• Social Science

The Deportation Regime

Sovereignty, Space, and the Freedom of Movement
Author: Nicholas De Genova,Nathalie Peutz
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822391341
Category: Social Science
Page: 520
View: 4521
This important collection examines deportation as an increasingly global mechanism of state control. Anthropologists, historians, legal scholars, and sociologists consider not only the physical expulsion of noncitizens but also the social discipline and labor subordination resulting from deportability, the threat of forced removal. They explore practices and experiences of deportation in regional and national settings from the U.S.-Mexico border to Israel, and from Somalia to Switzerland. They also address broader questions, including the ontological significance of freedom of movement; the historical antecedents of deportation, such as banishment and exile; and the development, entrenchment, and consequences of organizing sovereign power and framing individual rights by territory. Whether investigating the power that individual and corporate sponsors have over the fate of foreign laborers in Bahrain, the implications of Germany’s temporary suspension of deportation orders for pregnant and ill migrants, or the significance of the detention camp, the contributors reveal how deportation reflects and reproduces notions about public health, racial purity, and class privilege. They also provide insight into how deportation and deportability are experienced by individuals, including Arabs, South Asians, and Muslims in the United States. One contributor looks at asylum claims in light of an unusual anti-deportation campaign mounted by Algerian refugees in Montreal; others analyze the European Union as an entity specifically dedicated to governing mobility inside and across its official borders. The Deportation Regime addresses urgent issues related to human rights, international migration, and the extensive security measures implemented by nation-states since September 11, 2001. Contributors: Rutvica Andrijasevic, Aashti Bhartia, Heide Castañeda , Galina Cornelisse , Susan Bibler Coutin, Nicholas De Genova, Andrew M. Gardner, Josiah Heyman, Serhat Karakayali, Sunaina Marr Maira, Guillermina Gina Nuñez, Peter Nyers, Nathalie Peutz, Enrica Rigo, Victor Talavera, William Walters, Hans-Rudolf Wicker, Sarah S. Willen

    • Law

The Deportation Regime

Sovereignty, Space, and the Freedom of Movement
Author: Nicholas De Genova,Nathalie Peutz
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822345765
Category: Law
Page: 507
View: 7506
A collection exploring practices and experiences of deportation, and the threat of deportation, in regional and national settings from the U.S.-Mexico border to Israel, and from Somalia to Switzerland.

    • Social Science

The Borders of "Europe"

Autonomy of Migration, Tactics of Bordering
Author: Nicholas De Genova
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822372665
Category: Social Science
Page: 376
View: 9830
In recent years the borders of Europe have been perceived as being besieged by a staggering refugee and migration crisis. The contributors to The Borders of "Europe" see this crisis less as an incursion into Europe by external conflicts than as the result of migrants exercising their freedom of movement. Addressing the new technologies and technical forms European states use to curb, control, and constrain what contributors to the volume call the autonomy of migration, this book shows how the continent's amorphous borders present a premier site for the enactment and disputation of the very idea of Europe. They also outline how from Istanbul to London, Sweden to Mali, and Tunisia to Latvia, migrants are finding ways to subvert visa policies and asylum procedures while negotiating increasingly militarized and surveilled borders. Situating the migration crisis within a global frame and attending to migrant and refugee supporters as well as those who stoke nativist fears, this timely volume demonstrates how the enforcement of Europe’s borders is an important element of the worldwide regulation of human mobility. Contributors. Ruben Andersson, Nicholas De Genova, Dace Dzenovska, Evelina Gambino, Glenda Garelli, Charles Heller, Clara Lecadet, Souad Osseiran, Lorenzo Pezzani, Fiorenza Picozza, Stephan Scheel, Maurice Stierl, Laia Soto Bermant, Martina Tazzioli

    • Social Science

Working the Boundaries

Race, Space, and “Illegality” in Mexican Chicago
Author: Nicholas De Genova
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822387093
Category: Social Science
Page: 348
View: 9001
While Chicago has the second-largest Mexican population among U.S. cities, relatively little ethnographic attention has focused on its Mexican community. This much-needed ethnography of Mexicans living and working in Chicago examines processes of racialization, labor subordination, and class formation; the politics of nativism; and the structures of citizenship and immigration law. Nicholas De Genova develops a theory of “Mexican Chicago” as a transnational social and geographic space that joins Chicago to innumerable communities throughout Mexico. “Mexican Chicago” is a powerful analytical tool, a challenge to the way that social scientists have thought about immigration and pluralism in the United States, and the basis for a wide-ranging critique of U.S. notions of race, national identity, and citizenship. De Genova worked for two and a half years as a teacher of English in ten industrial workplaces (primarily metal-fabricating factories) throughout Chicago and its suburbs. In Working the Boundaries he draws on fieldwork conducted in these factories, in community centers, and in the homes and neighborhoods of Mexican migrants. He describes how the meaning of “Mexican” is refigured and racialized in relation to a U.S. social order dominated by a black-white binary. Delving into immigration law, he contends that immigration policies have worked over time to produce Mexicans as the U.S. nation-state’s iconic “illegal aliens.” He explains how the constant threat of deportation is used to keep Mexican workers in line. Working the Boundaries is a major contribution to theories of race and transnationalism and a scathing indictment of U.S. labor and citizenship policies.

    • Law

Immigration Detention and Human Rights

Rethinking Territorial Sovereignty
Author: Galina Cornelisse
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004173706
Category: Law
Page: 388
View: 7551
Practices of immigration detention in Europe are largely resistant to conventional forms of legal correction. By rethinking the notion of territorial sovereignty in modern constitutionalism, this book puts forward a solution to the problem of legally permissive immigration detention.

    • History

Barrio Libre

Criminalizing States and Delinquent Refusals of the New Frontier
Author: Gilberto Rosas
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822352370
Category: History
Page: 188
View: 4217
The city of Nogales straddles the border between Sonora, Mexico, and Arizona. On the Mexican side, a group of marginalized youth calling themselves Barrio Libre (Free 'Hood) employs violence, theft, and bribery to survive, often preying on undocumented migrants using the city's sewer system to cross the border. In this book, Gilberto Rosas draws on his in-depth ethnographic research among the Barrio Libre to understand how the gang operates, why its members have embraced criminality, and the role that neoliberalism and security policies on both sides of the border have played in the youth's descent into Barrio Libre. Rosas argues that although these youth participate in the victimization of others, they should not be demonized. They are complexly and adversely situated. Many are migrants driven to Nogales by the effects of NAFTA. Shadowing the youths through the spaces they inhabit and control, he shows how the militarization of the border actually destabilized the region and led Barrio Libre to turn to even more violent activities like drug trafficking. By focusing this population and their thickening delinquency, Rosas asserts the importance of capitalism and criminality in shaping of perceptions and realities of race, sovereignty, and resistance along the U.S./Mexico border.

    • Social Science

Illegality, Inc.

Clandestine Migration and the Business of Bordering Europe
Author: Ruben Andersson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520958284
Category: Social Science
Page: 360
View: 5429
In this groundbreaking ethnography, Ruben Andersson, a gifted anthropologist and journalist, travels along the clandestine migration trail from Senegal and Mali to the Spanish North African enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla. Through the voices of his informants, Andersson explores, viscerally and emphatically, how Europe’s increasingly powerful border regime meets and interacts with its target–the clandestine migrant. This vivid, rich work examines the subterranean migration flow from Africa to Europe, and shifts the focus from the "illegal immigrants" themselves to the vast industry built around their movements. This fascinating and accessible book is a must-read for anyone interested in the politics of international migration and the changing texture of global culture.

    • History

Migrants for Export

How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World
Author: Robyn Magalit Rodriguez
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452915210
Category: History
Page: 194
View: 2430
Migrant workers from the Philippines are ubiquitous to global capitalism, with nearly 10 percent of the population employed in almost two hundred countries. In a visit to the United States in 2003, Philippine president Gloria Macapagal Arroyo even referred to herself as not only the head of state but also “the CEO of a global Philippine enterprise of eight million Filipinos who live and work abroad.†Robyn Magalit Rodriguez investigates how and why the Philippine government transformed itself into what she calls a labor brokerage state, which actively prepares, mobilizes, and regulates its citizens for migrant work abroad. Filipino men and women fill a range of jobs around the globe, including domestic work, construction, and engineering, and they have even worked in the Middle East to support U.S. military operations. At the same time, the state redefines nationalism to normalize its citizens to migration while fostering their ties to the Philippines. Those who leave the country to work and send their wages to their families at home are treated as new national heroes. Drawing on ethnographic research of the Philippine government's migration bureaucracy, interviews, and archival work, Rodriguez presents a new analysis of neoliberal globalization and its consequences for nation-state formation.

    • Social Science

Shadowed Lives: Undocumented Immigrants in American Society


Author: Leo R. Chavez
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285402502
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 3812
One of the few case studies of undocumented immigrants available, this insightful anthropological analysis humanizes a group of people too often reduced to statistics and stereotypes. The hardships of Hispanic migration are conveyed in the immigrants' own voices while the author's voice raises questions about power, stereotypes, settlement, and incorporation into American society. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

    • Social Science

A Companion to Border Studies


Author: Thomas M. Wilson,Hastings Donnan
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118255259
Category: Social Science
Page: 636
View: 2897
A Companion to Border Studies introduces an exciting and expanding field of interdisciplinary research, through the writing of an international array of scholars, from diverse perspectives that include anthropology, development studies, geography, history, political science and sociology. Explores how nations and cultural identities are being transformed by their dynamic, shifting borders where mobility is sometimes facilitated, other times impeded or prevented Offers an array of international views which together form an authoritative guide for students, instructors and researchers Reflects recent significant growth in the importance of understanding the distinctive characteristics of borders and frontiers, including cross-border cooperation, security and controls, migration and population displacements, hybridity, and transnationalism

    • Social Science

Returned

Going and Coming in an Age of Deportation
Author: Deborah Boehm
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520962214
Category: Social Science
Page: 200
View: 1882
Returned follows transnational Mexicans as they experience the alienation and unpredictability of deportation, tracing the particular ways that U.S. immigration policies and state removals affect families. Deportation—an emergent global order of social injustice—reaches far beyond the individual deportee, as family members with diverse U.S. immigration statuses, including U.S. citizens, also return after deportation or migrate for the first time. The book includes accounts of displacement, struggle, suffering, and profound loss but also of resilience, flexibility, and imaginings of what may come. Returned tells the story of the chaos, and design, of deportation and its aftermath.

    • History

Dangerous Pregnancies

Mothers, Disabilities, and Abortion in Modern America
Author: Leslie J. Reagan
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520274571
Category: History
Page: 392
View: 657
“Compellingly attentive to medical and legal structures, but also to dramatic human choices, Dangerous Pregnancies provides a boldly argued and carefully documented historical grounding for critical debates in public policy and women’s rights.”—David Roediger, author of How Race Survived U.S. History "Both a gripping story of the activism of middle-class mothers and an insightful study of abortion law reform, Dangerous Pregnancies is a compelling argument about reproductive rights, immunization, and the public health power of the state. A terrific book."—Molly Ladd-Taylor, author of "Bad" Mothers: The Politics of Blame in Twentieth-Century America and Mother-Work: Women, Child Welfare, and the State, 1890-1930. "Accessible and clearly written, Reagan's illuminating account of German measles is immensely valuable both in itself and as a window into larger issues of gender, public health, and bioethics."—Charles Rosenberg, author of The Cholera Years and No Other Gods: On Science and American Social Thought

    • Political Science

The Imperative of Integration


Author: Elizabeth Anderson
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400836826
Category: Political Science
Page: 264
View: 8938
More than forty years have passed since Congress, in response to the Civil Rights Movement, enacted sweeping antidiscrimination laws in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. As a signal achievement of that legacy, in 2008, Americans elected their first African American president. Some would argue that we have finally arrived at a postracial America, but The Imperative of Integration indicates otherwise. Elizabeth Anderson demonstrates that, despite progress toward racial equality, African Americans remain disadvantaged on virtually all measures of well-being. Segregation remains a key cause of these problems, and Anderson skillfully shows why racial integration is needed to address these issues. Weaving together extensive social science findings--in economics, sociology, and psychology--with political theory, this book provides a compelling argument for reviving the ideal of racial integration to overcome injustice and inequality, and to build a better democracy. Considering the effects of segregation and integration across multiple social arenas, Anderson exposes the deficiencies of racial views on both the right and the left. She reveals the limitations of conservative explanations for black disadvantage in terms of cultural pathology within the black community and explains why color blindness is morally misguided. Multicultural celebrations of group differences are also not enough to solve our racial problems. Anderson provides a distinctive rationale for affirmative action as a tool for promoting integration, and explores how integration can be practiced beyond affirmative action. Offering an expansive model for practicing political philosophy in close collaboration with the social sciences, this book is a trenchant examination of how racial integration can lead to a more robust and responsive democracy.

    • Social Science

Latino Crossings

Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and the Politics of Race and Citizenship
Author: Nicholas De Genova,Ana Yolanda Ramos-Zayas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113595237X
Category: Social Science
Page: 268
View: 7329
First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

    • Music

Duke Ellington's America


Author: Harvey G. Cohen
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226112659
Category: Music
Page: 704
View: 2267
Few American artists in any medium have enjoyed the international and lasting cultural impact of Duke Ellington. From jazz standards such as “Mood Indigo” and “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore,” to his longer, more orchestral suites, to his leadership of the stellar big band he toured and performed with for decades after most big bands folded, Ellington represented a singular, pathbreaking force in music over the course of a half-century. At the same time, as one of the most prominent black public figures in history, Ellington demonstrated leadership on questions of civil rights, equality, and America’s role in the world. With Duke Ellington’s America, Harvey G. Cohen paints a vivid picture of Ellington’s life and times, taking him from his youth in the black middle class enclave of Washington, D.C., to the heights of worldwide acclaim. Mining extensive archives, many never before available, plus new interviews with Ellington’s friends, family, band members, and business associates, Cohen illuminates his constantly evolving approach to composition, performance, and the music business—as well as issues of race, equality and religion. Ellington’s own voice, meanwhile, animates the book throughout, giving Duke Ellington’s America an intimacy and immediacy unmatched by any previous account. By far the most thorough and nuanced portrait yet of this towering figure, Duke Ellington’s America highlights Ellington’s importance as a figure in American history as well as in American music.

    • Political Science

Migration and Integration

New Models for Mobility and Coexistence
Author: Roland Hsu,Christoph Reinprecht
Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
ISBN: 3847004743
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 696
Globalization has led to new forms, and dynamics, of migration and mobility. What are the consequences of these changes for the processes of reception, settlement and social integration, for social cohesion, institutional practices and policies? The essays collected in this volume discuss these issues with reference to recent research on migration and mobility in Europe, the US, North and East Africa and South and Southeast Asia. The twenty authors are leading migration researcher from different academic fields such as sociology, geography, political science and cultural studies.

    • Arab Spring, 2010-

Spaces in Migration

Postcards of a Revolution
Author: Martina Tazzioli,Federica Sossi,Glenda Garelli
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780957147010
Category: Arab Spring, 2010-
Page: 230
View: 7655
December 17, 2010 - January 14, 2011. These dates have been fixed as the beginning and completion of a revolution which took the world by surprise, opening up a sudden and peculiar spatial upheaval. Mohamed Bouazizi's gesture, setting himself on fire, was an extreme one. Immediately following this act, squares and streets started to fill up, from Tunisia to Tahrir square, to Sana'a, to Tripoli and to Damascus. The revolutions that originated were revolutions against political dictatorships and against dictatorship over people's lives, against the way poverty was rendered invisible and against unbearable existences. These revolutionary struggles staged an unprecedented capacity for common action based on a logic of 'spatial takeover.' These existences decided to stand up and be counted, taking over streets, squares, Kasbas, medinas, taking up their freedom, the freedom to be, to go, to be noticed at last. They did so forming an uncontainable movement, from Tunis to Cairo, from Maghreb to Mashreq. From Tunisia to Europe. These 'Arab Revolutions' and, the one that sparked in Tunisia in particular, have not followed just one direction in their 'spatial takeover.' They have also managed to fill a series of European spaces with existences and bodies: streets, islands, stations, parks; from Lampedusa to Paris, crossing the sea in an unexpected and sudden capacity to unify two shores and two continents, hence erasing centuries of history, acting on and performing the 'natural' proximity of these shores. Spaces in Migration: Postcards of a Revolution attempts to rearticulate some of the images of what happened starting from December 17, 2010, sketching a necessarily fragmented story, a series of postcards, and piecing together fragments of before- and after- moments, following the spaces in migration of this revolution. 'Spaces in Migration is a compelling read, which brings together a plethora of voices while making a decisive intervention in debates about migration in the wake of the Tunisian revolution. Voices that sorely need to be heard find space in this book. Deftly combining analysis with rich empirical detail, the authors succeed in highlighting critical dimensions of the revolution as well as key problems of contemporary migration and humanitarian regimes.' - Vicki Squire, Associate Professor of International Security, University of Warwick, UK 'Spaces in Migration is an intellectual eruption - the eruption of the Arab Spring, and the Tunisian Revolution in particular, into the critical study of migration and borders. Combining the very nuanced analyses of the Italian scholar-activist contributors with the transcripts of their interviews with Tunisian migrants and their families, and also with refugees from various African countries encamped in the borderzone between Libya and Tunisia, this book provides a poignant exploration of how the autonomous subjectivity of migrants can radically destabilize the logics of border control.' - Nicholas De Genova, co-editor of The Deportation Regime: Sovereignty, Space, and the Freedom of Movement (Duke University Press, 2010)

    • Philosophy

States Without Nations

Citizenship for Mortals
Author: Jacqueline Stevens
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231148771
Category: Philosophy
Page: 364
View: 6961
As citizens, we hold certain truths to be self-evident: that the rights to own land, marry, inherit property, and especially to assume birthright citizenship should be guaranteed by the state. The laws promoting these rights appear not only to preserve our liberty but to guarantee society remains just. Yet considering how much violence and inequality results from these legal mandates, Jacqueline Stevens asks whether we might be making the wrong assumptions. Would a world without such laws be more just? Arguing that the core laws of the nation-state are more about a fear of death than a desire for freedom, Jacqueline Stevens imagines a world in which birthright citizenship, family inheritance, state-sanctioned marriage, and private land ownership are eliminated. Would chaos be the result? Drawing on political theory and history and incorporating contemporary social and economic data, she brilliantly critiques our sentimental attachments to birthright citizenship, inheritance, and marriage and highlights their harmful outcomes, including war, global apartheid, destitution, family misery, and environmental damage. It might be hard to imagine countries without the rules of membership and ownership that have come to define them, but as Stevens shows, conjuring new ways of reconciling our laws with the condition of mortality reveals the flaws of our present institutions and inspires hope for moving beyond them.

    • Law

Us and Them?

The Dangerous Politics of Immigration Control
Author: Bridget Anderson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199691592
Category: Law
Page: 209
View: 1347
Us and Them? explores the distinction between migrant and citizen through using the concept of 'the community of value'. The challenges of migration go to the heart of equality, rights, freedom, and membership. These are not only matters for migrants but go to the heart of citizens' politics.