• Social Science

Self-Identity and Everyday Life


Author: Harvie Ferguson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134255810
Category: Social Science
Page: 214
View: 7279
'Identity' and 'selfhood' are terms routinely used throughout the human sciences that seek to analyze and describe the character of everyday life and experience. Yet these terms are seldom defined or used with any precision, and scant regard is paid to the historical and cultural context in which they arose, or to which they are applied. This innovative book provides fresh historical insights in terms of the emergence, development, and interrelationship of specific and varied notions of identity and selfhood, and outlines a new sociological framework for analyzing it. This is the first historical/sociological framework for discussion of issues which have until now, generally been treated as 'philosophy' or 'psychology', and as such it is essential reading for those undergraduates and postgraduates of sociology, philosophy and history and cultural studies interested in the concepts of identity and self. It covers a broader range of material than is usual in this style of text, and includes a survey of relevant literature and precise analysis of key concepts written in a student-friendly style.

    • Social Science

Concepts of the Self


Author: Anthony Elliott
Publisher: Polity
ISBN: 0745661890
Category: Social Science
Page: 200
View: 2428
More than ten years on from its original publication, Concepts of the Self still mesmerizes with its insight, comprehensiveness and critique of debates over the self in the social sciences and humanities. Anthony Elliott has written a new preface to this third edition to address some of the most recent developments in the field, and offers a powerful challenge to what he describes as ‘the emergence of anti-theories of the self’. The first two editions have proven exceptionally popular among students and teachers worldwide. Anthony Elliott provides a scintillating introduction to the major accounts of the self from symbolic interactionism and psychoanalysis to post-feminism and postmodernism. This new edition has been extensively revised and updated to take account of more recent theoretical developments, and a new chapter has been added on individualization which focuses on how the self becomes an agent of ‘do-it-yourself’ autobiographical reconstruction in an age of intensive globalization. Concepts of the Self remains the most lively, lucid and compelling introduction to contemporary controversies over the self and self-identity in the social sciences and humanities. Written by an author of international reputation, it connects debates about the self directly to identity politics, the sociology of personal relationships and intimacy, and the politics of sexuality, and will continue to be an invaluable introductory text for students in of social and political theory, sociology, social psychology, cultural studies, and gender studies.

    • Social Science

Ethnicity and Everyday Life


Author: Christian Karner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134198566
Category: Social Science
Page: 188
View: 7457
Mixing theories of the everyday with a wide range of case studies, this book explains the 'character' of ethnicity, from being a political tool of exclusion, to a source of meaning and solidarity, and the relationship between culture, power and identity. Combining theories of the everyday with empirical case studies, this book examines: the 'dual character' of ethnicity – as a political tool of exclusion and source of meaning/ solidarity respectively the relationship between culture, power and identity the significance of historical/socio-economic contexts to ethnicity and everyday life. This book addresses many important questions through a critical application of theories of the everyday to a series of case studies that include travellers, the South Asian diaspora, contemporary Austria, and asylum seekers in 'Fortress Europe'. This book provides an accessible and coherent introduction to the sociology of ethnicity and will be essential reading for undergraduate students on cultural studies, race and ethnic studies, and sociology courses.

    • Psychology

Modernity and Self-identity

Self and Society in the Late Modern Age
Author: Anthony Giddens
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804719445
Category: Psychology
Page: 256
View: 1620
Modernity differs from all preceding forms of social order because of its dynamism, its deep undercutting of traditional habits and customs, and its global impact. It also radicallly alters the general nature of daily life and the most personal aspects of human activity. In fact, one of the most distinctive features of modernity is the increasing interconnection between globalizing influences and personal dispositions. The author analyzes the nature of this interconnection and provides a conceptual vocabulary for it, in the process providing a major rethinking of the nature of modernity and a reworking of basic premises of sociological analysis. Building on the ideas set out in the authors The Consequences of Modernity, this book focuses on the self and the emergence of new mechanisms of self-identity that are shaped by—yet also shape—the institutions of modernity. The author argues that the self is not a passive entity, determined by external influences. Rather, in forging their self-identities, no matter how local their contexts of action, individuals contribute to and directly promote social influences that are global in their consequences and implications. The author sketches the contours of the he calls "high modernity"—the world of our day—and considers its ramifications for the self and self-identity. In this context, he analyzes the meaning to the self of such concepts as trust, fate, risk, and security and goes on the examine the "sequestration of experience," the process by which high modernity separates day-to-day social life from a variety of experiences and broad issues of morality. The author demonstrates how personal meaninglessness—the feeling that life has nothing worthwhile to offer—becomes a fundamental psychic problem in circumstances of high modernity. The book concludes with a discussion of "life politics," a politics of selfactualization operating on both the individual and collective levels.

    • Social Science

The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life


Author: Erving Goffman
Publisher: Peter Smith Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9780844670171
Category: Social Science
Page: 259
View: 5588

    • Social Science

The Terminal Self

Everyday Life in Hypermodern Times
Author: Simon Gottschalk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317022351
Category: Social Science
Page: 146
View: 6039
Living at the dawn of a digital twenty-first century, people living in Western societies spend an increasing amount of time interacting with a terminal and interacting with others at the terminal. Because the self emerges out of interaction with others (humans and non-humans), this increasingly pervasive and mandatory interaction with terminals prompts a ‘terminal self’—a nexus of social and psychological orientations that are adjusted to the terminal logic. In order to trace the terminal self’s profile, the book examines how five unique ‘default settings’ of the terminal incite particular adjustments in users that transform their perceptions of reality, their experiences of self, and their relations with others. Combining traditional interactionist theory, Goffman’s dramaturgy, and the French hypermodern approach, using examples from everyday life and popular culture, the book examines these adjustments, their manifestations, consequences, and resonance with broader trends of a hypermodern society organized by the ‘digital apparatus.’ Suggesting that these adjustments infantilize users, the author proposes strategies to confront three interrelated risks faced by the terminal self and society. These risks pertain to users’ subjectivity and need for recognition, to their declining abilities in face-to-face interactions, and to their dwindling abilities to retain control over terminal technologies. An accessibly written examination of the transformation of the self in the digital age, The Terminal Self will appeal to scholars of sociology, social psychology, and cultural studies with interests in digital cultures, new technologies, social interaction, and conceptions of identity.

    • Psychology

Identity

Sociological Perspectives
Author: Steph Lawler
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745673384
Category: Psychology
Page: 208
View: 2426
Questions about who we are, who we can be, and who is like and unlike us underpin a vast range of contemporary social issues. What makes our families so important to us? What do the often stark differences between how we self-identify and the way others see and define us reveal about our social world? Why do we attach such significance to 'being ourselves'? In this new edition of her popular and inviting introduction, Steph Lawler examines a range of important debates about identity. Taking a sociological perspective, she shows how identity is produced and embedded in social relationships, and worked out in the practice of people's everyday lives. She challenges the perception of identity as belonging within the person, arguing instead that it is produced and negotiated between persons. Chapter-by-chapter her book explores topics such as the relationships between lives and life-stories, the continuing significance of kinship in the face of social change, and how taste works to define identity. In particular, the updated edition has a new chapter on identity politics, as well as carefully compiled guides for further reading that reflect the broad importance and impact of these ideas, and the fact that, without understanding identity, we can't adequately begin to understand the social world. This book is essential reading for upper-level courses across the social sciences that focus on the compelling issues surrounding identity.

    • Psychology

Stigma

Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity
Author: Erving Goffman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439188330
Category: Psychology
Page: 168
View: 5619
From the author of The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Stigma is analyzes a person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to people whom society calls “normal.” Stigma is an illuminating excursion into the situation of persons who are unable to conform to standards that society calls normal. Disqualified from full social acceptance, they are stigmatized individuals. Physically deformed people, ex-mental patients, drug addicts, prostitutes, or those ostracized for other reasons must constantly strive to adjust to their precarious social identities. Their image of themselves must daily confront and be affronted by the image which others reflect back to them. Drawing extensively on autobiographies and case studies, sociologist Erving Goffman analyzes the stigmatized person’s feelings about himself and his relationship to “normals” He explores the variety of strategies stigmatized individuals employ to deal with the rejection of others, and the complex sorts of information about themselves they project. In Stigma the interplay of alternatives the stigmatized individual must face every day is brilliantly examined by one of America’s leading social analysts.

    • Psychology

Social and Personal Identity

Understanding Yourself
Author: Derek Layder
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761944898
Category: Psychology
Page: 167
View: 8847
Analyses where a person's views, attitudes, values come from and why they change?

    • Social Science

Self, Identity, and Social Institutions


Author: D. Heise,N. MacKinnon
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230108490
Category: Social Science
Page: 264
View: 575
This book shows how the individual constructs a self from the thousands of colloquial identities provided by a society's culture, and reveals how the individual actualizes and sustains an integrated and stable self while navigating the sometimes treacherous waters of everyday institutional life.

    • Social Science

Introducing Sociology Using the Stuff of Everyday Life


Author: Josee Johnston,Kate Cairns,Shyon Baumann
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317690672
Category: Social Science
Page: 476
View: 7461
The challenges of teaching a successful introductory sociology course today demand materials from a publisher very different from the norm. Texts that are organized the way the discipline structures itself intellectually no longer connect with the majority of student learners. This is not an issue of pandering to students or otherwise seeking the lowest common denominator. On the contrary, it is a question of again making the practice of sociological thinking meaningful, rigorous, and relevant to today’s world of undergraduates. This comparatively concise, highly visual, and affordable book offers a refreshingly new way forward to reach students, using one of the most powerful tools in a sociologist’s teaching arsenal—the familiar stuff in students’ everyday lives throughout the world: the jeans they wear to class, the coffee they drink each morning, or the phones their professors tell them to put away during lectures. A focus on consumer culture, seeing the strange in the familiar, is not only interesting for students; it is also (the authors suggest) pedagogically superior to more traditional approaches. By engaging students through their stuff, this book moves beyond teaching about sociology to helping instructors teach the practice of sociological thinking. It moves beyond describing what sociology is, so that students can practice what sociological thinking can do. This pedagogy also posits a relationship between teacher and learner that is bi-directional. Many students feel a sense of authority in various areas of consumer culture, and they often enjoy sharing their knowledge with fellow students and with their instructor. Opening up the sociology classroom to discussion of these topics validates students’ expertise on their own life-worlds. Teachers, in turn, gain insight from the goods, services, and cultural expectations that shape students’ lives. While innovative, the book has been carefully crafted to make it as useful and flexible as possible for instructors aiming to build core sociological foundations in a single semester. A map on pages ii–iii identifies core sociological concepts covered so that a traditional syllabus as well as individual lectures can easily be maintained. Theory, method, and active learning exercises in every chapter constantly encourage the sociological imagination as well as the "doing" of sociology.

    • Social Science

National Identity, Popular Culture and Everyday Life


Author: Tim Edensor
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1350030287
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 4835
The Millennium Dome, Braveheart and Rolls Royce cars. How do cultural icons reproduce and transform a sense of national identity? How does national identity vary across time and space, how is it contested, and what has been the impact of globalization upon national identity and culture?This book examines how national identity is represented, performed, spatialized and materialized through popular culture and in everyday life. National identity is revealed to be inherent in the things we often take for granted - from landscapes and eating habits, to tourism, cinema and music. Our specific experience of car ownership and motoring can enhance a sense of belonging, whilst Hollywood blockbusters and national exhibitions provide contexts for the ongoing, and often contested, process of national identity formation. These and a wealth of other cultural forms and practices are explored, with examples drawn from Scotland, the UK as a whole, India and Mauritius. This book addresses the considerable neglect of popular cultures in recent studies of nationalism and contributes to debates on the relationship between 'high' and 'low' culture.

    • Social Science

Sociology

Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life
Author: David M. Newman
Publisher: Pine Forge Press
ISBN: 1412961521
Category: Social Science
Page: 547
View: 4364
DISCOUNTED BUNDLE SAVES YOUR STUDENTS MONEY!This book is available bundled with Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life Readings, Seventh Edition (bundle ISBN: 978-1-4129-6151-6) The Seventh Edition of David NewmanÆs Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life invites students to delve into the fascinating world of sociological thought. Encouraging students to think more about how sociology applies to their everyday lives, this edition features updated coverage and fresh examples, including revamped micro-macro connections to help students understand the link between individual lives and the structure of society. New to the Seventh Edition Presents new and updated coverage throughout, including new sections on Muslim-Americans, global warming, and sexual orientationFeatures NewmanÆs signature compelling writing style with slightly briefer chapters and integrated global content in each for a better fit with todayÆs courses Provides a more robust research methods section with innovative discussions of spuriousness in research, reading a research article correctly, and more, plus a new ôDoing Social Researchö feature Offers new examples from the myriad U.S. subcultures to engage students with examples that are relevant to their lives Features new and updated Micro-Macro Connections, including technology and erosion of privacy, the global health divide, and more, to help students make the link between their daily lives and the architecture of society Includes fresh examples and updated statistical information throughout the text, along with new exhibits and impactful visual essays Ancillaries InstructorÆs Resources on CD-Rom are available to qualified instructors. Contact SAGE at [email protected] or 1.800.818.7243 to request a copy.Student study site û COMING SOON - at www.pineforge.com/newman7study Intended AudienceThis core text is designed for students enrolled in Introduction to Sociology and Principles of Sociology courses in departments of sociology.

    • Social Science

Identity Theory


Author: Peter J. Burke,Jan E. Stets
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199889112
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 6632
The concept of identity has become widespread within the social and behavioral sciences in recent years, cutting across disciplines from psychiatry and psychology to political science and sociology. All individuals claim particular identities given their roles in society, groups they belong to, and characteristics that describe themselves. Introduced almost 30 years ago, identity theory is a social psychological theory that attempts to understand identities, their sources in interaction and society, their processes of operation, and their consequences for interaction and society from a sociological perspective. This book describes identity theory, its origins, the research that supports it, and its future direction. It covers the relation between identity theory and other related theories, as well as the nature and operation of identities. In addition, the book discusses the multiple identities individuals hold from their multiple positions in society and organizations as well as the multiple identities activated by many people interacting in groups and organizations. And, it covers the manner in which identities offer both stability and change to individuals. Written in an accessible style, Identity Theory makes, step by step, the full range of this powerful new theory understandable to readers at all levels.

    • Social Science

Culture and Everyday Life


Author: David Inglis
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415319263
Category: Social Science
Page: 159
View: 8996
This lively and accessible new book reconsiders the different views as to what 'culture' is, how it operates, and how it relates to other aspects of the human (and non-human) world.

    • Social Science

Community and Everyday Life


Author: Graham Day
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134327366
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 7414
'Community' continues to be a persistent theme in political, philosophical and policy debates. The idea of community poses fundamental questions about social inclusion and exclusion, particular versus general interests, identity and belonging. As well as extensive theoretical literature in the social sciences, there is a rich body of social research aimed at exploring the nature of community, and evaluating its contribution to people's lives and well-being. Drawing on a wealth of international empirical examples and illustrations, this book reviews debates surrounding the idea of community. It examines changing patterns of community life and evaluates their importance for society and for individuals. As well as urban, rural and class-based communities, it explores other contemporary forms of community, such as social movements, communes and 'virtual' gatherings in cyberspace. Truly multidisciplinary, this book will be of interest to students of sociology, geography, political science and social policy and welfare. Grounded in a wide-ranging review of empirical research, it provides an overview of sociological debates surrounding the idea of community and relating them to the part community plays in people's everyday conceptions of identity.

    • Religion

Religion and Everyday Life


Author: Stephen Hunt
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134265484
Category: Religion
Page: 204
View: 3365
This introductory text explores the historical and contemporary relevance of religion to social life, through an examination of practice and belief. Author Hunt reconsiders how theories and concepts are lived at the level of selfhood and cultural identity, through religious and spiritual belief. At the same time he looks at contemporary changes in religious life and how these are impacted by socialization, institutional belonging, and belief, and at the significance of class, gender, age and ethnicity. Individual chapters cover a range of issues, such as: religion, identity and community secularization and pluralism traditional Christianity: change and continuity globalization and the global context religion and ethnicity. The text challenges much current sociological thought and deals with contemporary Christianity, a range of world faiths and new and developing expressions of religion and spirituality. With tables and diagrams to illustrate key points and trends, it provides an accessible and captivating introduction to the sociology of religion.

    • Business & Economics

Consumption and Everyday Life


Author: Mark Paterson
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415355070
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 252
View: 1056
Introducing all the key ideas and major theorists of consumption in a lively and engaging manner, this book draws on theories of everyday life and aspects of sociology, cultural geography and cultural studies, and presents a comprehensive exploration of the central themes in consumption and consumer culture. Readily accessible case studies describe familiar forms of consumption from areas of everyday life, grounding the debates and ideas discussed. Key topics covered include: the semiotics of branding and advertising the representation of 'nature' and the environment the relations between consumer and producer ethical consumption the tensions between local spaces of consumption and globalized markets. While each of the chapters crystallize the debate in a specific subject area, they also lie within a larger argument concerning the ethics, the poetics and the politics of consumption in everyday life, making this essential reading for undergraduates on cultural studies, sociology and cultural geography courses.

    • Social Science

Ethnicity and Everyday Life


Author: Christian Karner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134198566
Category: Social Science
Page: 188
View: 2588
Mixing theories of the everyday with a wide range of case studies, this book explains the 'character' of ethnicity, from being a political tool of exclusion, to a source of meaning and solidarity, and the relationship between culture, power and identity. Combining theories of the everyday with empirical case studies, this book examines: the 'dual character' of ethnicity – as a political tool of exclusion and source of meaning/ solidarity respectively the relationship between culture, power and identity the significance of historical/socio-economic contexts to ethnicity and everyday life. This book addresses many important questions through a critical application of theories of the everyday to a series of case studies that include travellers, the South Asian diaspora, contemporary Austria, and asylum seekers in 'Fortress Europe'. This book provides an accessible and coherent introduction to the sociology of ethnicity and will be essential reading for undergraduate students on cultural studies, race and ethnic studies, and sociology courses.

    • Social Science

Risk, Vulnerability and Everyday Life


Author: Iain Wilkinson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134198000
Category: Social Science
Page: 136
View: 4104
It is now sociological common sense to declare that, in everyday life, large numbers of people approach matters of work, family life, trust and friendship with 'risk' constantly in mind. This book, provides an introductory overview and critical assessment of this phenomenon. Iain Wilkinson outlines contrasting sociological theories of risk, and summarizes some of the principle discoveries of empirical research conducted into the ways people perceive, experience and respond to a world of danger. He also examines some of the moral concerns and political interests that feature in this area of study. Designed to equip readers not only with the sociological means to debate the human consequences of our contemporary culture of risk, but also, with the critical resources to evaluate the significance this holds for current sociology, this book provides a perfectly pitched undergraduate introduction to the topic.