• History

Jews in the Gym

Judaism, Sports, and Athletics
Author: Leonard Jay Greenspoon
Publisher: Purdue University Press
ISBN: 1557536295
Category: History
Page: 289
View: 4022
For some, the connection between Jews and athletics might seem far-fetched. But in fact, as is highlighted by the fourteen chapters in this collection, Jews have been participating in -- and thinking about -- sports for more than two thousand years. The articles in this volume scan a wide chronological range: from the Hellenistic period (first century BCE) to the most recent basketball season. The range of athletes covered is equally broad: from participants in Roman-style games to wrestlers, boxers, fencers, baseball players, and basketball stars. The authors of these essays, many of whom actively participate in athletics themselves, raise a number of intriguing questions, such as: What differing attitudes toward sports have Jews exhibited across periods and cultures? Is it possible to be a "good Jew" and a "great athlete"? In what sports have Jews excelled, and why? How have Jews overcome prejudices on the part of the general populace against a Jewish presence on the field or in the ring? In what ways has Jewish participation in sports aided, or failed to aid, the perception of Jews as "good Germans," "good Hungarians," "good Americans," and so forth? This volume, which features a number of illustrations (many of them quite rare), is not only accessible to the general reader, but also contains much information of interest to the scholar in Jewish studies, American studies, and sports history.

    • Literary Criticism

The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Jewish Cultures


Author: Nadia Valman,Laurence Roth
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135048541
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 414
View: 2042
The Routledge Handbook to Contemporary Jewish Cultures explores the diversity of Jewish cultures and ways of investigating them, presenting the different methodologies, arguments and challenges within the discipline. Divided into themed sections, this book considers in turn: How the individual terms "Jewish" and "culture" are defined, looking at perspectives from Anthropology, Music, Literary Studies, Sociology, Religious Studies, History, Art History, and Film, Television, and New Media Studies. How Jewish cultures are theorized, looking at key themes regarding power, textuality, religion/secularity, memory, bodies, space and place, and networks. Case studies in contemporary Jewish cultures. With essays by leading scholars in Jewish culture, this book offers a clear overview of the field and offers exciting new directions for the future.

    • Sports & Recreation

New York Sports

Glamour and Grit in the Empire City
Author: Stephen Norwood
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 1610756355
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 410
View: 3636
New York has long been both America’s leading cultural center and its sports capital, with far more championship teams, intracity World Series, and major prizefights than any other city. Pro football’s “Greatest Game Ever Played” took place in New York, along with what was arguably history’s most significant boxing match, the 1938 title bout between Joe Louis and Max Schmeling. As the nation’s most crowded city, basketball proved to be an ideal sport, and for many years it was the site of the country’s most prestigious college basketball tournament. New York boasts storied stadiums, arenas, and gymnasiums and is the home of one of the world’s two leading marathons as well as the Belmont Stakes, the third event in horse racing’s Triple Crown. New York sportswriters also wield national influence and have done much to connect sports to larger social and cultural issues, and the vitality and distinctiveness of New York’s street games, its ethnic institutions, and its sports-centered restaurants and drinking establishments all contribute to the city’s uniqueness. New York Sports collects the work of fourteen leading sport historians, providing new insight into the social and cultural history of America’s major metropolis and of the United States. These writers address the topics of changing conceptions of manhood and violence, leisure and social class, urban night life and entertainment, women and athletics, ethnicity and assimilation, and more.

    • History

Philly Sports

Teams, Games, and Athletes from Rocky's Town
Author: Ryan Swanson,David K. Wiggins
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 1557281874
Category: History
Page: 334
View: 7005
Not distributed; available at Arkansas State Library.

    • Sports & Recreation

Sports in American History, 2E

From Colonization to Globalization
Author: Gems, Gerald,Borish, Linda,Pfister, Gertrud
Publisher: Human Kinetics
ISBN: 1492526525
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 400
View: 6378
Sports in American History: From Colonization to Globalization, Second Edition, journeys from the early American past to the present to give students a compelling grasp of the evolution of American sporting practices.

    • History

Jews and Judaism in World History


Author: Howard N. Lupovitch
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135189641
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 1119
This book is a survey of the history of the Jewish people from biblical antiquity to the present, spanning nearly 2,500 years and traversing five continents. Opening with a broad introduction which addresses key questions of terminology and definition, the book’s ten chapters then go on to explore Jewish history in both its religious and non-religious dimensions. The book explores the social, political and cultural aspects of Jewish history, and examines the changes and continuities across the whole of the Jewish world throughout its long and varied history. Topics covered include: the emergence of Judaism as a religion and way of life the development during the Middle Ages of Judaism as an all-encompassing identity the effect on Jewish life and identity of major changes in Europe and the Islamic world from the mid sixteenth through the end of the nineteenth century the complexity of Jewish life in the twentieth century, the challenge of anti-semitism and the impact of the Holocaust, and the emergence of the current centres of World Jewry in the State of Israel and the New World.

    • Religion

Judaism and Hellenism

Studies in their Encounter in Palestine during the Early Hellenistic Period
Author: Martin Hengel
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1592441866
Category: Religion
Page: 666
View: 2146
Martin Hengel gathers an encyclopedic amount of material, ancient and modern, to present an exhaustive survey of the early course of Hellenistic civilization as it related to developing Judaism. The result is a highly readable account of a largely unfamiliar world which is indispensable for those interested in Judaism and the birth of Christianity alike. An extensive section of notes and bibliography is included.

    • Family & Relationships

Mishpachah

The Jewish Family in Tradition and in Transition
Author: Leonard J. Greenspoon
Publisher: Purdue University Press
ISBN: 1557537577
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 268
View: 6162
Contains papers presented at the 27th Annual Klutznick-Harris-Schwalb Symposium, October 26-27, 2014, in Omaha, Nebraska.

    • History

Jewish Culture and Society Under the Christian Roman Empire


Author: Richard Lee Kalmin,Seth Schwartz
Publisher: Peeters Publishers
ISBN: 9789042911819
Category: History
Page: 485
View: 7849
This book investigates the complexity, diversity, uniqueness and enduring significance of Jewish life in the Christian Roman Empire, from 312 to 634 C.E. During this period there occurred an unprecedented Jewish cultural explosion, encompassing the compilation and/or composition of such texts as the Palestinian Talmud, the main aggadic midrashim, an extensive magical/mystical literature, the revived apocalypse, a vast corpus of piyyutim and the beginnings of a practically oriented halakhic literature. Furthermore, this was the era of the florition of Jewish art, for it was only in the fourth century that a specifically Jewish iconographic language came into common use in synagogues and catacombs, the archaeological remains of almost all of which date from this period. This volume moves toward a synthesizing and contextualizing view of the Jewish cultural production of late antiquity, examining the interaction of Jews, Christians and pagans and with the emergence of new religious forms generated by such interaction.

    • Religion

Jews in the Early Modern World


Author: Dean Phillip Bell
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742545182
Category: Religion
Page: 301
View: 1183
Jews in the Early Modern World presents a comparative and global history of the Jews for the early modern period, 1400-1700. It traces the remarkable demographic changes experienced by Jews around the globe and assesses the impact of those changes on Jewish communal and social structures, religious and cultural practices, and relations with non-Jews.

    • Social Science

Judaism and Hellenism in Antiquity

Conflict or Confluence?
Author: Lee I. Levine
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295803827
Category: Social Science
Page: 248
View: 2575
Generations of scholars have debated the influence of Greco-Roman culture on Jewish society and the degree of its impact on Jewish material culture and religious practice in Palestine and the Diaspora of antiquity. Judaism and Hellenism in Antiquity examines this phenomenon from the aftermath of Alexander�s conquest to the Byzantine era, offering a balanced view of the literary, epigraphical, and archeological evidence attesting to the process of Hellenization in Jewish life and its impact on several aspects of Judaism as we know it today. Lee Levine approaches this broad subject in three essays, each focusing on diverse issues in Jewish culture: Jerusalem at the end of the Second Temple period, rabbinic tradition, and the ancient synagogue. With his comprehensive and thorough knowledge of the intricate dynamics of the Jewish and Greco-Roman societies, the author demonstrates the complexities of Hellenization and its role in shaping many aspects of Jewish life�economic, social, political, cultural, and religious. He argues against oversimplification and encourages a more nuanced view, whereby the Jews of antiquity survived and prospered, despite the social and political upheavals of this era, emerging as perpetuators of their own Jewish traditions while open to change from the outside world.

    • Religion

Food and Judaism


Author: Leonard Jay Greenspoon,Ronald Simkins,Gerald Shapiro
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781881871460
Category: Religion
Page: 345
View: 5014
Food is not simply a popularly imagined and well-known manifestation of Jewish culture. For Jews, food has been experienced as a means of exclusion, persecution, and assimilation by the larger society. Equally important, it has been an instrument of community, reparation, and renewal of identity. Food and Judaism presents a wide range of research on the history and interpretation of Jewish food practices and meanings. This volume covers a comprehensive array of topics, including American regional manifestations of food practices from little-known Jewish communities in cities such as contemporary Brighton Beach and Memphis; a social history of Jewish food in America by the renowned expert on Jewish food, Joan Nathan; and an examination of how the American food industry appealed to early twentieth-century Jews. Several discussions on the religious meaning and personal advantages of following a vegetarian lifestyle are considered from biblical and historical perspectives. A rescued cookbook text from the Theresienstadt concentration camp is juxtaposed with an examination of how garlic in Jewish cooking served as an anti-Semitic caricature in early modern Europe. Historical perspectives are also provided on the use of separate dishes for milk and meat, the sanctification of Hasidic foods in Eastern Europe, and "mystical satiation" as found in the medieval Kabbalah. Leonard J. Greenspoon is a professor of classical and Near Eastern studies and theology and holds the Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization at Creighton University. Ronald A. Simkins is an associate professor of theology and director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society at Creighton University. Gerald Shapiro is a professor of English at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

    • History

The history of the Jews in the Netherlands


Author: J. C. H. Blom,R. G. Fuks-Mansfeld,Ivo Schöffer
Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 508
View: 6618

    • Social Science

Unheroic Conduct

The Rise of Heterosexuality and the Invention of the Jewish Man
Author: Daniel Boyarin
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520210506
Category: Social Science
Page: 393
View: 7557
In a book that will both enlighten and provoke, Daniel Boyarin offers an alternative to the prevailing Euroamerican warrior/patriarch model of masculinity and recovers the Jewish ideal of the gentle, receptive male. The Western notion of the aggressive, sexually dominant male and the passive female reaches back through Freud to Roman times, but as Boyarin makes clear, such gender roles are not universal. Analyzing ancient and modern texts, he reveals early rabbis—studious, family-oriented—as exemplars of manhood and the prime objects of female desire in traditional Jewish society. Challenging those who view the "feminized Jew" as a pathological product of the Diaspora or a figment of anti-Semitic imagination, Boyarin argues that the Diaspora produced valuable alternatives to the dominant cultures' overriding gender norms. He finds the origins of the rabbinic model of masculinity in the Talmud, and though unrelentingly critical of rabbinic society's oppressive aspects, he shows how it could provide greater happiness for women than the passive gentility required by bourgeois European standards. Boyarin also analyzes the self-transformation of three iconic Viennese modern Jews: Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis; Theodor Herzl, the founder of Zionism; and Bertha Pappenheim (Anna O.), the first psychoanalytic patient and founder of Jewish feminism in Germany. Pappenheim is Boyarin's hero: it is she who provides him with a model for a militant feminist, anti-homophobic transformation of Orthodox Jewish society today. Like his groundbreaking Carnal Israel, this book is talmudic scholarship in a whole new light, with a vitality that will command attention from readers in feminist studies, history of sexuality, Jewish culture, and the history of psychoanalysis.

    • History

Neighboring Faiths

Christianity, Islam, and Judaism in the Middle Ages and Today
Author: David Nirenberg
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022616909X
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 835
Christianity, Judaism, and Islam are usually treated as autonomous religions, but in fact across the long course of their histories the three religions have developed in interaction with one another. In Neighboring Faiths, David Nirenberg examines how Muslims, Christians, and Jews lived with and thought about each other during the Middle Ages and what the medieval past can tell us about how they do so today. There have been countless scripture-based studies of the three “religions of the book,” but Nirenberg goes beyond those to pay close attention to how the three religious neighbors loved, tolerated, massacred, and expelled each other—all in the name of God—in periods and places both long ago and far away. Nirenberg argues that the three religions need to be studied in terms of how each affected the development of the others over time, their proximity of religious and philosophical thought as well as their overlapping geographies, and how the three “neighbors” define—and continue to define—themselves and their place in terms of one another. From dangerous attractions leading to interfaith marriage; to interreligious conflicts leading to segregation, violence, and sometimes extermination; to strategies for bridging the interfaith gap through language, vocabulary, and poetry, Nirenberg aims to understand the intertwined past of the three faiths as a way for their heirs to produce the future—together.

    • Religion

The Origin of the Jews

The Quest for Roots in a Rootless Age
Author: Steven Weitzman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400884934
Category: Religion
Page: 408
View: 2014
The first major history of the scholarly quest to answer the question of Jewish origins The Jews have one of the longest continuously recorded histories of any people in the world, but what do we actually know about their origins? While many think the answer to this question can be found in the Bible, others look to archaeology or genetics. Some skeptics have even sought to debunk the very idea that the Jews have a common origin. In this book, Steven Weitzman takes a learned and lively look at what we know—or think we know—about where the Jews came from, when they arose, and how they came to be. Scholars have written hundreds of books on the topic and have come up with scores of explanations, theories, and historical reconstructions, but this is the first book to trace the history of the different approaches that have been applied to the question, including genealogy, linguistics, archaeology, psychology, sociology, and genetics. Weitzman shows how this quest has been fraught since its inception with religious and political agendas, how anti-Semitism cast its long shadow over generations of learning, and how recent claims about Jewish origins have been difficult to disentangle from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He does not offer neatly packaged conclusions but invites readers on an intellectual adventure, shedding new light on the assumptions and biases of those seeking answers—and the challenges that have made finding answers so elusive. Spanning more than two centuries and drawing on the latest findings, The Origin of the Jews brings needed clarity and historical context to this enduring and often divisive topic.

    • History

Daily Life of the Jews in the Middle Ages


Author: Norman Roth
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313328657
Category: History
Page: 231
View: 7382
Discusses daily life of Jews during the Middle Ages, examining such topics as education, marriage, synagogues, religous customs and observances, occupations, medicine, and literature.

    • History

Unsettled

An Anthropology of the Jews
Author: Melvin Konner
Publisher: Viking Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 500
View: 1925
An anthropological analysis of the Jewish people and faith draws on archaeological findings, census data, religious texts, literature, and oral history to demonstrate how Jewish factors shaped the world and how the ongoing diaspora led to the rise of Jewish literacy, education, trade, and influence. 25,000 first printing.

    • Religion

Jewish People, Jewish Thought

The Jewish Experience in History
Author: Robert M. Seltzer
Publisher: Prentice Hall
ISBN: 9780024089403
Category: Religion
Page: 874
View: 9719
An extensive introduction to Jewish experience and thought combines social and political history and intellectual tradition and is complemented by historical photographs, illustrations of Jewish art, maps, and detailed chronological charts

    • History

Judaism on Trial

Jewish-Christian Disputations in the Middle Ages
Author: Hyam Maccoby
Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish
ISBN: 9781874774167
Category: History
Page: 245
View: 7614
This book focuses on the major Jewish-Chrisian disputations of medieval Europe: those of Paris (1240), Barcelona (1263), and Tortosa (1413-14).