• Social Science

Coins and Power in Late Iron Age Britain


Author: John Creighton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139431729
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 4472
Cunobelin, Shakespeare's Cymbeline, ruled much of south-east Britain in the years before Claudius' legions arrived, creating the Roman province of Britannia. But what do we know of him and his rule, and that of competing dynasties in south-east Britain? This book examines the background to these, the first individuals in British history. It explores the way in which rulers bolstered their power through the use of imagery on coins, myths, language and material culture. After the visit of Caesar in 55 and 54 BC, the shadow of Rome played a fundamental role in this process. Combining the archaeological, literary and numismatic evidence, John Creighton paints a vivid picture of how people in late Iron Age Britain reacted to the changing world around them.

    • History

Iron Age Britain


Author: Barry Cunliffe
Publisher: Pavilion Books
ISBN: 1849942404
Category: History
Page: 300
View: 8824
This revised introduction to Britain in the first millennium BC incorporates modifications to a story that is still controversial. It covers a time of dramatic change in Europe, dominated by the emergence of Rome as a megastate. In Britain, on the extremity of these developments, it was a period of profound social and economic change, which saw the end of the prehistoric cycle of the Neolithic and bronze Ages, and the beginning of a world that was to change little in its essentials until the great voyages of colonization and trade of the 16th century. The theme of the book is that of social change within an insular society sitting on the periphery of a world in revolution.

    • Social Science

The Iron Age in Northern Britain

Britons and Romans, Natives and Settlers
Author: Dennis W. Harding
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317296508
Category: Social Science
Page: 406
View: 4227
The Iron Age in Northern Britain examines the archaeological evidence for earlier Iron Age communities from the southern Pennines to the Northern and Western Isles and the impact of Roman expansion on local populations, through to the emergence of historically-recorded communities in the post-Roman period. The text has been comprehensively revised and expanded to include new discoveries and to take account of advanced techniques, with many new and updated illustrations. The volume presents a comprehensive picture of the ‘long Iron Age’, allowing readers to appreciate how perceptions of Iron Age societies have changed significantly in recent years. New material in this second edition also addresses the key issues of social reconstruction, gender, and identity, as well as assessing the impact of developer-funded archaeology on the discipline. Drawing on recent excavation and research and interpreting evidence from key studies across Scotland and northern England, The Iron Age in Northern Britain continues to be an accessible and authoritative study of later prehistory in the region.

    • Celts

Britain and the Celtic Iron Age


Author: Simon James,Valery Rigby
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780714123066
Category: Celts
Page: 90
View: 5756
The Celts are seen as a family of European peoples who spoke related languages and shared many things in common, from art to aspects of religion and social organization. Was the British Iron Age simply part of this supposedly uniform, Celtic world, or was it something much more distinctive, complex, strange and fascinating than we have been led to believe? New research is promoting reappraisals of Britain's prehistory, in ways which challenge many ideas, such as that of a familiar Celtic past.

    • Burial

Death and Burial in Iron Age Britain


Author: D. W. Harding
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199687560
Category: Burial
Page: 352
View: 9920
Archaeologists have long acknowledged the absence of a regular and recurrent burial rite in the British Iron Age, and have looked to rites such as cremation and scattering of remains to explain the minimal impact of funerary practices on the archaeological record. In Death and Burial in Iron Age Britain, Harding examines the deposition of human and animal remains from the period - from whole skeletons to disarticulated fragments - and challenges theassumption that there should have been any regular form of cemetery in prehistory, arguing that the dead were more commonly integrated into settlements of the living than segregated into dedicated cemeteries.

    • History

Iron Age Communities in Britain

An Account of England, Scotland and Wales from the Seventh Century BC until the Roman Conquest
Author: Barry Cunliffe
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134938039
Category: History
Page: 700
View: 9204
Since its first publication in 1971, Barry Cunliffe's monumental survey has established itself as a classic of British archaeology. This fully revised fourth edition maintains the qualities of the earlier editions, whilst taking into account the significant developments that have moulded the discipline in recent years. Barry Cunliffe here incorporates new theoretical approaches, technological advances and a range of new sites and finds, ensuring that Iron Age Communities in Britain remains the definitive guide to the subject.

    • History

The Later Iron Age in Britain and Beyond


Author: Colin Haselgrove,Thomas Hugh Moore
Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 9122
The nature and causes of the transformation in settlement, social structure, and material culture that occurred in Britain during the Later Iron Age (c. 400-300 BC to the Roman conquest) have long been a focus of research. In the past, however, there was a tendency for attention to be directed mostly to southern England and the increased manifestations of Gaulish and Roman influence apparent there towards the end of this period. For the most part, developments in other regions were assumed to be secondary in character and of relatively little significance. Thanks to new work, this viewpoint can no longer be sustained. Throughout Britain, the extent and vitality of the social changes taking place during the later first millennium BC is becoming more apparent, as is the long-term character of many of the processes involved. The time is ripe therefore for new narratives of the Later Iron Age to be created, drawing on the burgeoning material from developer-funded archaeology and the Portable Antiquities Scheme, as well as on new methodological and theoretical approaches. The thirty-one papers collected here seek to re-conceptualise our visions of Later Iron Age societies in Britain by examining regions and topics that have received less attention in the past and by breaking down the artificial barriers often erected between artefact analysis and landscape studies. Themes considered include the expansion and enclosure of settlement, production and exchange, agricultural and social complexity, treatment of the dead, material culture and identity, at scales ranging from the household to the supra-regional. At the same time, the inclusion of papers on Ireland, northern France, the Low Countries, Denmark, and Germany allows insular Later Iron Age developments to be placed in a wider geographical context, ensuring that Britain is no longer studied in isolation.

    • History

Iron Age Hillforts in Britain and Beyond


Author: Dennis Harding
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199695245
Category: History
Page: 334
View: 9219
Widely regarded as major visible field monuments of the Iron Age, hillforts are central to an understanding of later prehistoric communities in Britain and Europe from the later Bronze Age. With such a range of variants represented, no single explanation of their function or social significance could satisfy all possible interpretations of their role. Critically reviewing the evidence of hillforts in Britain, in the wider context of Irelandand continental Europe, the volume focuses on their structural features, chronology, landscape context, and their social, economic and symbolic functions, and is well illustrated throughout with siteplans, reconstruction drawings, and photographs. Harding reviews the changing perceptions of hillforts and the future prospects for hillfort research, highlighting aspects of contemporary investigation and interpretation.

    • History

Dress and Identity in Iron Age Britain

A Study of Glass Beads and Other Objects of Personal Adornment
Author: Elizabeth Marie Foulds
Publisher: Archaeopress Archaeology
ISBN: 9781784915261
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 4549
Through an analysis of glass beads from four key study regions in Britain, the book aims to explore the role that this object played within the networks and relationships that constructed Iron Age society.


    • Social Science

Animal Husbandry Regimes in Iron Age Britain

A Comparative Study of Faunal Assemblages from British Iron Age Sites
Author: Ellen Hambleton
Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 162
View: 1014
Our knowledge of subsistence patterns in Iron Age Britain is reasonably good in terms of crop husbandry, but much less is known about broad patterns of animal husbandry regimes. In this study, Ellen Hambleton developes a methodology for comparing faunal data from disparate assemblages and introduces ways of assessing inter- and intra-regional patterns. She highlights the chronological as well as geographical variations in the pattern of animal husbandry between c.750BC and AD50.

    • Coin hoards

British Iron Age Coins in the British Museum


Author: Richard Hobbs
Publisher: British Museum Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Coin hoards
Page: 246
View: 6854
The British Museum's unrivalled collection of over 4,500 pieces, minted at the end of the iron Age in the first century BC until immediately before the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43, is published for the first time in this comprehensive catalogue. A full listing of the coins is provided, from the earliest British gold and silver of the mid-first century BC to the so-called dynastic issues in the central part of Britain and the distinctive regional issues of the peripheral coin-using areas. Indices are provided for the inscriptions and hoards and for the vast range of symbols which appear on the coins. An extensive bibliography and concordance is included and each piece is illustrated.

    • Social Science

The Iron Age in Lowland Britain


Author: D.W. Harding
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317602854
Category: Social Science
Page: 300
View: 5720
This book was written at a time when the older conventional diffusionist view of prehistory, largely associated with the work of V. Gordon Childe, was under rigorous scrutiny from British prehistorians, who still nevertheless regarded the ‘Arras’ culture of eastern Yorkshire and the ‘Belgic’ cemeteries of south-eastern Britain as the product of immigrants from continental Europe. Sympathetic to the idea of population mobility as one mechanism for cultural innovation, as widely recognized historically, it nevertheless attempted a critical re-appraisal of the southern British Iron Age in its continental context. Subsequent fashion in later prehistoric studies has favoured economic, social and cognitive approaches, and the cultural-historical framework has largely been superseded. Routine use of radiocarbon dating and other science-based applications, and new field data resulting from developer-led archaeology have revolutionized understanding of the British Iron Age, and once again raised issues of its relationship to continental Europe.

    • History

Iron Age Communities in Britain

An Account of England, Scotland and Wales from the Seventh Century BC until the Roman Conquest
Author: Barry Cunliffe
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134938039
Category: History
Page: 700
View: 3154
Since its first publication in 1971, Barry Cunliffe's monumental survey has established itself as a classic of British archaeology. This fully revised fourth edition maintains the qualities of the earlier editions, whilst taking into account the significant developments that have moulded the discipline in recent years. Barry Cunliffe here incorporates new theoretical approaches, technological advances and a range of new sites and finds, ensuring that Iron Age Communities in Britain remains the definitive guide to the subject.

    • Science

Reconstructing Iron Age societies

new approaches to the British Iron Age
Author: Anthony Sinclair,Adam Gwilt,Colin Haselgrove,John Gowlett
Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited
ISBN: N.A
Category: Science
Page: 448
View: 6682
A huge collection of papers on scientific analysis in archaeology from a conference held in Liverpool in 1995. Papers are grouped under ten headings: Scientific analysis of Petrology (3 papers); of Glass (five papers); of Ceramics (7 papers); Metallurgy (9 papers); Chronological Studies (9 papers); Dendrochronological Studies (3 papers); The Study of Ancient Enviroments (16 papers); Remote Sensing (2 papers); The Analysis of Human Remains (5 papers) and Perspectives on Human Evolution and Early Hominid Artefacts (9 papers). Subjects studied include Stonehenge dolerites, early Egyptian glass, Greek Archaic transport amphorae, Roman brooches, South Indian bronzes, dendrochronological datings of Viking ships, phytolith analysis from the Indus Valley, Pakistan, the microflora of the Milos catacombs, Greece and Medieval glass making technology.

    • Britons

Book of Iron Age Britain


Author: Barry Cunliffe
Publisher: Batsford
ISBN: 9780713472998
Category: Britons
Page: 128
View: 1635
A detailed study of the dramatic developments that took place during the first millenium BC. During this time, Europe underwent rapid changes, dominated by the emergence of Rome as a mega-state. Britain, on the periphery of these revolutions, witnessed its own particular social and economic transformations. The Bronze Age cycle of subsistence farming came to an end, leading to a more complex society that altered very little until the 16th century.

    • Health & Fitness

The Iron Age in Northern Britain

Celts and Romans, Natives and Invaders
Author: Dennis William Harding
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780415301497
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 350
View: 6706
The Iron Age in Northern Britainexamines the impact of the Roman expansion northwards, and the native response to the Roman occupation on both sides of the frontiers. It traces the emergence of historically-recorded communities in the post-Roman period and looks at the clash of cultures between Celts and Romans, Picts and Scots. Northern Britain has too often been seen as peripheral to a 'core' located in south-eastern England. Unlike the Iron Age in southern Britain, the story of which can be conveniently terminated with the Roman conquest, the Iron Age in northern Britain has no such horizon to mark its end. The Roman presence in southern and eastern Scotland was militarily intermittent and left untouched large tracts of Atlantic Scotland for which there is a rich legacy of Iron Age settlement, continuing from the mid-first millennium BC to the period of Norse settlement in the late first millennium AD. Here D.W. Harding shows that northern Britain was not peripheral in the Iron Age: it simply belonged to an Atlantic European mainstream different from southern England and its immediate continental neighbours.

    • Social Science

The Earlier Iron Age in Britain and the Near Continent


Author: Colin Haselgrove,Rachel Pope
Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 428
View: 9674
Seeks to establish what we now know (and do not know) about Earlier Iron Age communities in Britain and their neighbours on the Continent. The authors look at how communities of the Late Bronze Age transform into those of the Earlier Iron Age, and how we understand the social changes of the later first millennium BC.