• History

Civil Rights Since 1787

A Reader on the Black Struggle
Author: Jonathan Birnbaum,Clarence Taylor
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814782159
Category: History
Page: 936
View: 4000
Winner of the 2001 Gustavus Myers Program Book Award. Contrary to simple textbook tales, the civil rights movement did not arise spontaneously in 1954 with the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision. The black struggle for civil rights can be traced back to the arrival of the first Africans, and to their work in the plantations, manufacturies, and homes of the Americas. Civil rights was thus born as labor history. Civil Rights Since 1787 tells the story of that struggle in its full context, dividing the struggle into six major periods, from slavery to Reconstruction, from segregation to the Second Reconstruction, and from the current backlash to the future prospects for a Third Reconstruction. The "prize" that the movement has sought has often been reduced to a quest for the vote in the South. But all involved in the struggle have always known that the prize is much more than the vote, that the goal is economic as well as political. Further, in distinction from other work, Civil Rights Since 1787 establishes the links between racial repression and the repression of labor and the left, and emphasizes the North as a region of civil rights struggle. Featuring the voices and philosophies of orators, activists, and politicians, this anthology emphasizes the role of those ignored by history, as well as the part that education and religion have played in the movement. Civil Rights Since 1787 serves up an informative mix of primary documents and secondary analysis and includes the work of such figures as Ella Baker, Mary Frances Berry, Clayborne Carson, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, Eric Foner, Herb Gutman, Fannie Lou Hamer, A. Leon Higginbotham, Darlene Clark Hine, Jesse Jackson, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Manning Marable, Nell Painter, Frances Fox Piven and Richard Cloward, A. Philip Randolph, Mary Church Terrell, and Howard Zinn.

    • History

Black Religious Intellectuals

The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the 21st Century
Author: Clarence Taylor
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136061789
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 9290
Professor Clarence Taylor sheds some much-needed light on the rich intellectual and political tradition that lies in the black religious community. From the Pentecostalism of Bishop Smallwood Williams and the flamboyant leadership of the Reverend Al Sharpton, to the radical Presbyterianism of Milton Arthur Galamison and the controversial and mass-mobilization by Minister Louis Farrakhan, black religious leaders have figured prominently in the struggle for social equality in America.

    • Social Science

Human Trafficking

Applying Research, Theory, and Case Studies
Author: Noël Bridget Busch-Armendariz,Maura Nsonwu,Laurie Cook Heffron
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1506305709
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 3916
Human Trafficking: Applying Research, Theory, and Case Studies is a practical, interdisciplinary text that draws from empirically grounded scholarship, survivor-centered practices, and an ecological perspective to help readers develop an understanding of the meaning and scope of human trafficking. Throughout the book, authors Noël Bridget Busch-Armendariz , Maura Nsonwu, and Laurie Cook Heffron address the specific vulnerabilities of human trafficking victims, their medical-psycho-social needs, and issues related to direct service delivery. They also address the identification of human trafficking crimes, traffickers, and the impact of this crime on the global economy. Using detailed case studies to illuminate real situations, the book covers national and international anti-trafficking policies, prevention and intervention strategies, promising practices to combat human trafficking, responses of law enforcement and service providers, organizational challenges, and the cost of trafficking to human wellbeing.

    • History

The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939


Author: Robert L Harris Jr.,Rosalyn Terborg-Penn
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023151087X
Category: History
Page: 456
View: 2771
This book is a multifaceted approach to understanding the central developments in African American history since 1939. It combines a historical overview of key personalities and movements with essays by leading scholars on specific facets of the African American experience, a chronology of events, and a guide to further study. Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, the editors chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods; consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in U.S. society; discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass; and address the complexity of the contemporary African American experience. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g.,"Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American". While emphasizing political and social developments, this volume also illuminates important economic, military, and cultural themes. An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 provides a thorough understanding of a crucial historical period.

    • Law

Simple Justice

The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality
Author: Richard Kluger
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030754608X
Category: Law
Page: 880
View: 7766
Simple Justice is the definitive history of the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education and the epic struggle for racial equality in this country. Combining intensive research with original interviews with surviving participants, Richard Kluger provides the fullest possible view of the human and legal drama in the years before 1954, the cumulative assaults on the white power structure that defended segregation, and the step-by-step establishment of a team of inspired black lawyers that could successfully challenge the law. Now, on the fiftieth anniversary of the unanimous Supreme Court decision that ended legal segregation, Kluger has updated his work with a new final chapter covering events and issues that have arisen since the book was first published, including developments in civil rights and recent cases involving affirmative action, which rose directly out of Brown v. Board of Education. From the Trade Paperback edition.


    • Social Science

There's Always Work at the Post Office

African American Postal Workers and the Fight for Jobs, Justice, and Equality
Author: Philip F. Rubio
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807895733
Category: Social Science
Page: 472
View: 5390
This book brings to life the important but neglected story of African American postal workers and the critical role they played in the U.S. labor and black freedom movements. Historian Philip Rubio, a former postal worker, integrates civil rights, labor, and left movement histories that too often are written as if they happened separately. Centered on New York City and Washington, D.C., the book chronicles a struggle of national significance through its examination of the post office, a workplace with facilities and unions serving every city and town in the United States. Black postal workers--often college-educated military veterans--fought their way into postal positions and unions and became a critical force for social change. They combined black labor protest and civic traditions to construct a civil rights unionism at the post office. They were a major factor in the 1970 nationwide postal wildcat strike, which resulted in full collective bargaining rights for the major postal unions under the newly established U.S. Postal Service in 1971. In making the fight for equality primary, African American postal workers were influential in shaping today's post office and postal unions.

    • Social Science

Freedom Facts and Firsts

400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience
Author: Jessie Carney Smith,Linda T Wynn
Publisher: Visible Ink Press
ISBN: 1578592607
Category: Social Science
Page: 408
View: 2628
Spanning nearly 400 years from the early abolitionists to the present, this guide book profiles more than 400 people, places, and events that have shaped the history of the black struggle for freedom. Coverage includes information on such mainstay figures as Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and Rosa Parks, but also delves into how lesser known figures contributed to and shaped the history of civil rights. Learn how the Housewives' League of Detroit started a nationwide movement to support black businesses, helping many to survive the depression; or discover what effect sports journalist Samuel Harold Lacy had on Jackie Robinson's historic entrance into the major leagues. This comprehensive resource chronicles the breadth and passion of an entire people's quest for freedom.

    • History

The Logic of Political Violence

Lessons in Reform and Revolution
Author: Craig Rosebraugh
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 0974288411
Category: History
Page: 276
View: 7399
Within Westernized societies, particularly the United States, there has been a near-universal acceptance that nonviolent action has been the foundation on which the progress and/or success of political and social justice movements have been built. Yet, contrary to popular belief, political violence has played a crucial role in advancing historic justice struggles. This breakthrough study examines the historic roles that both nonviolence and political violence have played in international social and political movements. The profound and well-researched conclusions presented advocate the necessity of political and social revolution in the United States--using any means necessary. This is an excellent resource for those contemplating political and social change and for anyone involved in political and social movements, especially those wondering why single-issue pursuits rarely, if ever, are successful. Challenging the predominant societal norms on the political and social change process in the United States, this is an important contribution to the struggle that may very well become the new American revolution.

    • Political Science

Boston Against Busing

Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the 1960s and 1970s
Author: Ronald P. Formisano
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807869708
Category: Political Science
Page: 376
View: 9313
Perhaps the most spectacular reaction to court-ordered busing in the 1970s occurred in Boston, where there was intense and protracted protest. Ron Formisano explores the sources of white opposition to school desegregation. Racism was a key factor, Formisano argues, but racial prejudice alone cannot explain the movement. Class resentment, ethnic rivalries, and the defense of neighborhood turf all played powerful roles in the protest. In a new epilogue, Formisano brings the story up to the present day, describing the end of desegregation orders in Boston and other cities. He also examines the nationwide trend toward the resegregation of schools, which he explains is the result of Supreme Court decisions, attacks on affirmative action, white flight, and other factors. He closes with a brief look at the few school districts that have attempted to base school assignment policies on class or economic status.

    • History

I've Got a Home in Glory Land

A Lost Tale of the Underground Railroad
Author: Karolyn Smardz Frost
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466806125
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 2194
It was the day before Independence Day, 1831. As his bride, Lucie, was about to be "sold down the river" to the slave markets of New Orleans, young Thornton Blackburn planned a daring—and successful—daylight escape from Louisville. But they were discovered by slave catchers in Michigan and slated to return to Kentucky in chains, until the black community rallied to their cause. The Blackburn Riot of 1833 was the first racial uprising in Detroit history. The couple was spirited across the river to Canada, but their safety proved illusory. In June 1833, Michigan's governor demanded their extradition. The Blackburn case was the first serious legal dispute between Canada and the United States regarding the Underground Railroad. The impassioned defense of the Blackburns by Canada's lieutenant governor set precedents for all future fugitive-slave cases. The Blackburns settled in Toronto and founded the city's first taxi business. But they never forgot the millions who still suffered in slavery. Working with prominent abolitionists, Thornton and Lucie made their home a haven for runaways. The Blackburns died in the 1890s, and their fascinating tale was lost to history. Lost, that is, until a chance archaeological discovery in a downtown Toronto school yard brought the story of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn again to light.

    • History

Say It Loud

Great Speeches on Civil Rights and African American Identity
Author: Catherine Ellis,Stephen Smith
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 159558627X
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 4808
Includes powerful speeches by Malcolm X, Fred Hampton, Angela Davis, Bayard Rustin, Martin Luther King Jr., James Cone, Toni Morrison, Cornel West, and many others

    • Art

A People s Art History of the United States

250 Years of Activist Art and Artists Working in Social Justice Movements
Author: Nicolas Lampert
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595589317
Category: Art
Page: 384
View: 9805
Most people outside of the art world view art as something that is foreign to their experiences and everyday lives. A People’s Art History of the United States places art history squarely in the rough–and–tumble of politics, social struggles, and the fight for justice from the colonial era through the present day. Author and radical artist Nicolas Lampert combines historical sweep with detailed examinations of individual artists and works in a politically charged narrative that spans the conquest of the Americas, the American Revolution, slavery and abolition, western expansion, the suffragette movement and feminism, civil rights movements, environmental movements, LGBT movements, antiglobalization movements, contemporary antiwar movements, and beyond. A People’s Art History of the United States introduces us to key works of American radical art alongside dramatic retellings of the histories that inspired them. Stylishly illustrated with over two hundred images, this book is nothing less than an alternative education for anyone interested in the powerful role that art plays in our society.

    • Social Science

Toward a Literacy of Promise

Joining the African-American Struggle
Author: Linda A. Spears-Bunton,Rebecca Powell
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 3092
"[This book] gives us strategies for bringing life back to school; it allows us to think creatively about connecting instruction to the lives of children who have not been well-served; it helps us learn to value the gifts with words our children of color bring; and it gives us hope for educating a generation that can change the status quo, that will build the America we have yet to see...the one that made that as-yet-unfulfilled promise of 'liberty and justice for all.'" Lisa Delpit, From the Foreword Toward a Literacy of Promise examines popular assumptions about literacy and challenges readers to question how it has been used historically both to empower and to oppress. The authors offer an alternative view of literacy – a "literacy of promise" – that charts an emancipatory agenda for literacy instructional practices in schools. Weaving together critical perspectives on pedagogy, language, literature, and popular texts, each chapter provides an in-depth discussion that illuminates how a literacy of promise can be realized in school and classrooms. Although the major focus is on African American middle and secondary students as a population that has experienced the consequences of inequality, the chapters demonstrate general and specific applications to other populations.

    • Education

Knocking at Our Own Door

Milton A. Galamison and the Struggle to Integrate New York City Schools
Author: Clarence Taylor,Milton Arthur Galamison
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739102275
Category: Education
Page: 262
View: 4258
What caused one of America's most promising civil rights movements to implode on the eve of change? Knocking at Our Own Door chronicles the life of New York's preeminent but little-studied integrationist, Milton A. Galamison, and his controversial struggle to improve the lives of the city's most underprivileged children. This detailed account brings insight into the complexities of urban politics, race relations, and school reform.

    • History

The American civil rights movement

readings & interpretations
Author: Raymond D'Angelo,Raymond Nicholas D'Angelo
Publisher: Dushkin Pub Group
ISBN: 9780072399875
Category: History
Page: 592
View: 3828
This new reader comprises an extensive collection of primary and secondary documents of the American Civil Rights movement. These documents are complemented by analytical and interpretive essays by the editor, setting these documents in their historical, social, and political context.The seeds for the modern Civil Rights Movement were planted nearly a century ago within the black Baptist Church, labor unions, the black press, and organizations like the NAACP and the SNYC. Each of the seven sections of this book present a carefully chosen selection of newspaper, magazine, and journal articles, letters, speeches, reports, and legal documents, all chronicling the one aspect of the movement for black rights from the earliest days of post-Civil War segregation to the present. The works of eminent scholars, historians, legislators, and jurists alternate with the voices of movement leaders and followers, black politicians, black entertainers, and average citizens, all blending together to tell the story of struggle, failures, and successes on the road to equality for Black Americans.

    • History

Between Homeland and Motherland

Africa, U.S. Foreign Policy, and Black Leadership in America
Author: Alvin B. Tillery Jr.
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801461491
Category: History
Page: 216
View: 8822
In Between Homeland and Motherland, Alvin B. Tillery Jr. considers the history of political engagement with Africa on the part of African Americans, beginning with the birth of Paul Cuffe's back-to-Africa movement in the Federal Period to the Congressional Black Caucus's struggle to reach consensus on the African Growth and Opportunity Act of 2000. In contrast to the prevailing view that pan-Africanism has been the dominant ideology guiding black leaders in formulating foreign policy positions toward Africa, Tillery highlights the importance of domestic politics and factors within the African American community. Employing an innovative multimethod approach that combines archival research, statistical modeling, and interviews, Tillery argues that among African American elites-activists, intellectuals, and politicians-factors internal to the community played a large role in shaping their approach to African issues, and that shaping U.S. policy toward Africa was often secondary to winning political battles in the domestic arena. At the same time, Africa and its interests were important to America's black elite, and Tillery's analysis reveals that many black leaders have strong attachments to the "motherland." Spanning two centuries of African American engagement with Africa, this book shows how black leaders continuously balanced national, transnational, and community impulses, whether distancing themselves from Marcus Garvey's back-to-Africa movement, supporting the anticolonialism movements of the 1950s, or opposing South African apartheid in the 1980s.

    • Authors, English

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

With Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects
Author: Mary Wollstonecraft
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Authors, English
Page: 287
View: 8067

    • Biography & Autobiography

The Martin Luther King, Jr., Encyclopedia


Author: N.A
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313294402
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 404
View: 4179
Aphabetially arranged entries about the life and works of Martin Luther King, Jr. cover his relationships with other African American leaders, relatives, and associates, his theological and political influences, and his political allies and opponents, aswell as major events in his life.

    • Literary Collections

The American Civil Rights Movement


Author: Benjamin Türksoy
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3656142076
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 21
View: 8672
Studienarbeit aus dem Jahr 2006 im Fachbereich Amerikanistik - Kultur und Landeskunde, Note: 2, Universität Hamburg (Anglistik und Amerikanistik), Veranstaltung: American Civil Rights Movement, Sprache: Deutsch, Abstract: In March 1958, a pacifistic group named “The Fellowship of Reconciliation” that had provided most of CORE’s early leaders sent James Lawson to Nashville to lead a workshop in non-violence for African-American activists. A year later, as a divinity student at Nashville’s Vanderbilt University, Lawson drew a small but morally charged number of young men and women from the black colleges to his regular training sessions in non-violent protest1. In the fall of 1959, this Nashville student group stages test sit-ins at segregated city restaurants and lunch counters. Staying just long enough to draw refusal of service, they failed either to change management policy or to draw others into the protest. Lawson had outrun the zeitgeist by a few months. With the Greensboro sit-ins of February 1960, though, the Nashville group acquired a prophetic luster. Soon Lawson was directing hundreds of students who volunteered in disciplined protests against segregation in downtown stores.