• Science

Society, Culture and the Auditory Imagination in Modern France

The Humanity of Hearing
Author: I. Sykes
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137455357
Category: Science
Page: 169
View: 8762
This book examines the striking way in which medical and scientific work on hearing in 18th and 19th-century France helped to shape modern French society and culture. The author argues that of all the senses hearing offered the greatest resources for remodelling the idea of the universal human condition within the modern French historical setting.

    • Music

Musicology: The Key Concepts


Author: David Beard,Kenneth Gloag
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131729808X
Category: Music
Page: 376
View: 6005
Now in an updated 2nd edition, Musicology: The Key Concepts is a handy A-Z reference guide to the terms and concepts associated with contemporary musicology. Drawing on critical theory with a focus on new musicology, this updated edition contains over 35 new entries including: Autobiography Music and Conflict Deconstruction Postcolonialism Disability Music after 9/11 Masculinity Gay Musicology Aesthetics Ethnicity Interpretation Subjectivity With all entries updated, and suggestions for further reading throughout, this text is an essential resource for all students of music, musicology, and wider performance related humanities disciplines.

    • History

The History of Emotions


Author: Rob Boddice
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1526126001
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 5810
This book introduces students and professional historians to the main areas of concern in the history of emotions. It discusses how the emotions intersect with other lines of historical research relating to power, practice, society and morality. Addressing criticism from within and without the discipline of history, the book offers a rigorous defence of this new approach, demonstrating its potential centrality to historiographical practice, as well as the importance of this kind of historical work for our general understanding of the human brain and the meaning of human experience.

    • Disability studies

The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies


Author: Stephanie Jensen-Moulton,Joseph Straus,Neil Lerner
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199331448
Category: Disability studies
Page: 952
View: 4884
Disability is a broad, heterogeneous, and porous identity, and that diversity is reflected in the variety of bodily conditions under discussion here, including autism and intellectual disability, deafness, blindness, and mobility impairment often coupled with bodily deformity. Cultural Disability Studies has, from its inception, been oriented toward physical and sensory disabilities, and has generally been less effective in dealing with cognitive and intellectual impairments and with the sorts of emotions and behaviors that in our era are often medicalized as "mental illness." In that context, it is notable that so many of these essays are centrally concerned with madness, that broad and ever-shifting cultural category. There is also in impressive diversity of subject matter including YouTube videos, Ghanaian drumming, Cirque du Soleil, piano competitions, castrati, medieval smoking songs, and popular musicals. Amid this diversity of time, place, style, medium, and topic, the chapters share two core commitments.0First, they are united in their theoretical and methodological connection to Disability Studies, especially its central idea that disability is a social and cultural construction. Disability both shapes and is shaped by culture, including musical culture. Second, these essays individually and collectively make the case that disability is not something at the periphery of culture and music, but something central to our art and to our humanity.

    • History

Sounds of Modern History

Auditory Cultures in 19th- and 20th-Century Europe
Author: Daniel Morat
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782384227
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 2575
Long ignored by scholars in the humanities, sound has just begun to take its place as an important object of study in the last few years. Since the late 19th century, there has been a paradigmatic shift in auditory cultures and practices in European societies. This change was brought about by modern phenomena such as urbanization, industrialization and mechanization, the rise of modern sciences, and of course the emergence of new sound recording and transmission media. This book contributes to our understanding of modern European history through the lens of sound by examining diverse subjects such as performed and recorded music, auditory technologies like the telephone and stethoscope, and the ambient noise of the city.

    • Social Science

Talking and Listening in the Age of Modernity

Essays on the History of Sound
Author: Joy Damousi,Desley Deacon
Publisher: ANU E Press
ISBN: 192131348X
Category: Social Science
Page: 187
View: 2896
Issued also in printed form.

    • History

The Thaw

Soviet Society and Culture during the 1950s and 1960s
Author: Denis Kozlov,Eleonory Gilburd
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442618957
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 463
The period from Stalin’s death in 1953 to the end of the 1960s marked a crucial epoch in Soviet history. Though not overtly revolutionary, this era produced significant shifts in policies, ideas, language, artistic practices, daily behaviours, and material life. It was also during this time that social, cultural, and intellectual processes in the USSR began to parallel those in the West (and particularly in Europe) as never before. This volume examines in fascinating detail the various facets of Soviet life during the 1950s and 1960s, a period termed the ‘Thaw.’ Featuring innovative research by historical, literary, and film scholars from across the world, this book helps to answer fundamental questions about the nature and ultimate fortune of the Soviet order – both in its internal dynamics and in its long-term and global perspectives.

    • Medical

Hearing Voices

The Histories, Causes and Meanings of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations
Author: Simon McCarthy-Jones
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107007224
Category: Medical
Page: 457
View: 4139
A comprehensive exploration of the history, phenomenology, meanings and causes of hearing voices that others cannot hear (auditory verbal hallucinations).

    • Biography & Autobiography

Sugar in the Blood

A Family's Story of Slavery and Empire
Author: Andrea Stuart
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307474542
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 353
View: 8000
Presents a history of the interdependence of sugar, slavery, and colonial settlement in the New World through the story of the author's ancestors, exploring the myriad connections between sugar cultivation and her family's identity, genealogy, and financial stability.

    • Foreign Language Study

Contemporary French cultures and societies


Author: Frédéric Royall
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Inc
ISBN: N.A
Category: Foreign Language Study
Page: 421
View: 2019
Designed to cater for the growing interest in French studies, this volume assembles contributions about various aspects of change in a number of contemporary French-speaking societies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the book expands on the traditional concepts of French studies focusing on language and literature and embraces politics, economics and cultural studies. The volume is divided into four parts and includes contributions from leading European specialists. Collectively, the contributions span the broad fields of Politics and Society, Arts and Culture, the French Language, and Francophone Literatures. Individual chapters review and analyse contemporary issues, debates and developments in the contributors' specialist areas. The contributions address the many requirements of undergraduate and postgraduate students in French Studies which makes this collection of essays of considerable value to the specialist reader as well as to those looking for a more general understanding of keycontemporary issues in French Studies.

    • Music

The Cultural Study of Music

A Critical Introduction
Author: Martin Clayton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136754326
Category: Music
Page: 376
View: 8860
First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

    • Psychology

Sweet Anticipation

Music and the Psychology of Expectation
Author: David Brian Huron
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262083450
Category: Psychology
Page: 462
View: 1300
A theory of expectations is used to explain how music evokes various emotions; for readers interested in cognitive science and evolutionary psychology as well as music.

    • Medical

The Ear Book

A Complete Guide to Ear Disorders and Health
Author: Thomas J. Balkany,Kevin D. Brown
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421422867
Category: Medical
Page: 256
View: 5395
Intricately shaped and amazingly sensitive, ears are the organs of hearing and balance. When something goes wrong with the ears—whether infection or cancer, eardrum perforation or hearing loss—our overall well-being is generally disturbed. In The Ear Book, Drs. Thomas J. Balkany and Kevin D. Brown, recognized experts on ears and hearing, explain how the anatomy of the ear facilitates hearing and balance and then examine the causes, symptoms, and treatment of common problems of the outer, middle, and inner ear. Their explanations take the mystery out of hearing aids, the proper care of ears, and how the pressurized conditions of scuba diving and air travel affect the ears. And they debunk ear-related myths—from the notion that exposure to loud noise strengthens the ear to the idea that tinnitus can be cured with nutrients—and urge readers to stop using ear candling or Q-tips to get rid of wax. Drs. Balkany and Brown address such common questions as: Can dizziness be cured? How loud is too loud? Why do my ears ring? Do cochlear implants work for nerve deafness? What promise do innovations in gene therapy and stem cell therapy hold for the future? Fully illustrated and including helpful tables, hearing preservation tips, a glossary of terms, lists of ear medications and resources, and suggestions for further reading, The Ear Book is sure to be a welcome family guide.

    • Science

Hallucinations


Author: Oliver Sacks
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030795725X
Category: Science
Page: 336
View: 404
Have you ever seen something that wasn’t really there? Heard someone call your name in an empty house? Sensed someone following you and turned around to find nothing? Hallucinations don’t belong wholly to the insane. Much more commonly, they are linked to sensory deprivation, intoxication, illness, or injury. People with migraines may see shimmering arcs of light or tiny, Lilliputian figures of animals and people. People with failing eyesight, paradoxically, may become immersed in a hallucinatory visual world. Hallucinations can be brought on by a simple fever or even the act of waking or falling asleep, when people have visions ranging from luminous blobs of color to beautifully detailed faces or terrifying ogres. Those who are bereaved may receive comforting “visits” from the departed. In some conditions, hallucinations can lead to religious epiphanies or even the feeling of leaving one’s own body. Humans have always sought such life-changing visions, and for thousands of years have used hallucinogenic compounds to achieve them. As a young doctor in California in the 1960s, Oliver Sacks had both a personal and a professional interest in psychedelics. These, along with his early migraine experiences, launched a lifelong investigation into the varieties of hallucinatory experience. Here, with his usual elegance, curiosity, and compassion, Dr. Sacks weaves together stories of his patients and of his own mind-altering experiences to illuminate what hallucinations tell us about the organization and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture’s folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all, a vital part of the human condition.

    • Art

Color in the Age of Impressionism

Commerce, Technology, and Art
Author: Laura Anne Kalba
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271079789
Category: Art
Page: 288
View: 5365
This study analyzes the impact of color-making technologies on the visual culture of nineteenth-century France, from the early commercialization of synthetic dyes to the Lumière brothers’ perfection of the autochrome color photography process. Focusing on Impressionist art, Laura Anne Kalba examines the importance of dyes produced in the second half of the nineteenth century to the vision of artists such as Edgar Degas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Claude Monet. The proliferation of vibrant new colors in France during this time challenged popular understandings of realism, abstraction, and fantasy in the realms of fine art and popular culture. More than simply adding a touch of spectacle to everyday life, Kalba shows, these bright, varied colors came to define the development of a consumer culture increasingly based on the sensual appeal of color. Impressionism—emerging at a time when inexpensively produced color functioned as one of the principal means by and through which people understood modes of visual perception and signification—mirrored and mediated this change, shaping the ways in which people made sense of both modern life and modern art. Demonstrating the central importance of color history and technologies to the study of visuality, Color in the Age of Impressionism adds a dynamic new layer to our understanding of visual and material culture.

    • Psychology

Encyclopedia of psychology


Author: Raymond J. Corsini,Bonnie Davis Ozaki
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: N.A
Category: Psychology
Page: N.A
View: 1786
"Reference source for psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, sociologists, anthropologists, and other professionals who do research in human behavior." With approximately 2,150 entries (1,500 subjects; 650 persons), some twenty-four are on psychology throughout the world, as well as biographical entries of deceased and living contributors to psychology. Encyclopedia may be consulted for ready reference, summary, or textbook information. Entries give name or subject, dates, discussion, cross references, references, and name of author. Volume 4 consists of bibliography of 24,521 items, name index, and subject index.

    • History

Radio and the Politics of Sound in Interwar France, 1921-1939


Author: Rebecca Scales
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107108675
Category: History
Page: 322
View: 8825
In December 1921, France broadcast its first public radio programme from a transmitter on the Eiffel Tower, and in the decade that followed, radio evolved into a mass media capable of reaching millions. Urban crowds flocked to loudspeakers on city streets to listen to propaganda, children clustered around classroom radios, and families tuned in from their living rooms. Radio and the Politics of Sound in Interwar France surveys the impact of this emerging auditory culture on the dynamics of French politics to reveal how it served as a new platform for political engagement, transforming the act of listening into an important, if highly contested, practice of citizenship. Rejecting models of radio as a weapon of totalitarian regimes or for forging democracy from above, the book surveys radio's resonances in French culture and society to offer a more nuanced picture of the impact of broadcasting on politics between the world wars.


    • Science

Mechanical Sound

Technology, Culture, and Public Problems of Noise in the Twentieth Century
Author: Karin Bijsterveld
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262026392
Category: Science
Page: 350
View: 7351
Tracing efforts to control unwanted sound--the noise of industry, city traffic, gramophones and radios, and aircraft--from the late nineteenth to the late twentieth century.

    • Literary Criticism

Voice in Motion

Staging Gender, Shaping Sound in Early Modern England
Author: Gina Bloom
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812201310
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 288
View: 4322
Voice in Motion explores the human voice as a literary, historical, and performative motif in early modern English drama and culture, where the voice was frequently represented as struggling, even failing, to work. In a compelling and original argument, Gina Bloom demonstrates that early modern ideas about the efficacy of spoken communication spring from an understanding of the voice's materiality. Voices can be cracked by the bodies that produce them, scattered by winds when transmitted as breath through their acoustic environment, stopped by clogged ears meant to receive them, and displaced by echoic resonances. The early modern theater underscored the voice's volatility through the use of pubescent boy actors, whose vocal organs were especially vulnerable to malfunction. Reading plays by Shakespeare, Marston, and their contemporaries alongside a wide range of late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century texts—including anatomy books, acoustic science treatises, Protestant sermons, music manuals, and even translations of Ovid—Bloom maintains that cultural representations and theatrical enactments of the voice as "unruly matter" undermined early modern hierarchies of gender. The uncontrollable physical voice creates anxiety for men, whose masculinity is contingent on their capacity to discipline their voices and the voices of their subordinates. By contrast, for women the voice is most effective not when it is owned and mastered but when it is relinquished to the environment beyond. There, the voice's fragile material form assumes its full destabilizing potential and becomes a surprising source of female power. Indeed, Bloom goes further to query the boundary between the production and reception of vocal sound, suggesting provocatively that it is through active listening, not just speaking, that women on and off the stage reshape their world. Bringing together performance theory, theater history, theories of embodiment, and sound studies, this book makes a significant contribution to gender studies and feminist theory by challenging traditional conceptions of the links among voice, body, and self.