• Music

Black Noise

Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America
Author: Tricia Rose
Publisher: Wesleyan
ISBN: 9780819562753
Category: Music
Page: 257
View: 8010
From its beginnings in hip hop culture, the dense rhythms and aggressive lyrics of rap music have made it a provocative fixture on the American cultural landscape. In Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America, Tricia Rose, described by the New York Times as a "hip hop theorist," takes a comprehensive look at the lyrics, music, cultures, themes, and styles of this highly rhythmic, rhymed storytelling and grapples with the most salient issues and debates that surround it. Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and History at New York University, Tricia Rose sorts through rap's multiple voices by exploring its underlying urban cultural politics, particularly the influential New York City rap scene, and discusses rap as a unique musical form in which traditional African-based oral traditions fuse with cutting-edge music technologies. Next she takes up rap's racial politics, its sharp criticisms of the police and the government, and the responses of those institutions. Finally, she explores the complex sexual politics of rap, including questions of misogyny, sexual domination, and female rappers' critiques of men. But these debates do not overshadow rappers' own words and thoughts. Rose also closely examines the lyrics and videos for songs by artists such as Public Enemy, KRS-One, Salt N' Pepa, MC Lyte, and L. L. Cool J. and draws on candid interviews with Queen Latifah, music producer Eric "Vietnam" Sadler, dancer Crazy Legs, and others to paint the full range of rap's political and aesthetic spectrum. In the end, Rose observes, rap music remains a vibrant force with its own aesthetic, "a noisy and powerful element of contemporary American popular culture which continues to draw a great deal of attention to itself."

    • Social Science

Hip Hop America


Author: Nelson George
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101007303
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 1655
From Nelson George, supervising producer and writer of the hit Netflix series, "The Get Down, Hip Hop America is the definitive account of the society-altering collision between black youth culture and the mass media. From the Trade Paperback edition.

    • Social Science

Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance


Author: Houston A. Baker, Jr.
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022615629X
Category: Social Science
Page: 132
View: 9450
"Mr. Baker perceives the harlem Renaissance as a crucial moment in a movement, predating the 1920's, when Afro-Americans embraced the task of self-determination and in so doing gave forth a distinctive form of expression that still echoes in a broad spectrum of 20th-century Afro-American arts. . . . Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance may well become Afro-America's 'studying manual.'"—Tonya Bolden, New York Times Book Review

    • Music

Rap Music and the Poetics of Identity


Author: Adam Krims
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521634472
Category: Music
Page: 217
View: 3421
This is the first book to discuss in detail how rap music is put together musically and how it contributes to the formation of cultural identities for both artists and audiences. It also argues that current skeptical attitudes toward music analysis in popular music studies are misplaced and need to be reconsidered if cultural studies are to treat seriously the social force of rap music, popular musics, and music in general. Drawing extensively on recent scholarship in popular music studies, cultural theory, communications, critical theory, and musicology, Krims redefines 'music theory' as meaning simply 'theory about music', in which musical poetics (the study of how musical sound is deployed) may play a crucial role when its claims are contextualized and demystified. Theorizing local and global geographies of rap, Krims discusses at length the music of Ice Cube, the Goodie MoB, KRS-One, Dutch group the Spookrijders, and Canadian Cree rapper Bannock.

    • Music

The Hip Hop Wars

What We Talk about when We Talk about Hip Hop--and why it Matters
Author: Tricia Rose
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465008976
Category: Music
Page: 308
View: 6293
Argues that hip hop has become a primary way to talk about race in America, examining the links between hip hop, violence, and sexism and whether or not hip hop's portrayal of black culture undermines black advancement.

    • Music

Somebody Scream!

Rap Music's Rise to Prominence in the Aftershock of Black Power
Author: Marcus Reeves
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780865479975
Category: Music
Page: 320
View: 683
Traces the history of rap music as a key component of the black arts movement in the wake of the civil rights and black power movements, examining the music and its politics, profiling ten key artists and their influence on the evolution of rap, and the music's birth as an expression of urban life and culture. Reprint.

    • Music

Noise and Spirit

The Religious and Spiritual Sensibilities of Rap Music
Author: Anthony B. Pinn
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814766994
Category: Music
Page: 214
View: 8505
2007 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Winner of the Passing the Torch Award from the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies It has been called sperm, semen, seed, cum, jizz, spunk, gentlemen's relish, and splooge. But however the “tacky, opaque liquid that comes out of the penis” is described, the very act of defining “sperm” and “semen” depends on your point of view. For Lisa Jean Moore, how sperm comes to be known is based on who defines it (a scientist vs. a defense witness, for example), under what social circumstances it is found (a doctor’s office vs. a crime scene), and for what purposes it will be used (in vitro fertilization vs. DNA analysis). Examining semen historically, medically, and culturally, Sperm Counts is a penetrating exploration of its meaning and power. Using a “;follow that sperm” approach, Moore shows how representations of sperm and semen are always in flux, tracing their twisting journeys from male reproductive glands to headline news stories and presidential impeachment trials. Much like the fluid of semen itself can leak onto fabrics and into bodies, its meanings seep into our consciousness over time. Moore’s analytic lens yields intriguing observations of how sperm is “spent” and “reabsorbed” as it spurts, swims, and careens through penises, vaginas, test tubes, labs, families, cultures, and politics. Drawn from fifteen years of research, Sperm Counts examines historical and scientific documents, children's “facts of life” books, pornography, the Internet, forensic transcripts and sex worker narratives to explain how semen got so complicated. Among other things, understanding how we produce, represent, deploy and institutionalize semen-biomedically, socially and culturally-provides valuable new perspectives on the changing social position of men and the evolving meanings of masculinity. Ultimately, as Moore reveals, sperm is intimately involved in not only the physical reproduction of males and females, but in how we come to understand ourselves as men and women.

    • Music

Prophets of the Hood

Politics and Poetics in Hip Hop
Author: Imani Perry
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822386151
Category: Music
Page: 248
View: 2503
At once the most lucrative, popular, and culturally oppositional musical force in the United States, hip hop demands the kind of interpretation Imani Perry provides here: criticism engaged with this vibrant musical form on its own terms. A scholar and a fan, Perry considers the art, politics, and culture of hip hop through an analysis of song lyrics, the words of the prophets of the hood. Recognizing prevailing characterizations of hip hop as a transnational musical form, Perry advances a powerful argument that hip hop is first and foremost black American music. At the same time, she contends that many studies have shortchanged the aesthetic value of rap by attributing its form and content primarily to socioeconomic factors. Her innovative analysis revels in the artistry of hip hop, revealing it as an art of innovation, not deprivation. Perry offers detailed readings of the lyrics of many hip hop artists, including Ice Cube, Public Enemy, De La Soul, krs-One, OutKast, Sean “Puffy” Combs, Tupac Shakur, Lil’ Kim, Biggie Smalls, Nas, Method Man, and Lauryn Hill. She focuses on the cultural foundations of the music and on the form and narrative features of the songs—the call and response, the reliance on the break, the use of metaphor, and the recurring figures of the trickster and the outlaw. Perry also provides complex considerations of hip hop’s association with crime, violence, and misogyny. She shows that while its message may be disconcerting, rap often expresses brilliant insights about existence in a society mired in difficult racial and gender politics. Hip hop, she suggests, airs a much wider, more troubling range of black experience than was projected during the civil rights era. It provides a unique public space where the sacred and the profane impulses within African American culture unite.

    • Art

What the Music Said

Black Popular Music and Black Public Culture
Author: Mark Anthony Neal
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135204624
Category: Art
Page: 215
View: 7344
First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

    • Art

Microphone Fiends

Youth Music and Youth Culture
Author: Tricia Rose,Andrew Ross
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135208409
Category: Art
Page: 288
View: 8376
Microphone Fiends, a collection of original essays and interviews, brings together some of the best known scholars, critics, journalists and performers to focus on the contemporary scene. It includes theoretical discussions of musical history along with social commentaries about genres like disco, metal and rap music, and case histories of specific movements like the Riot Grrls, funk clubbing in Rio de Janeiro, and the British rave scene.

    • Performing Arts

Representing

Hip Hop Culture and the Production of Black Cinema
Author: S. Craig Watkins
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226874890
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 314
View: 9832
In this book, S. Craig Watkins examines two of the most important developments in the recent history of black cinemathe ascendancy of Spike Lee and the proliferation of "ghettocentric films" like Boyz N the Hood and Menace II Society. Representing explores a distinct contradiction in American society: at the same time that black youth have become the targets of a fierce racial backlash against crime, drugs, affirmative action, and rap music, their popular expressive cultures have become highly visible and commercially viable. Further, Watkins considers the imprint of black youth on the landscape of black filmmaking.

    • Music

Black noise

rap music & Black cultural resistance in contemporary American popular culture
Author: Tricia Rose
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Music
Page: 562
View: 688

    • Music

Hip Hop Matters

Politics, Pop Culture, and the Struggle for the Soul of a Movement
Author: S. Craig Watkins
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807009864
Category: Music
Page: 295
View: 5961
The author explores the evolution of hip hop and the backlash against it, from Detroit Mayer Kwame Killpatrick, the nation's first hip hop mayor, to the reception of the music on college campuses, where debates over its misogyny thrive. Reprint.

    • Social Science

Nuthin' but a "G" Thang

The Culture and Commerce of Gangsta Rap
Author: Eithne Quinn
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231518102
Category: Social Science
Page: 264
View: 1854
In the late 1980s, gangsta rap music emerged in urban America, giving voice to—and making money for—a social group widely considered to be in crisis: young, poor, black men. From its local origins, gangsta rap went on to flood the mainstream, generating enormous popularity and profits. Yet the highly charged lyrics, public battles, and hard, fast lifestyles that characterize the genre have incited the anger of many public figures and proponents of "family values." Constantly engaging questions of black identity and race relations, poverty and wealth, gangsta rap represents one of the most profound influences on pop culture in the last thirty years. Focusing on the artists Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, the Geto Boys, Snoop Dogg, and Tupac Shakur, Quinn explores the origins, development, and immense appeal of gangsta rap. Including detailed readings in urban geography, neoconservative politics, subcultural formations, black cultural debates, and music industry conditions, this book explains how and why this music genre emerged. In Nuthin'but a "G" Thang, Quinn argues that gangsta rap both reflected and reinforced the decline in black protest culture and the great rise in individualist and entrepreneurial thinking that took place in the U.S. after the 1970s. Uncovering gangsta rap's deep roots in black working-class expressive culture, she stresses the music's aesthetic pleasures and complexities that have often been ignored in critical accounts.

    • Music

That's the Joint!

The Hip-hop Studies Reader
Author: Murray Forman,Mark Anthony Neal
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415969192
Category: Music
Page: 628
View: 2174
Spanning 25 years of serious writing on hip-hop by noted scholars and mainstream journalists, this comprehensive anthology includes observations and critiques on groundbreaking hip-hop recordings.

    • History

Race Music

Black Cultures from Bebop to Hip-Hop
Author: Guthrie P. Ramsey
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520243331
Category: History
Page: 281
View: 2829
Traces the history of African-American music from bebop to hip-hop, discussing how the African-American experience has often been chronicled through various forms of music.

    • Social Science

The Hip-Hop Generation

Young Blacks and the Crisis in African-American Culture
Author: Bakari Kitwana
Publisher: Civitas Books
ISBN: 0786724935
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 6861
The Hip Hop Generation is an eloquent testament for black youth culture at the turn of the century. The only in-depth study of the first generation to grow up in post-segregation America, it combines culture and politics into a pivotal work in American studies. Bakari Kitwana, one of black America's sharpest young critics, offers a sobering look at this generation's disproportionate social and political troubles, and celebrates the activism and politics that may herald the beginning of a new phase of African-American empowerment.

    • Social Science

Everything But the Burden

What White People Are Taking from Black Culture
Author: Greg Tate
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 9780767911269
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 5509
White kids from the ’burbs are throwing up gang signs. The 2001 Grammy winner for best rap artist was as white as rice. And blond-haired sorority sisters are sporting FUBU gear. What is going on in American culture that’s giving our nation a racial-identity crisis? Following the trail blazed by Norman Mailer’s controversial essay “The White Negro,” Everything but the Burden brings together voices from music, popular culture, the literary world, and the media speaking about how from Brooklyn to the Badlands white people are co-opting black styles of music, dance, dress, and slang. In this collection, the essayists examine how whites seem to be taking on, as editor Greg Tate’s mother used to tell him, “everything but the burden”–from fetishizing black athletes to spinning the ghetto lifestyle into a glamorous commodity. Is this a way of shaking off the fear of the unknown? A flattering indicator of appreciation? Or is it a more complicated cultural exchange? The pieces in Everything but the Burden explore the line between hero-worship and paternalism. Among the book’s twelve essays are Vernon Reid’s “Steely Dan Understood as the Apotheosis of ‘The White Negro,’” Carl Hancock Rux’s “The Beats: America’s First ‘Wiggas,’” and Greg Tate’s own introductory essay “Nigs ’R Us.” Other contributors include: Hilton Als, Beth Coleman, Tony Green, Robin Kelley, Arthur Jafa, Gary Dauphin, Michaela Angela Davis, dream hampton, and Manthia diAwara. From the Hardcover edition.

    • Social Science

Longing to Tell

Black Women Talk About Sexuality and Intimacy
Author: Tricia Rose
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9781429923453
Category: Social Science
Page: 432
View: 9154
The Sexual Lives of Black Women, In Their Own Words In a culture driven by sexual and racial imagery, very few honest conversations about race, gender, and sexuality actually take place. In their absence, commonly held perceptions of black women as teenage mothers, welfare recipients, mammies, or exotic sexual playthings remain unchanged. For fear that telling their stories will fulfill society's implicit expectations about their sexuality, most black women have retreated into silence. Tricia Rose seeks to break this silence and jump-start a dialogue by presenting, for the first time, the sexual testimonies of black women. Spanning a broad range of ages, levels of education, and socioeconomic backgrounds, twenty women, in their own words, talk with startling honesty about sex, love, family, relationships, and intimacy. Their stories dispel prevailing myths and provide revealing insights into how black women navigate the complex terrain of sexuality. Nuanced, rich, and powerful, Longing to Tell will be required reading for anyone interested in issues of race and gender.

    • African American arts.

Between God and Gangsta Rap

Bearing Witness to Black Culture
Author: Michael Eric Dyson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: N.A
Category: African American arts.
Page: 218
View: 2235
Offering a multifaceted view of African-American issues, a collection of essays brings together writings on music, religion, politics, and identity under such headings as "Testimonials," "Obsessed with O. J.," and "Lessons." UP.