• Medical

Modern Death

How Medicine Changed the End of Life
Author: Haider Warraich
Publisher: Gerald Duckworth & Co
ISBN: 0715652400
Category: Medical
Page: 336
View: 5870
Nothing is more certain in life than death. Yet recent advances in medicine and technology have dramatically increased our life expectancy, and everything about when, where, how and why we die has changed. The result is that dying is today a more prolonged and harrowing experience than ever before. In Modern Death, the physician and clinical researcher Haider Warraich draws on his expert personal experience as well as on history, culture, theology and legal theory, to tackle important ethical questions that go right to the heart of what it is to be human. He reveals what dying really means in today’s medical industrial complex, discusses the ethics of patient proxies, living wills and the right to die, and argues in favour of giving terminally ill patients the right to physician-assisted death. Written by an insightful, new voice in the conversation about death and dying, Modern Death is a heartfelt and inspiring book offering an unabashedly honest perspective, exploring how we can and must do better by the ones we love.

    • Medical

Modern Death

How Medicine Changed the End of Life
Author: Haider Warraich
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250104580
Category: Medical
Page: 336
View: 6966
There is no more universal truth in life than death. No matter who you are, it is certain that one day you will die, but the mechanics and understanding of that experience will differ greatly in today’s modern age. Dr. Haider Warraich is a young and brilliant new voice in the conversation about death and dying started by Dr. Sherwin Nuland’s classic How We Die: Reflections on Life’s Final Chapter, and Atul Gawande’s recent sensation, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. Dr. Warraich takes a broader look at how we die today, from the cellular level up to the very definition of death itself. The most basic aspects of dying—the whys, wheres, whens, and hows—are almost nothing like what they were mere decades ago. Beyond its ecology, epidemiology, and economics, the very ethos of death has changed. Modern Death, Dr. Warraich’s debut book, will explore the rituals and language of dying that have developed in the last century, and how modern technology has not only changed the hows, whens, and wheres of death, but the what of death. Delving into the vast body of research on the evolving nature of death, Modern Death will provide readers with an enriched understanding of how death differs from the past, what our ancestors got right, and how trends and events have transformed this most final of human experiences.

    • Social Science

Modern Death

How Medicine Changed the End of Life
Author: Haider Warraich
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250104599
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 1930
There is no more universal truth in life than death. No matter who you are, it is certain that one day you will die, but the mechanics and understanding of that experience will differ greatly in today’s modern age. Dr. Haider Warraich is a young and brilliant new voice in the conversation about death and dying started by Dr. Sherwin Nuland and Atul Gawande. Dr. Warraich takes a broader look at how we die today, from the cellular level up to the very definition of death itself. The most basic aspects of dying—the whys, wheres, whens, and hows—are almost nothing like what they were mere decades ago. Beyond its ecology, epidemiology, and economics, the very ethos of death has changed. Modern Death, Dr. Warraich’s debut book, will explore the rituals and language of dying that have developed in the last century, and how modern technology has not only changed the hows, whens, and wheres of death, but the what of death. Delving into the vast body of research on the evolving nature of death, Modern Death will provide readers with an enriched understanding of how death differs from the past, what our ancestors got right, and how trends and events have transformed this most final of human experiences.

    • Social Science

Embracing Our Mortality

Hard Choices in an Age of Medical Miracles
Author: Lawrence Schneiderman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199713158
Category: Social Science
Page: 232
View: 1246
While surveys show that most of us would prefer to die at home, 80% of us will die in a health care facility, many hooked up to machines and faced with tough decisions. When you, a family member, or a friend are in this situation, what should you do next? In Embracing Our Mortality, Dr. Lawrence J. Schneiderman, a physician who is our leading expert on medical ethics at the end of life, urges all of us, including health care professionals caring for people at the end of life, to face these decisions with sensitivity and realism informed by both the latest medical evidence as well as the oldest humanistic visions. Dr. Schneiderman vividly demonstrates the wisdom of this approach by interweaving true stories of his patients, current empirical research in care at the end of life, displays of the power of empathy and imagination as embodied in the work of writers like Tolstoy and Chekov, and examples of how the distortion of medical research by media, and its misunderstanding even by health care professionals, cloud the ability to think, feel, and decide clearly about mortal concerns. He ends by addressing the question implicit in all of this which is how to achieve a just and universal health care. Dr. Schneiderman proves a refreshingly honest, astringent, and life-affirming guide to thinking about the choices that we or people we love will face when we dienot if, as the technological imperatives of modern medicine can suggestand to making decisions at the end of life that respect all that has preceded it.

    • MEDICAL

Extreme Measures

Finding a Better Path to the End of Life
Author: Jessica Nutik Zitter
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101982551
Category: MEDICAL
Page: 338
View: 3770
In medical school, no one teaches you how to let a patient die. Currently, the old and the ill are intubated, catheterised, and even shelved away in care facilities to live out their final days alone, confused, and sometimes in pain. In her work, Zitter has learned to understand that what patients fear more than death itself is the prospect of dying alone. Filled with the kinds of rich patient stories that make the most compelling medical narratives, Extreme Measures thoughtfully and compassionately examines an experience that defines being human.

    • History

The Good Death


Author: Ann Neumann
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807076996
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 7867
"Following the death of her father, journalist and hospice volunteer Ann Neumann sets out to examine what it means to die well in the United States. If a good death exists, what does it look like? This question lies at the heart of Neumann's rigorously researched and intimately told journey along the ultimate borderland of American life: American death. From church basements to hospital wards to prison cells, Neumann charts the social, political, religious, and medical landscape to explore how we die today. The Good Death weaves personal accounts with a historical exploration of the movements and developments that have changed the ways we experience death. With the diligence of a journalist and the compassion of a caregiver, Neumann provides a portrait of death in the United States that is humane, beautifully written, and essential to our greater understanding of the future of end-of-life care"--

    • Philosophy

Ending Life

Ethics and the Way We Die
Author: Margaret Pabst Battin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195349870
Category: Philosophy
Page: 352
View: 3998
Margaret Pabst Battin has established a reputation as one of the top philosophers working in bioethics today. This work is a sequel to Battin's 1994 volume The Least Worst Death. The last ten years have seen fast-moving developments in end-of-life issues, from the legalization of physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and the Netherlands to furor over proposed restrictions of scheduled drugs used for causing death, and the development of "NuTech" methods of assistance in dying. Battin's new collection covers a remarkably wide range of end-of-life topics, including suicide prevention, AIDS, suicide bombing, serpent-handling and other religious practices that pose a risk of death, genetic prognostication, suicide in old age, global justice and the "duty to die," and suicide, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia, in both American and international contexts. As with the earlier volume, these new essays are theoretically adroit but draw richly from historical sources, fictional techniques, and ample factual material.

    • Social Science

The Way We Die Now

The View from Medicine's Front Line
Author: Seamus O'Mahony
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 125011280X
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 6028
We have lost the ability to deal with death. Most of our friends and beloved relations will die in a busy hospital in the care of strangers, doctors, and nurses they have known at best for a couple of weeks. They may not even know they are dying, victims of the kindly lie that there is still hope. They are unlikely to see even their family doctor in their final hours, robbed of their dignity and fed through a tube after a long series of excessive and hopeless medical interventions. This is the starting point of Seamus O’Mahony’s The Way We Die Now, a thoughtful, moving and unforgettable book on the western way of death. Dying has never been more public, with celebrities writing detailed memoirs of their illness, but in private we have done our best to banish all thought of dying and made a good death increasingly difficult to achieve.

    • Fiction

Auras of the Jinn

A Pakistani Story
Author: Haider Warraich
Publisher: Roli Books Private Limited
ISBN: 9351940039
Category: Fiction
Page: 288
View: 4463
Imran is a boy growing up in present-day Pakistan. His family is one amongst many in Mohajir Colony: his sisters work as maids, his father runs a motorcycle repair shop and his mother stays at home. Things change when there is a new visitor in the house - emerging from the dust of the railroad graveyard - as much a disease, a jinn, a drug, as a spiritual voice. The order of things is broken and everyone around Imran is hurled onto a trajectory of thought and action. The novel rests on the frail shoulders of ordinary people. Imran's eyes portray an unreal take on his society and the myriad people brushing past him. It is a living/breathing/kicking palette of Pakistan - a kaleidoscope with all the different characters serving as mirrors in the maze. Beneath the layers, a new subconscious state is revealed, which plays with real and imagined love, the experience of growing up in Pakistan and the detrimental, often absurd, ideals that form the basis of fundamentalism.

    • Medical

Death Before Dying


Author: Gary S. Belkin
Publisher: Oxford University Press (UK)
ISBN: 0199898170
Category: Medical
Page: 256
View: 3366
Brain death-the condition of a non-functioning brain, has been widely adopted around the world as a definition of death since it was detailed in a Report by an Ad Hoc Committee of Harvard Medical School faculty in 1968. It also remains a focus of controversy and debate, an early source of criticism and scrutiny of the bioethics movement. Death before Dying: History, Medicine, and Brain Death looks at the work of the Committee in a way that has not been attempted before in terms of tracing back the context of its own sources-the reasoning of it Chair, Henry K Beecher, and the care of patients in coma and knowledge about coma and consciousness at the time. That history requires re-thinking the debate over brain death that followed which has tended to cast the Committee's work in ways this book questions. This book, then, also questions common assumptions about the place of bioethics in medicine. This book discusses if the advent of bioethics has distorted and limited the possibilities for harnessing medicine for social progress. It challenges historical scholarship of medicine to be more curious about how medical knowledge can work as a potentially innovative source of values.

    • Biography & Autobiography

My Father's Wake

How the Irish Teach Us to Live, Love, and Die
Author: Kevin Toolis
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0306921456
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 5790
An intimate, lyrical look at the ancient rite of the Irish wake--and the Irish way of overcoming our fear of death Death is a whisper for most of us. Instinctively we feel we should dim the lights, pull the curtains, and speak softly. But on a remote island off the coast of Ireland's County Mayo, death has a louder voice. Each day, along with reports of incoming Atlantic storms, the local radio runs a daily roll call of the recently departed. The islanders go in great numbers, young and old alike, to be with their dead. They keep vigil with the corpse and the bereaved company through the long hours of the night. They dig the grave with their own hands and carry the coffin on their own shoulders. The islanders cherish the dead--and amid the sorrow, they celebrate life, too. In My Father's Wake, acclaimed author and award-winning filmmaker Kevin Toolis unforgettably describes his own father's wake and explores the wider history and significance of this ancient and eternal Irish ritual. Perhaps we, too, can all find a better way to deal with our mortality--by living and loving as the Irish do.

    • Social Science

A Good Death

Making the Most of Our Final Choices
Author: Sandra Martin
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 1443435988
Category: Social Science
Page: 400
View: 2992
We can’t avoid death, but the prospect is a lot less terrifying since the Supreme Court of Canada legalized physician-assisted death. Competent adults, suffering grievously from intolerable medical conditions, will have the right to ask for a doctor’s help in ending their lives. That much is clear. The challenge now is to pass legislation that reflects this landmark decision and develop regulations that reconcile the Charter rights of both doctors and patients. If we get the balance right between compassion for the suffering and protection of the vulnerable, between individual choice and social responsibility, we can set an example for the world. A Good Death is timely, engaging and inspiring. In taking on our ultimate human right, award-winning journalist Sandra Martin charts the history of the right to die movement here and abroad through the personal stories of brave campaigners like Sue Rodriguez, Brittany Maynard and Gloria Taylor. Martin weighs the evidence from permissive jurisdictions such as the Netherlands, Oregon, California, Switzerland and Quebec and portrays her own intellectual and emotional journey through the tangled legal, medical, religious and political documentation concerning terminal sedation, slippery slopes, and the sanctity of life. Modern death has become a wrenching political dilemma, one that becomes more pressing as the population ages. A Good Death confronts our fears about dying, our struggle for meaning, and our dread of being trapped by voracious medical technology in a nightmare world that has abandoned caring in pursuit of curing, no matter the cost or the suffering to patients and their families. A Good Death asks the tough question none of us can avoid: How do we want to die? The answer will change your life—and your death.

    • Medical

Remaking the American Patient

How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients into Consumers
Author: Nancy Tomes
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469622785
Category: Medical
Page: 560
View: 6607
In a work that spans the twentieth century, Nancy Tomes questions the popular--and largely unexamined--idea that in order to get good health care, people must learn to shop for it. Remaking the American Patient explores the consequences of the consumer economy and American medicine having come of age at exactly the same time. Tracing the robust development of advertising, marketing, and public relations within the medical profession and the vast realm we now think of as "health care," Tomes considers what it means to be a "good" patient. As she shows, this history of the coevolution of medicine and consumer culture tells us much about our current predicament over health care in the United States. Understanding where the shopping model came from, why it was so long resisted in medicine, and why it finally triumphed in the late twentieth century helps explain why, despite striking changes that seem to empower patients, so many Americans remain unhappy and confused about their status as patients today.

    • Health & Fitness

The Conversation

A Revolutionary Plan for End-of-Life Care
Author: Angelo E. Volandes,Angelo Volandes
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1620408546
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 240
View: 4247
Harvard Medical School physician Angelo Volandes offers a solution to traumatic end-of-life care: talking, medicine's oldest and least technological tool in the proverbial black bag.

    • Medical

In Search of Gentle Death

The Fight for Your Right to Die with Dignity
Author: Richard N. Côté
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781929175369
Category: Medical
Page: 42
View: 8372
In 2007, author Richard N. “Dick” Côté made the amazing discovery: that his former minister, a Unitarian, had been led by his work with AIDS-related activism to become an “exit counselor”; a person trained to educate the dying about their full range of options and be at their bedside if they had chosen a self-guided death. What he learned while helping his Harvard-educated friend avoid extradition to Ireland on an assisted suicide charge drew him into the underground world of those on the front lines of the battle to enable all people to die with dignity at the time, place, and under the conditions of their own choosing.An affiliation of forty-four organizations in twenty-five countries, the international right-to-die movement holds as its core belief that each person is inherently vested with the personal autonomy to make all the important decisions in his or her life. It promotes the concept that each of us should have the option of a humane, self-chosen death and that knowing a peaceful end is possible can enhance the celebration of life. Written in nontechnical language for a general audience and intensely documented for the scholar, Côté's book explores the modern history of the movement through the lives of its founders, leaders, and activists. Using international personal case histories, it also portrays the often heart-breaking conflict between the final wishes of those who are living or dying in pain and the religious, medical, and government authorities who will do anything to stop them from ending their own lives—and persecute those who help them.Côté based this unique book on five years of intensive primary source research and more than one hundred in-depth interviews with death-with-dignity pioneers, leaders, and exit guides on four continents. He is an award-winning author and social historian with more than twenty books to his credit, many of which received high marks from the most critical professional reviewers.

    • Medical

Defining Death

The Case for Choice
Author: Robert M. Veatch,Lainie F. Ross
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 1626163561
Category: Medical
Page: 168
View: 7914
New technologies and medical treatments have complicated questions such as how to determine the moment when someone has died. The result is a failure to establish consensus on the definition of death and the criteria by which the moment of death is determined. This creates confusion and disagreement not only among medical, legal, and insurance professionals but also within families faced with difficult decisions concerning their loved ones. Distinguished bioethicists Robert M. Veatch and Lainie F. Ross argue that the definition of death is not a scientific question but a social one rooted in religious, philosophical, and social beliefs. Drawing on history and recent court cases, the authors detail three potential definitions of death — the whole-brain concept; the circulatory, or somatic, concept; and the higher-brain concept. Because no one definition of death commands majority support, it creates a major public policy problem. The authors cede that society needs a default definition to proceed in certain cases, like those involving organ transplantation. But they also argue the decision-making process must give individuals the space to choose among plausible definitions of death according to personal beliefs. Taken in part from the authors' latest edition of their groundbreaking work on transplantation ethics, Defining Death is an indispensable guide for professionals in medicine, law, insurance, public policy, theology, and philosophy as well as lay people trying to decide when they want to be treated as dead.

    • Family & Relationships

Making Rounds with Oscar

The Extraordinary Gift of an Ordinary Cat
Author: David Dosa
Publisher: Hachette Books
ISBN: 1401394965
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 240
View: 6052
A remarkable cat. A life-changing story. Making Rounds with Oscar: The Extraordinary Gift of an Ordinary Cat is the story of a doctor who, at first, doesn't always listen; of the patients he serves; of their caregivers; and, most importantly, of a cat who teaches by example, embracing moments of life that so many of us shy away from. "Oscar has much to teach us about empathy and courage. I couldn't put it down." --Sara Gruen, author of Water for Elephants "This book is a must-read. Truly, this is a story that needs to be told." --Fresh Fiction "You'll be moved." --People "This touching and engaging book is a must-read for more than just cat lovers; anyone who enjoys a well-written and compelling story will find much to admire in its unlikely hero." --Publishers Weekly "[The] book, both touching and humorous, isn't just about Oscar. It's about listening and letting go." --USA Today

    • Medical

The Best Care Possible

A Physician's Quest to Transform Care Through the End of Life
Author: Ira Byock
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1583335129
Category: Medical
Page: 320
View: 9745
Dr. Byock, one of the foremost palliative care physicians in the country, argues that the way we die represents a national crisis. Though the vast majority of Americans would prefer to die peacefully, at home, many will spend their last days in a disease treatment system ruled by high-tech procedures and a philosophy to 'fight disease and illness at all costs.' Dr. Byock, puts a human face on the issue by telling richly moving stories - at once heartwrenching and uplifting - of people coping with the most difficult moments in their lives. As the pace of health care reform accelerates, he shows what truly excellent care can look like, and how wise and skilful doctors, nurses, and clinical teams can profoundly shape families' experiences of illness, caregiving, and loss. Told through page-turning life-or-death medical drama, The Best Care Possibleis a compelling and passionate meditation on medicine and ethics. It has the power to lead a new national conversation. 'Dr. Byock's mission is to help everyone . . . find meaning, dignity, and peace in these final months of life.' Prevention magazine'In this strikingly important book, Byock presents an agenda for end-of-life care that should serve as an ideal template on which to build out best hopes for the final days of those we love and of ourselves - and a corrective for our society.' Sherwin B. Nuland, MD, Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics; author of How We Die

    • Biography & Autobiography

When Breath Becomes Air


Author: Paul Kalanithi
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0812988418
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 256
View: 2532
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST • This inspiring, exquisitely observed memoir finds hope and beauty in the face of insurmountable odds as an idealistic young neurosurgeon attempts to answer the question What makes a life worth living? NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • People • NPR • The Washington Post • Slate • Harper’s Bazaar • Esquire • Time Out New York • Publishers Weekly • BookPage Finalist for the PEN Center USA Literary Award in Creative Nonfiction and the Books for a Better Life Award in Inspirational Memoir At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both. Praise for When Breath Becomes Air “I guarantee that finishing this book and then forgetting about it is simply not an option. . . . Part of this book’s tremendous impact comes from the obvious fact that its author was such a brilliant polymath. And part comes from the way he conveys what happened to him—passionately working and striving, deferring gratification, waiting to live, learning to die—so well.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times “An emotional investment well worth making: a moving and thoughtful memoir of family, medicine and literature. It is, despite its grim undertone, accidentally inspiring.”—The Washington Post “Possesses the gravity and wisdom of an ancient Greek tragedy . . . [Kalanithi] delivers his chronicle in austere, beautiful prose. The book brims with insightful reflections on mortality that are especially poignant coming from a trained physician familiar with what lies ahead.”—The Boston Globe “Devastating and spectacular . . . [Kalanithi] is so likeable, so relatable, and so humble, that you become immersed in his world and forget where it’s all heading.”—USA Today

    • Biography & Autobiography

A Very Easy Death


Author: Simone De Beauvoir
Publisher: Pantheon
ISBN: 0307832198
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 112
View: 9663
A Very Easy Death has long been considered one of Simone de Beauvoir’s masterpieces. The profoundly moving, day-by-day recounting of her mother’s death “shows the power of compassion when it is allied with acute intelligence” (The Sunday Telegraph). Powerful, touching, and sometimes shocking, this is an end-of-life account that no reader is likely to forget. From the Trade Paperback edition.