• History

Ghosts of the Tsunami

Death and Life in Japan's Disaster Zone
Author: Richard Lloyd Parry
Publisher: MCD
ISBN: 0374710937
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 6768
Named one of the best books of 2017 by The Guardian, NPR, GQ, The Economist, Bookforum, Amazon, and Lit Hub The definitive account of what happened, why, and above all how it felt, when catastrophe hit Japan—by the Japan correspondent of The Times (London) and author of People Who Eat Darkness On March 11, 2011, a powerful earthquake sent a 120-foot-high tsunami smashing into the coast of northeast Japan. By the time the sea retreated, more than eighteen thousand people had been crushed, burned to death, or drowned. It was Japan’s greatest single loss of life since the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. It set off a national crisis and the meltdown of a nuclear power plant. And even after the immediate emergency had abated, the trauma of the disaster continued to express itself in bizarre and mysterious ways. Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, lived through the earthquake in Tokyo and spent six years reporting from the disaster zone. There he encountered stories of ghosts and hauntings, and met a priest who exorcised the spirits of the dead. And he found himself drawn back again and again to a village that had suffered the greatest loss of all, a community tormented by unbearable mysteries of its own. What really happened to the local children as they waited in the schoolyard in the moments before the tsunami? Why did their teachers not evacuate them to safety? And why was the unbearable truth being so stubbornly covered up? Ghosts of the Tsunami is a soon-to-be classic intimate account of an epic tragedy, told through the accounts of those who lived through it. It tells the story of how a nation faced a catastrophe, and the struggle to find consolation in the ruins.

    • History

Ghosts of the Tsunami

Death and Life in Japan's Disaster Zone
Author: Richard Lloyd Parry
Publisher: MCD
ISBN: 0374253978
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 2649
The definitive account of what happened, why, and above all how it felt, when catastrophe hit Japan—by the Japan correspondent of The Times (London) and author of People Who Eat Darkness On March 11, 2011, a powerful earthquake sent a 120-foot-high tsunami smashing into the coast of northeast Japan. By the time the sea retreated, more than eighteen thousand people had been crushed, burned to death, or drowned. It was Japan’s greatest single loss of life since the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. It set off a national crisis and the meltdown of a nuclear power plant. And even after the immediate emergency had abated, the trauma of the disaster continued to express itself in bizarre and mysterious ways. Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, lived through the earthquake in Tokyo and spent six years reporting from the disaster zone. There he encountered stories of ghosts and hauntings, and met a priest who exorcised the spirits of the dead. And he found himself drawn back again and again to a village that had suffered the greatest loss of all, a community tormented by unbearable mysteries of its own. What really happened to the local children as they waited in the schoolyard in the moments before the tsunami? Why did their teachers not evacuate them to safety? And why was the unbearable truth being so stubbornly covered up? Ghosts of the Tsunami is a soon-to-be classic intimate account of an epic tragedy, told through the accounts of those who lived through it. It tells the story of how a nation faced a catastrophe, and the struggle to find consolation in the ruins.

    • Social Science

Ghosts of the Tsunami

Death and Life in Japan’s Disaster Zone
Author: Richard Lloyd Parry
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1473546664
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 5156
**WINNER OF THE RATHBONES FOLIO PRIZE** ‘The definitive book on the quake which killed more than 15,000 people.’ Mail Online ‘You will not read a finer work of narrative non-fiction this year.’ Economist ‘A breathtaking, extraordinary work of non-fiction.’ Times Literary Supplement ‘A future classic of disaster journalism.’ Observer On 11 March 2011, a massive earthquake sent a 120-foot-high tsunami smashing into the coast of north-east Japan. By the time the sea retreated, more than 18,500 people had been crushed, burned to death, or drowned. It was Japan’s greatest single loss of life since the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, lived through the earthquake in Tokyo, and spent six years reporting from the disaster zone. He met a priest who performed exorcisms on people possessed by the spirits of the dead. And he found himself drawn back again and again to a village which had suffered the greatest loss of all, a community tormented by unbearable mysteries of its own. What really happened to the local children as they waited in the school playground in the moments before the tsunami? Why did their teachers not evacuate them to safety? And why was the unbearable truth being so stubbornly covered up? Ghosts of the Tsunami is a classic of literary non-fiction, a heart-breaking and intimate account of an epic tragedy, told through the personal accounts of those who lived through it. It tells the story of how a nation faced a catastrophe, and the bleak struggle to find consolation in the ruins.

    • Biography & Autobiography

People Who Eat Darkness

The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo--and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up
Author: Richard Lloyd Parry
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0374230595
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 454
View: 6718
Looks at the disappearance and murder of Lucie Blackman in Tokyo, following every step of the investigation and offering a grim portrait of her suspected killer. Original.

    • History

In the Time of Madness

Indonesia on the Edge of Chaos
Author: Richard Lloyd Parry
Publisher: Grove Press
ISBN: 9780802142931
Category: History
Page: 315
View: 2113
A riveting study of the violent and turbulent nation of Indonesia describes how the tumultuous end of the reign of the dictator General Suharto led to a savage and murderous rampage, a situation complicated by economic turmoil, volcanic eruption, East Timor's struggle for independence, and other disasters. Reprint.

    • History

Strong in the Rain

Surviving Japan's Earthquake, Tsunami, and Fukushima Nuclear Disaster
Author: Lucy Birmingham,David McNeill
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1137050608
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 4662
Blending history, science, and gripping storytelling, Strong in the Rain brings the 9.0 magnitude earthquake that struck Japan in 2011 and its immediate aftermath to life through the eyes of the men and women who experienced it. Following the narratives of six individuals, the book traces the shape of a disaster and the heroics it prompted, including that of David Chumreonlert, a Texan with Thai roots, trapped in his school's gymnasium with hundreds of students and teachers as it begins to flood, and Taro Watanabe, who thought nothing of returning to the Fukushima plant to fight the nuclear disaster, despite the effects that he knew would stay with him for the rest of his life. This is a beautifully written and moving account of how the Japanese experienced one of the worst earthquakes in history and endured its horrific consequences.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Where the Dead Pause, and the Japanese Say Goodbye: A Journey


Author: Marie Mutsuki Mockett
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393246744
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 352
View: 3340
“Read it. You will be uplifted.”—Ruth Ozeki, Zen priest, author of A Tale for the Time Being Marie Mutsuki Mockett's family owns a Buddhist temple 25 miles from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. In March 2011, after the earthquake and tsunami, radiation levels prohibited the burial of her Japanese grandfather's bones. As Japan mourned thousands of people lost in the disaster, Mockett also grieved for her American father, who had died unexpectedly. Seeking consolation, Mockett is guided by a colorful cast of Zen priests and ordinary Japanese who perform rituals that disturb, haunt, and finally uplift her. Her journey leads her into the radiation zone in an intricate white hazmat suit; to Eiheiji, a school for Zen Buddhist monks; on a visit to a Crab Lady and Fuzzy-Headed Priest’s temple on Mount Doom; and into the "thick dark" of the subterranean labyrinth under Kiyomizu temple, among other twists and turns. From the ecstasy of a cherry blossom festival in the radiation zone to the ghosts inhabiting chopsticks, Mockett writes of both the earthly and the sublime with extraordinary sensitivity. Her unpretentious and engaging voice makes her the kind of companion a reader wants to stay with wherever she goes, even into the heart of grief itself.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Every Third Thought

On Life, Death, and the Endgame
Author: Robert McCrum
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 1509815317
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: N.A
View: 7654
As read on BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week 'Moving, intellectual and unsentimental. I think it will become a classic' Melvyn Bragg 'Thoughtful, subtle, elegantly clever and oddly joyous, Every Third Thought is beautiful' Kate Mosse In 1995, at the age of forty-two, Robert McCrum suffered a dramatic and near-fatal stroke. Since that life-changing event, McCrum has lived in the shadow of death, unavoidably aware of his own mortality. And now, in his sixties, he is noticing a change: his friends are joining him there. Death has become his contemporaries’ every third thought. And so, with the words of McCrum’s favourite authors as travel companions, Every Third Thought takes us on a journey towards death itself. This is a deeply personal book of reflection and conversation – with brain surgeons, psychologists, hospice workers and patients, writers and poets, and it confronts an existential question: in a world where we have learnt to live well at all costs, can we make peace with dying?

    • Travel

Super Sushi Ramen Express

One Family's Journey Through the Belly of Japan
Author: Michael Booth
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250099803
Category: Travel
Page: 336
View: 9550
From the author of The Almost Nearly Perfect People comes a fascinating and funny culinary journey through Japan Japan is arguably the preeminent food nation on earth; it’s a mecca for the world’s greatest chefs and has more Michelin stars than any other country. The Japanese go to extraordinary lengths and expense to eat food that is marked both by its exquisite preparation and exotic content. Their creativity, dedication, and courage in the face of dishes such as cod sperm and octopus ice cream are only now beginning to be fully appreciated in the sushi and ramen-saturated West, as are the remarkable health benefits of the traditional Japanese diet. Food and travel writer Michael Booth takes the culinary pulse of contemporary Japan, learning fascinating tips and recipes that few westerners have been privy to before. Accompanied by two fussy eaters under the age of six, he and his wife travel the length of the country, from bear-infested, beer-loving Hokkaido to snake-infested, seaweed-loving Okinawa. Along the way, they dine with—and score a surprising victory over—sumo wrestlers, pamper the world’s most expensive cows with massage and beer, share a seaside lunch with free-diving female abalone hunters, and meet the greatest chefs working in Japan today. Less happily, they witness a mass fugu slaughter, are traumatized by an encounter with giant crabs, and attempt a calamitous cooking demonstration for the lunching ladies of Kyoto.

    • History

A History of East Asia

From the Origins of Civilization to the Twenty-First Century
Author: Charles Holcombe
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 110810777X
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 4339
Charles Holcombe begins by asking the question 'what is East Asia?' In the modern age, many of the features that made the region - now defined as including China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam - distinct have been submerged by the effects of revolution, politics or globalization. Yet, as an ancient civilization, the region had both an historical and cultural coherence. This shared past is at the heart of this ambitious book, which traces the story of East Asia from the dawn of history to the twenty-first century. The second edition has been imaginatively revised and expanded to place emphasis on cross-cultural interactions and connections, both within East Asia and beyond, with new material on Vietnam and modern pop culture. The second edition also features a Chinese character list, additional maps and new illustrations.

    • Science

The Cure for Catastrophe

How We Can Stop Manufacturing Natural Disasters
Author: Robert Muir-Wood
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465096476
Category: Science
Page: 368
View: 5672
We can’t stop natural disasters, but we can stop them from being disastrous. One of the world’s foremost risk experts tells us how. Year after year, floods sweep cities clean, earthquakes tear apart communities, and tornadoes uproot towns. Disasters bring with them rampage and despair. But does it have to be this way? In The Cure for Catastrophe, Robert Muir-Wood makes the controversial claim that our natural disasters are in fact human ones: we keep building in the wrong places and in the wrong way, putting brick buildings in the way of earthquakes, wood ones in the way of fire, and cities in the paths of tropical storms. We refuse to evacuate, blindly trusting our flood walls and disaster preparations, until they fail, making catastrophes even more deadly. From the great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 to Hurricane Katrina, the story of natural disasters is less about a hostile environment than about human foolishness, denial, and greed. But there is hope, if humans cause catastrophes, we can also prevent them.

    • Social Science

Japan Copes with Calamity

Ethnographies of the Earthquake, Tsunami and Nuclear Disasters of March 2011
Author: Tom Gill,Brigitte Steger,David H. Slater
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9783034309226
Category: Social Science
Page: 316
View: 6602
This book is the first collection of ethnographies in English on the Japanese communities affected by the giant Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011 and the ensuing crisis at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. It brings together studies by experienced researchers of Japan from field sites around the disaster zone. The contributors present the survivors' struggles in their own words: from enduring life in shelters and temporary housing, through re-creating the fishing industry, to rebuilding life-ways and relationships bruised by bereavement. They contrast the sudden brutal loss of life from the tsunami with the protracted anxiety about exposure to radiation and study the battle to protect children, family and a way of life from the effects of destruction, displacement and discrimination. The local communities' encounters with volunteers and journalists who poured into Tohoku after the disaster and the campaign to win compensation from the state and nuclear industry are also explored. This volume offers insights into the social fabric of rural communities in north-eastern Japan and suggests how the human response to disaster may be improved in the future.

    • History

A History of Popular Culture in Japan

From the Seventeenth Century to the Present
Author: E. Taylor Atkins
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474258557
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 4359
The phenomenon of 'Cool Japan' is one of the distinctive features of global popular culture of the millennial age. A History of Popular Culture in Japan provides the first historical and analytical overview of popular culture in Japan from its origins in the 17th century to the present day, using it to explore broader themes of conflict, power, identity and meaning in Japanese history. E. Taylor Atkins shows how Japan is one of the earliest sites for the development of mass-produced, market-oriented cultural products consumed by urban middle and working classes. The best-known traditional arts and culture of Japan- no theater, monochrome ink painting, court literature, poetry and indigenous music-inhabited a world distinct from that of urban commoners, who fashioned their own expressive forms and laid the groundwork for today's 'gross national cool.' Popular culture was pivotal in the rise of Japanese nationalism, imperialism, militarism, postwar democracy and economic development. Offering historiographical and analytical frameworks for understanding its subject, A History of Popular Culture in Japan synthesizes the latest scholarship from a variety of disciplines. It is a vital resource for students of Japanese cultural history wishing to gain a deeper understanding of Japan's contributions to global cultural heritage.

    • Poetry

A Map of Faring


Author: Peter Riley
Publisher: Parlor Press LLC
ISBN: 9781932559590
Category: Poetry
Page: 95
View: 7594
In this collection of free verse, landscape and encounters become the vocabulary of a personal exploration of senses of time and passage, and the fate of small localities in the spread of global forces.

    • Applied ethics

The Ordinary Virtues

Moral Order in a Divided World
Author: Michael Ignatieff
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674976274
Category: Applied ethics
Page: 236
View: 6384
Introduction: Moral globalization and its discontents -- Jackson Heights, New York: Diversity Plaza -- Los Angeles: the moral operating systems of global cities -- Rio de Janeiro: order, corruption, and public trust -- Bosnia: war and reconciliation -- Myanmar: the politics of moral narrative -- Fukushima: resilience and the unimaginable -- South Africa: after the rainbow -- Conclusion: Human rights, global ethics, and the ordinary virtues

    • History

Facing the Wave

A Journey in the Wake of the Tsunami
Author: Gretel Ehrlich
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307949273
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 6633
Kirkus Best Books of the Year * Kansas City Star Best Books of the Year A passionate student of Japanese poetry, theater, and art for much of her life, Gretel Ehrlich felt compelled to return to the earthquake-and-tsunami-devastated Tohoku coast to bear witness, listen to survivors, and experience their terror and exhilaration in villages and towns where all shelter and hope seemed lost. In an eloquent narrative that blends strong reportage, poetic observation, and deeply felt reflection, she takes us into the upside-down world of northeastern Japan, where nothing is certain and where the boundaries between living and dying have been erased by water. The stories of rice farmers, monks, and wanderers; of fishermen who drove their boats up the steep wall of the wave; and of an eighty-four-year-old geisha who survived the tsunami to hand down a song that only she still remembered are both harrowing and inspirational. Facing death, facing life, and coming to terms with impermanence are equally compelling in a landscape of surreal desolation, as the ghostly specter of Fukushima Daiichi, the nuclear power complex, spews radiation into the ocean and air. Facing the Wave is a testament to the buoyancy, spirit, humor, and strong-mindedness of those who must find their way in a suddenly shattered world.

    • Fiction

The Rathbones


Author: Janice Clark
Publisher: Anchor Books
ISBN: 0345803612
Category: Fiction
Page: 370
View: 8401
The fifteen-year-old heir of a once-prosperous seafaring dynasty in New England who spends her days in a crumbling ancestral mansion embarks on a voyage that reveals her family's haunted history.

    • Travel

Another Kyoto


Author: Alex Kerr,Kathy Arlyn Sokol
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141988347
Category: Travel
Page: 336
View: 5449
Another Kyoto is an insider's meditation on the hidden wonders of Japan's most enigmatic city. Drawing on decades living in Kyoto, and on lore gleaned from artists, Zen monks and Shinto priests, Alex Kerr illuminates the simplest things - a temple gate, a wall, a sliding door - in a new way. 'A rich book of intimate proportions ... In Kyoto, facts and meaning are often hidden in plain sight. Kerr's gift is to make us stop and cast our eyes upward to a temple plaque, or to squint into the gloom of an abbot's chamber' Japan Times 'Kerr and Sokol have performed a minor miracle by presenting that which is present in Kyoto as that which we have yet to see. I know that I will never pass a wall, or tread a floor, or sit on tatami the same way again' Kyoto Journal

    • Biography & Autobiography

Tsunami Kids

Our Journey from Survival to Success
Author: Paul Forkan,Rob Forkan
Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books
ISBN: 1782433589
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: N.A
View: 5226
On Boxing Day 2004, Rob, Paul, Matty and Rosie Forkan lost their parents in the tsunami that devastated Sri Lanka. Aged from eight to 17, they subsequently made a harrowing 200km trek across the decimated country to try and find their parents and get home. The bravery and ingenuity they displayed was a direct result of their unique upbringing. When disaster struck, they had been working for charities in the Middle East and India for four years. Taken out of school at a young age, they had received an unconventional global education, learning independence and emotional resilience. Almost a decade after the tsunami, the two eldest brothers, Rob and Paul, had a dream. They created the multinational brand, Gandys Flip Flops, in the front room of their rented flat, and also set up the charitable foundation, Orphans for Orphans, using 10% of their profits to support children deprived of essentials such as education, nutrition and medication. This is an enthralling, harrowing but ultimately uplifting journey from the slums of India and the tsunami, to the boardrooms of the City of London, Downing Street and beyond.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Fukushima


Author: Mark Willacy
Publisher: Macmillan Publishers Aus.
ISBN: 1743289553
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 352
View: 3103
On 11 March 2011, Japan was rocked by the most violent earthquake in her history and one of the largest ever recorded. The quake itself was just the start of a chain of disastrous events, creating a massive tsunami that slammed the shores of north eastern Japan. Close to 20,000 people were killed or disappeared under waves that reached more than 40 metres high as they smashed their way several kilometres inland. Yet the greatest damage was caused when the tsunami surged over the seawall of Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station, resulting in a multiple core meltdown that released vast quantities of radioactivity into the atmosphere and ocean. At one stage it even threatened the evacuation and irradiation of Tokyo itself, which would have spelt the end of Japan as we know it. Fukushima is the incredible story behind the twin catastrophes of the tsunami and nuclear meltdown, seen through the eyes of witnesses and victims - from former prime minister Naoto Kan, the plant director and senior engineers of Fukushima Dai-Ichi, the elite firefighters who risked their lives to avert the ultimate nuclear nightmare, to the mother excavating the wreckage as she looked for her daughter's remains.