihoods of those living near archaeological sites, or the incursions of transnational companies and institutions. The contributors describe various forms of cosmopolitan engagement involving sites that span the globe. They take up the links between conservation, natural heritage and ecology movements, and the ways that local heritage politics are constructed through international discourses and regulations. They are attentive to how communities near heritage sites are affected by archaeological fieldwork and findings, and to the complex interactions that local communities and national bodies have with international sponsors and universities, conservation agencies, development organizations, and NGOs. Whether discussing the toll of efforts to preserve biodiversity on South Africans living near Kruger National Park, the ways that UNESCO’s global heritage project universalizes the ethic of preservation, or the Open Declaration on Cultural Heritage at Risk that the Archaeological Institute of America sent to the U.S. government before the Iraq invasion, the contributors provide nuanced assessments of the ethical implications of the discursive production, consumption, and governing of other people’s pasts. Contributors. O. Hugo Benavides, Lisa Breglia, Denis Byrne, Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Alfredo González-Ruibal, Ian Hodder, Ian Lilley, Jane Lydon, Lynn Meskell, Sandra Arnold Scham

    • History

Communities in Contact

Essays in Archaeology, Ethnohistory & Ethnography of the Amerindian Circum-Caribbean
Author: Corinne Lisette Hofman,Anne van Duijvenbode
Publisher: Sidestone Press
ISBN: 9088900639
Category: History
Page: 508
View: 9007
"Communities in Contact represents the outcome of the Fourth International Leiden in the Caribbean symposium, entitled "From Prehistory to Ethnography in the circum-Caribbean." The contributions included in this volume cover a wide range of topics from avariety of disciplines - archaeology, bioarchaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography - revolving around the themes of mobility and exchange, culture contact, and settlement and community. The application of innovative approaches and the multi-dimensional character of these essays have provided exiting new perspectives on the indigenous communities of the circum-Caribbean and Amazonian regions throughout prehistory until the present."--pub. desc.

    • Social Science

The Garden of the World

An Historical Archaeology of Sugar Landscapes in the Eastern Caribbean
Author: Dan Hicks
Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 120
View: 5892
This study uses the perspectives of what might be termed the 'empirical tradition' of British landscape archaeology that developed in the 1960s and 1970s, especially in industrial archaeology, to explore the early modern history of the 'garden' landscapes formed by British colonialism in the eastern Caribbean, and their place in the world. It presents a detailed chronological sequence of the changing material conditions of these English-/British-owned plantation landscapes during the 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries, with particular reference to the origins, history and legacies of the sugar industry. The study draws together the results of archaeological fieldwork and documentary research to present a progressive account of the historical landscapes of the islands of St Kitts and St Lucia: sketching a chronological outline of landscape change. This approach to landscape is characterised by the integration of archaeological field survey, standing buildings recording alongside documentary and cartographic sources, and focuses upon producing accounts of material change to landscapes and buildings. By providing a long-term perspective on eastern Caribbean colonial history: from the nature of early, effectively prehistoric contact and interaction in the 16th century, through early permanent European settlements and into the developed sugar societies of the 18th and 19th centuries, the study suggests a temporal and thematic framework of landscape change that might inform the further development of historical archaeology in the island Caribbean region. The broader aim of the study relates to exploring how archaeological techniques can be used to contribute a highly detailed, empirical case study to the interdisciplinary study of postcolonial landscapes and British colonialism. In order to achieve this goal, the study draws upon the techniques of what has been called the 'empirical tradition' of landscape archaeology.

    • Social Science

The Peoples of the Caribbean

An Encyclopedia of Archeology and Traditional Culture
Author: Nicholas J. Saunders
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1576077012
Category: Social Science
Page: 399
View: 9238
Offers a comprehensive guide to the archaeology and traditional culture of the Caribbean.

    • History

Archaeology and the Postcolonial Critique


Author: Matthew Liebmann
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759112353
Category: History
Page: 274
View: 9213
In recent years, postcolonial theories have emerged as one of the significant paradigms of contemporary academia, affecting disciplines throughout the humanities and social sciences. These theories address the complex processes if colonialism on culture and society—with repect to both the colonizers and the colonized—to help us understand the colonial experience in its entirety. The contributors to Archaeology and the Postcolonial Critique present critical syntheses of archaeological and postcolonial studies by examining both Old and New World case studies, and they ask what the ultimate effect of postcolonial theorizing will be on the practice of archaeology in the twenty-first century.

    • Social Science

Bioarchaeology

The Contextual Analysis of Human Remains
Author: Jane E Buikstra,Lane A Beck
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315432919
Category: Social Science
Page: 628
View: 9479
The core subject matter of bioarchaeology is the lives of past peoples, interpreted anthropologically. Human remains, contextualized archaeologically and historically, form the unit of study. Integrative and frequently inter-disciplinary, bioarchaeology draws methods and theoretical perspectives from across the sciences and the humanities. Bioarchaeology: The Contextual Study of Human Remains focuses upon the contemporary practice of bioarchaeology in North American contexts, its accomplishments and challenges. Appendixes, a glossary and 150 page bibliography make the volume extremely useful for research and teaching.

    • Social Science

The Limits of Tyranny


Author: James A. Delle
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1621900878
Category: Social Science
Page: 268
View: 1627
The long history of slavery in the Americas has left a wealth of archaeological evidence from excavations of southern and Caribbean plantations. These excavations have largely informed our ideas of African slavery, but, more recently, scholars have also focused on northern slave sites and the various degrees of slavery pertaining not only to Africans but to Native Americans and even European immigrants as well. The Limits of Tyranny brings together nine essays that illuminate the struggles of slaves against the structure of inequality found throughout the Americas in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. These essays use the concept of struggle to explore the archaeological dimensions of various sites in the Caribbean and the American South and Northeast. The actions of the enslaved, both collectively and as individuals, altered or eliminated the social forces that oppressed them. The contributors discuss the physical struggle through slave uprisings and organized rebellions and the moral struggle through historic laws and ethical behavior common in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. They also define the limits of oppression and use the material evidence associated with each site to determine the lengths to which slaves would go to fight their enslavement. The Limits of Tyranny advances the study of the African diaspora and reconsiders the African American experience in terms of dominance and resistance. This volume will appeal to any archaeologist looking to move beyond the common discourse on slavery and assess more closely the African struggle against tyranny. James A. Delle is a professor in the Anthropology and Sociology Department at Kutztown University in Pennsylvania. He is coauthor, with Mark Leone, of An Archaeology of Social Space and coeditor, with Stephen Mrozowski and Robert Paynter, of Lines That Divide: Historical Archaeologies of Race, Class, and Gender.

    • Social Science

A Companion to Archaeology


Author: John Bintliff
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470998601
Category: Social Science
Page: 568
View: 3537
A Companion to Archaeology features essays from 27 of the world’s leading authorities on different types of archaeology that aim to define the field and describe what it means to be an archaeologist. Shows that contemporary archaeology is an astonishingly broad activity, with many contrasting specializations and ways of approaching the material record of past societies. Includes essays by experts in reading the past through art, linguistics, or the built environment, and by professionals who present the past through heritage management and museums. Introduces the reader to a range of archaeologists: those who devote themselves to the philosophy of archaeology, those who see archaeology as politics or anthropology, and those who contend that the essence of the discipline is a hard science.

    • History

Out of Many, One People

The Historical Archaeology of Colonial Jamaica
Author: James A. Delle,Mark W. Hauser,Douglas V. Armstrong
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817356487
Category: History
Page: 332
View: 8572
Scholars present archaeological findings to paint a complex and fascinating picture of life in colonial Jamaica. Simultaneous.

    • History

Island Lives

Historical Archaeologies of the Caribbean
Author: Paul Farnsworth
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817310932
Category: History
Page: 378
View: 3723
This comprehensive study of the historical archaeology of the Caribbean provides sociopolitical context for the ongoing development of national identities; points to the future by suggesting different trajectories that historical archaeology and its practitioners may take in the Caribbean arena; and elucidates the problems and issues faced worldwide by researchers working in colonial and post-colonial societies.

    • Education

American Higher Education

Issues and Institutions
Author: John R. Thelin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317498615
Category: Education
Page: 380
View: 1327
Higher education in the United States is a complex, diverse, and important enterprise. The latest book in the Core Concepts in Higher Education series brings to life issues of governance, organization, teaching and learning, student life, faculty, finances, college sports, public policy, fundraising, and innovations in higher education today. Written by renowned author John R. Thelin, each chapter bridges research, theory, and practice and discusses a range of institutions – including the often overlooked for-profits, community colleges, and minority serving institutions. A blend of stories and analysis, this exciting new book challenges present and future higher education practitioners to be informed and active participants, capable of improving their institutions.

    • History

Slavery Behind the Wall

An Archaeology of a Cuban Coffee Plantation
Author: Theresa A. Singleton
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813054117
Category: History
Page: 286
View: 763
A significant contribution in Caribbean archaeology. Singleton weaves archaeological and documentary evidence into a compelling narrative of the lives of the enslaved at Santa Ana de Biajacas. Patricia Samford, author of "Subfloor Pits and the Archaeology of Slavery in Colonial Virginia" Presents results of the first historical archaeology in Cuba by an American archaeologist since the 1950s revolution. Singleton s extensive historical research provides rich context for this and future archaeological investigations, and the entire body of her pioneering research provides comparative material for other studies of African American life and institutional slavery in the Caribbean and the Americas. Leland Ferguson, author of "God s Fields: Landscape, Religion, and Race in Moravian Wachovia" Singleton s enlightening findings on plantation slavery life will undoubtedly constitute a reference point for future studies on Afro-Cuban archaeology. Manuel Barcia, author of "The Great African Slave Revolt of 1825: Cuba and the Fight for Freedom in Matanzas " Cuba had the largest slave society of the Spanish colonial empire. At Santa Ana de Biajacas the plantation owner sequestered slaves behind a massive masonry wall. In the first archaeological investigation of a Cuban plantation by an English speaker, Theresa Singleton explores how elite Cuban planters used the built environment to impose a hierarchical social order upon slave laborers. Behind the wall, slaves reclaimed the space as their own, forming communities, building their own houses, celebrating, gambling, and even harboring slave runaways. What emerged there is not just an identity distinct from other North American and Caribbean plantations, but a unique slave culture that thrived despite a spartan lifestyle. Singleton s study provides insight into the larger historical context of the African diaspora, global patterns of enslavement, and the development of Cuba as an integral member of the larger Atlantic World. A volume in the series Cultural Heritage Studies, edited by Paul Shackel "

    • History

Encyclopedia of Caribbean Archaeology


Author: Basil A. Reid,R. Grant Gilmore, III
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813044200
Category: History
Page: 383
View: 2761
A sweeping overview of the scholarly information available on archaeology in the Caribbean, tackling the usual questions of colonization, adaptation, and evolution while embracing such newer aspects as geoinformatics and archaeometry.

    • Fiction

Tatham Mound


Author: Piers Anthony
Publisher: Avon Books
ISBN: 9780380713097
Category: Fiction
Page: 522
View: 5582
Sent by the spirits, Hotfoot, a native American prophet, travels among the various tribes of North America to deliver his people from the devastation that awaits them. Reprint.