• History

Public Understanding of Science

A History of Communicating Scientific Ideas
Author: David Knight
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134624999
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 4588
Answering questions such as whether the interesting parts of science be conveyed in sermons, poems, pictures and journalism, Knight explores the history of science to show how the successes and failures of our ancestors can help us understand the position science comes to occupy now.

    • Industrial museums

Museums and the Public Understanding of Science


Author: John Durant,Science Museum (Great Britain),Committee on the Public Understanding of Science
Publisher: NMSI Trading Ltd
ISBN: 9780901805492
Category: Industrial museums
Page: 109
View: 5035
The essays in this volume are organised thematically. The first essay sets the scene by reviewing the present position and future potential of science museums as educational and cultural resources. The next section is devoted to the role of museum exhibitions and analyses how exhibitions deal with complex material. The third section is concerned with museum programmes and reports on the strengths and weaknesses of different museum programmes, ranging from gallery drama to the Boston Museum's innovative experiment with Science-by-mail.

    • Science

AS Science for Public Understanding


Author: Robin Millar
Publisher: Heinemann
ISBN: 9780435654665
Category: Science
Page: 250
View: 5857
Education policy encourages students to study a broad range of AS levels in their first post-16 year. The AS Science for Public Understanding course offers science for non-science specialists. This work aims to offer an understanding of science for those studying mainly arts A Levels.

    • Science

Inarticulate science?

perspectives on the public understanding of science and some implications for science education
Author: David Layton
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Science
Page: 159
View: 5363


    • Education

The Cunning of Uncertainty


Author: Helga Nowotny
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745687652
Category: Education
Page: 220
View: 5438
Uncertainty is interwoven into human existence. It is a powerful incentive in the search for knowledge and an inherent component of scientific research. We have developed many ways of coping with uncertainty. We make promises, manage risks and make predictions to try to clear the mists and predict ahead. But the future is inherently uncertain - and the mist that shrouds our path an inherent part of our journey. The burning question is whether our societies can face up to uncertainty, learn to embrace it and whether we can open up to a constantly evolving future. In this new book, Helga Nowotny shows how research can thrive at the cusp of uncertainty. Science, she argues, can eventually transform uncertainty into certainty, but into certainty which remains always provisional. Uncertainty is never completely static. It is constantly evolving. It encompasses geological time scales and, at the level of human experience, split-second changes as cells divide. Life and death decisions are taken in the blink of the eye, while human interactions with the natural environment may reveal their impact over millennia. Uncertainty is cunning. It appears at unexpected moments, it shuns the straight line, takes the oblique route and sometimes the unexpected short-cut. As we acknowledge the cunning of uncertainty, its threats retreat. We accept that any scientific inquiry must produce results that are provisional and uncertain. This message is vital for politicians and policy-makers: do not be tempted by small, short-term, controllable gains to the exclusion of uncertain, high-gain opportunities. Wide-ranging in its use of examples and enriched by the author’s experience as President of the European Research Council, one of the world’s leading funding organisations for fundamental research. The Cunning of Uncertainty is a must-read for students and scholars of all disciplines, politicians, policy-makers and anyone concerned with the fundamental role of knowledge and science in our societies today.

    • Science

Misunderstanding Science?

The Public Reconstruction of Science and Technology
Author: Alan Irwin,Brian Wynne
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521525206
Category: Science
Page: 232
View: 7453
A challenging new perspective on the nature of modern science and its relationship with the public.

    • Large print books

Science in Public

Communication, Culture, and Credibility
Author: Jane Gregory,Steve Miller
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1459608232
Category: Large print books
Page: 622
View: 6090
Does the general public need to understand science? And if so, is it scientists' responsibility to communicate? Critics have argued that, despite the huge strides made in technology, we live in a ''scientifically illiterate'' society--one that thinks about the world and makes important decisions without taking scientific knowledge into account. But is the solution to this ''illiteracy'' to deluge the layman with scientific information? Or does science news need to be focused around specific issues and organized into stories that are meaningful and relevant to people's lives? In this unprecedented, comprehensive look at a new field, Jane Gregory and Steve Miller point the way to a more effective public understanding of science in the years ahead.

    • Education

Science Literacy

Concepts, Contexts, and Consequences
Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,Board on Science Education,Committee on Science Literacy and Public Perception of Science
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309447569
Category: Education
Page: 166
View: 9198
Science is a way of knowing about the world. At once a process, a product, and an institution, science enables people to both engage in the construction of new knowledge as well as use information to achieve desired ends. Access to scienceâ€"whether using knowledge or creating itâ€"necessitates some level of familiarity with the enterprise and practice of science: we refer to this as science literacy. Science literacy is desirable not only for individuals, but also for the health and well- being of communities and society. More than just basic knowledge of science facts, contemporary definitions of science literacy have expanded to include understandings of scientific processes and practices, familiarity with how science and scientists work, a capacity to weigh and evaluate the products of science, and an ability to engage in civic decisions about the value of science. Although science literacy has traditionally been seen as the responsibility of individuals, individuals are nested within communities that are nested within societiesâ€"and, as a result, individual science literacy is limited or enhanced by the circumstances of that nesting. Science Literacy studies the role of science literacy in public support of science. This report synthesizes the available research literature on science literacy, makes recommendations on the need to improve the understanding of science and scientific research in the United States, and considers the relationship between scientific literacy and support for and use of science and research.

    • Social Science

Science, Social Theory & Public Knowledge


Author: Irwin, Alan,Michael, Mike
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 0335209475
Category: Social Science
Page: 175
View: 4032
This work draws together three key perspectives on science-society relations - public understanding of science, scientific and public governance, and social theory. It shows that 'science' and 'society' combine in many ways such as in citizenship, expertise, governance and democracy.

    • Science

American Eclipse: A Nation's Epic Race to Catch the Shadow of the Moon and Win the Glory of the World


Author: David Baron
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
ISBN: 1631490176
Category: Science
Page: 384
View: 1947
Richly illustrated and meticulously researched, American Eclipse ultimately depicts a young nation that looked to the skies to reveal its towering ambition and expose its latent genius. On a scorching July afternoon in 1878, at the dawn of the Gilded Age, the moon’s shadow descended on the American West, darkening skies from Montana Territory to Texas. This rare celestial event—a total solar eclipse—offered a priceless opportunity to solve some of the solar system’s most enduring riddles, and it prompted a clutch of enterprising scientists to brave the wild frontier in a grueling race to the Rocky Mountains. Acclaimed science journalist David Baron, long fascinated by eclipses, re-creates this epic tale of ambition, failure, and glory in a narrative that reveals as much about the historical trajectory of a striving young nation as it does about those scant three minutes when the blue sky blackened and stars appeared in mid-afternoon. In vibrant historical detail, American Eclipse animates the fierce jockeying that came to dominate late nineteenth-century American astronomy, bringing to life the challenges faced by three of the most determined eclipse chasers who participated in this adventure. James Craig Watson, virtually forgotten in the twenty-first century, was in his day a renowned asteroid hunter who fantasized about becoming a Gilded Age Galileo. Hauling a telescope, a star chart, and his long-suffering wife out west, Watson believed that he would discover Vulcan, a hypothesized "intra-Mercurial" planet hidden in the sun’s brilliance. No less determined was Vassar astronomer Maria Mitchell, who—in an era when women’s education came under fierce attack—fought to demonstrate that science and higher learning were not anathema to femininity. Despite obstacles erected by the male-dominated astronomical community, an indifferent government, and careless porters, Mitchell courageously charged west with a contingent of female students intent on observing the transcendent phenomenon for themselves. Finally, Thomas Edison—a young inventor and irrepressible showman—braved the wilderness to prove himself to the scientific community. Armed with his newest invention, the tasimeter, and pursued at each stop by throngs of reporters, Edison sought to leverage the eclipse to cement his place in history. What he learned on the frontier, in fact, would help him illuminate the world. With memorable accounts of train robberies and Indian skirmishes, David Baron’s page-turning drama refracts nineteenth-century science through the mythologized age of the Wild West, revealing a history no less fierce and fantastical.

    • Psychology

The Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication


Author: Kathleen Hall Jamieson,Dan Kahan,Dietram A. Scheufele
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190497629
Category: Psychology
Page: 512
View: 4919
The proposal to vaccinate adolescent girls against the human papilloma virus ignited political controversy, as did the advent of fracking and a host of other emerging technologies. These disputes attest to the persistent gap between expert and public perceptions. Complicating the communication of sound science and the debates that surround the societal applications of that science is a changing media environment in which misinformation can elicit belief without corrective context and likeminded individuals are prone to seek ideologically comforting information within their own self-constructed media enclaves. Drawing on the expertise of leading science communication scholars from six countries, The Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication not only charts the media landscape - from news and entertainment to blogs and films - but also examines the powers and perils of human biases - from the disposition to seek confirming evidence to the inclination to overweight endpoints in a trend line. In the process, it draws together the best available social science on ways to communicate science while also minimizing the pernicious effects of human bias. The Handbook adds case studies exploring instances in which communication undercut or facilitated the access to scientific evidence. The range of topics addressed is wide, from genetically engineered organisms and nanotechnology to vaccination controversies and climate change. Also unique to this book is a focus on the complexities of involving the public in decision making about the uses of science, the regulations that should govern its application, and the ethical boundaries within which science should operate. The Handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers in the communication fields, particularly in science and health communication, as well as to scholars involved in research on scientific topics susceptible to distortion in partisan debate.

    • Science

When science meets the public

proceedings of a workshop organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science Committee on Public Understanding of Science and Technology, February 17, 1991, Washington, DC
Author: American Association for the Advancement of Science. Committee on Public Understanding of Science and Technology
Publisher: Amer Assn for the Advancement of
ISBN: N.A
Category: Science
Page: 164
View: 5317

    • Political Science

Between Understanding and Trust

The Public, Science and Technology
Author: Meinolf Dierkes,Claudia von Grote
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135288062
Category: Political Science
Page: 398
View: 9544
'This is a welcome book. The issues of public understanding of science open many questions. What does "understanding" mean? How does understanding translate into attitudes towards science and trust in scientists? What is the role of the mass media? The essays in this book shed light on such questions bringing insights from several disciplines. They help to define a meaningful research agenda for the future. - Professor Dorothy Nelkin, New York University


    • Social Science

Social Networks and Popular Understanding of Science and Health

Sharing Disparities
Author: Brian G. Southwell
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421413256
Category: Social Science
Page: 152
View: 3870
Using social media and peer-to-peer networks to teach people about science and health may seem like an obvious strategy. Yet recent research suggests that systematic reliance on social networks may be a recipe for inequity. People are not consistently inclined to share information with others around them, and many people are constrained by factors outside of their immediate control. Ironically, the highly social nature of humankind complicates the extent to which we can live in a society united solely by electronic media. Stretching well beyond social media, this book documents disparate tendencies in the ways people learn and share information about health and science. By reviewing a wide array of existing research—ranging from a survey of New Orleans residents in the weeks after Hurricane Katrina to analysis of Twitter posts related to H1N1 to a physician-led communication campaign explaining the benefits of vaginal birth—Brian Southwell explains why some types of information are more likely to be shared than others and how some people never get exposed to seemingly widely available information. This book will appeal to social science students and citizens interested in the role of social networks in information diffusion and yet it also serves as a cautionary tale for communication practitioners and policymakers interested in leveraging social ties as an inexpensive method to spread information. -- K. "Vish" Viswanath, Harvard School of Public Health and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

    • Language Arts & Disciplines

Communicating Science

New Agendas in Communication
Author: LeeAnn Kahlor,Patricia Stout
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135269793
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 288
View: 8090
This volume explores the evolution of science communication, addressing key issues and offering substance for future study. Harnessing the energies of junior scholars on the forefront of science communication, this work pushes the boundaries of research forward, allowing scholars to sample the multiple paradigms and agendas that will play a role in shaping the future of science communication. Editors LeeAnn Kahlor and Patricia Stout challenge their readers to channel the energy within these chapters to build or continue to build their own research agendas as all scholars work together – across disciplines – to address questions of public understanding of science and communicating science. These chapters are intended to inspire still more research questions, to help aspiring science communication scholars locate their own creative and original research programs, and to help veteran science communication scholars expand their existing programs such that they can more actively build interdisciplinary bridges. Crossing methodological boundaries, work from quantitative and qualitative scholars, social scientists and rhetoricians is represented here. This volume is developed for practitioners and scholars alike – for anyone who is concerned about or interested in the future of science and how communication is shaping and will continue to shape that future. In its progressive pursuit of interdisciplinary research streams – of thinking outside methodological and theoretical boxes – this book inspires science communication scholars at all levels to set a new standard for collaboration not just for science communication, but for communication research in general.