• History

The Greeks

A Portrait of Self and Others
Author: Paul Cartledge
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191577839
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 3969
This book provides an original and challenging answer to the question: 'Who were the Classical Greeks?' Paul Cartledge - 'one of the most theoretically alert, widely read and prolific of contemporary ancient historians' (TLS) - here examines the Greeks and their achievements in terms of their own self-image, mainly as it was presented by the supposedly objective historians: Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon. Many of our modern concepts as we understand them were invented by the Greeks: for example, democracy, theatre, philosophy, and history. Yet despite being our cultural ancestors in many ways, their legacy remains rooted in myth and the mental and material contexts of many of their achievements are deeply alien to our own ways of thinking and acting. The Greeks aims to explore in depth how the dominant group (adult, male, citizen) attempted, with limited success, to define themselves unambiguously in polar opposition to a whole series of 'Others' - non-Greeks, women, non-citizens, slaves and gods. This new edition contains an updated bibliography, a new chapter entitled 'Entr'acte: Others in Images and Images of Others', and a new afterword.

    • History

Ancient Greek Political Thought in Practice


Author: Paul Cartledge
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 113948849X
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 9622
Ancient Greece was a place of tremendous political experiment and innovation, and it was here too that the first serious political thinkers emerged. Using carefully selected case-studies, in this book Professor Cartledge investigates the dynamic interaction between ancient Greek political thought and practice from early historic times to the early Roman Empire. Of concern throughout are three major issues: first, the relationship of political thought and practice; second, the relevance of class and status to explaining political behaviour and thinking; third, democracy - its invention, development and expansion, and extinction, prior to its recent resuscitation and even apotheosis. In addition, monarchy in various forms and at different periods and the peculiar political structures of Sparta are treated in detail over a chronological range extending from Homer to Plutarch. The book provides an introduction to the topic for all students and non-specialists who appreciate the continued relevance of ancient Greece to political theory and practice today.

    • Social Science

Greeks and Barbarians


Author: Kostas Vlassopoulos
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107244269
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 5669
This book is an ambitious synthesis of the social, economic, political and cultural interactions between Greeks and non-Greeks in the Mediterranean world during the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods. Instead of traditional and static distinctions between Greeks and Others, Professor Vlassopoulos explores the diversity of interactions between Greeks and non-Greeks in four parallel but interconnected worlds: the world of networks, the world of apoikiai ('colonies'), the Panhellenic world and the world of empires. These diverse interactions set into motion processes of globalisation; but the emergence of a shared material and cultural koine across the Mediterranean was accompanied by the diverse ways in which Greek and non-Greek cultures adopted and adapted elements of this global koine. The book explores the paradoxical role of Greek culture in the processes of ancient globalisation, as well as the peculiar way in which Greek culture was shaped by its interaction with non-Greek cultures.

    • History

The Last Pagans of Rome


Author: Alan Cameron
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 019974727X
Category: History
Page: 878
View: 7404
--Book Jacket.

    • History

Balkan Identities

Nation and Memory
Author: Maria Todorova
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814782798
Category: History
Page: 374
View: 7448
Balkan Identities brings together historians, anthropologists, and literary scholars all working under the shared conviction that the only way to overcome history is to intimately understand it. The contributors of Balkan Identities focus on historical memory, collective national memory, and the political manipulation of national identities. They refine our understanding of memory and identity in general and explore and assess the significance of particular manifestations of Balkan national identities and national memories in the region. The essays in Balkan Identities grapple with three major problems: the construction of historical memory, sites of national memory, and the mobilization of national identities. While most essays focus on a single country (e.g. Croatia, Romania, Turkey, Cyprus, Albania, Serbia, Bulgaria, Greece, Macedonia), they are in dialogue with each other and share an opposition to rigid isolationist identities. Illuminating and challenging, Balkan Identities demonstrates the ever-changing nature of a troubled and culturally vibrant region.

    • Philosophy

Opus Dei

An Archaeology of Duty
Author: Giorgio Agamben
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804788561
Category: Philosophy
Page: 164
View: 1471
In this follow-up to The Kingdom and the Glory and The Highest Poverty, Agamben investigates the roots of our moral concept of duty in the theory and practice of Christian liturgy. Beginning with the New Testament and working through to late scholasticism and modern papal encyclicals, Agamben traces the Church's attempts to repeat Christ's unrepeatable sacrifice. Crucial here is the paradoxical figure of the priest, who becomes more and more a pure instrument of God's power, so that his own motives and character are entirely indifferent as long as he carries out his priestly duties. In modernity, Agamben argues, the Christian priest has become the model ethical subject. We see this above all in Kantian ethics. Contrasting the Christian and modern ontology of duty with the classical ontology of being, Agamben contends that Western philosophy has unfolded in the tension between the two. This latest installment in the study of Western political structures begun in Homo Sacer is a contribution to the study of liturgy, an extension of Nietzsche's genealogy of morals, and a reworking of Heidegger's history of Being.

    • History

Greek and Roman Technology: A Sourcebook

Annotated Translations of Greek and Latin Texts and Documents
Author: Andrew N. Sherwood,Milo Nikolic,John W. Humphrey,John P. Oleson,Assistant Professor Department of Classics Milo Nikolic
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134926219
Category: History
Page: 648
View: 432
In this volume the authors translate and annotate key passages from ancient authors to provide a history and an analysis of the origins and development of technology. Among the topics covered are: * energy * basic mechanical devices * agriculture * food processing and diet * mining and metallurgy * construction and hydraulic engineering * household industry * transport and trade * military technology. The sourcebook presents 150 ancient authors and a diverse range of literary genres, such as, the encyclopedic Natural Histories of Pliny the Elder, the poetry of Homer and Hesiod, the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle and Lucretius and the agricultural treatise of Varro. Humphrey, Oleson and Sherwood provide a comprehensive and accessible collection of rich and varied sources to illustrate and elucidate the beginnings of technology. Glossaries of technological terminology, indices of authors and subjects, introductions outlining the general significance of the evidence, notes to explain the specific details, and a recent bibliography make this volume a valuable research and teaching tool.

    • Bible - O.T - Hebrew - Criticism, Textual

Hebrew Is Greek


Author: Joseph Yahuda
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Bible - O.T - Hebrew - Criticism, Textual
Page: 686
View: 4063

    • Biography & Autobiography

How to Live

Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer
Author: Sarah Bakewell
Publisher: Other Press, LLC
ISBN: 1590514262
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 400
View: 6567
Winner of the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography How to get along with people, how to deal with violence, how to adjust to losing someone you love—such questions arise in most people’s lives. They are all versions of a bigger question: how do you live? How do you do the good or honorable thing, while flourishing and feeling happy? This question obsessed Renaissance writers, none more than Michel Eyquem de Monatigne, perhaps the first truly modern individual. A nobleman, public official and wine-grower, he wrote free-roaming explorations of his thought and experience, unlike anything written before. He called them “essays,” meaning “attempts” or “tries.” Into them, he put whatever was in his head: his tastes in wine and food, his childhood memories, the way his dog’s ears twitched when it was dreaming, as well as the appalling events of the religious civil wars raging around him. The Essays was an instant bestseller and, over four hundred years later, Montaigne’s honesty and charm still draw people to him. Readers come in search of companionship, wisdom and entertainment—and in search of themselves. This book, a spirited and singular biography, relates the story of his life by way of the questions he posed and the answers he explored. It traces his bizarre upbringing, youthful career and sexual adventures, his travels, and his friendships with the scholar and poet Étienne de La Boétie and with his adopted “daughter,” Marie de Gournay. And we also meet his readers—who for centuries have found in Montaigne an inexhaustible source of answers to the haunting question, “how to live?”

    • History

Democracy

A Life
Author: Paul Cartledge
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190494328
Category: History
Page: 383
View: 2506
Ancient Greece first coined the concept of "democracy," yet almost every major ancient Greek thinker-from Plato and Aristotle onwards- was ambivalent towards or even hostile to democracy in any form. The explanation for this is quite simple: the elite perceived majority power as tantamount to a dictatorship of the proletariat. In ancient Greece there can be traced not only the rudiments of modern democratic society but the entire Western tradition of anti-democratic thought. In Democracy, Paul Cartledge provides a detailed history of this ancient political system. In addition, by drawing out the salient differences between ancient and modern forms of democracy he enables a richer understanding of both. Cartledge contends that there is no one "ancient Greek democracy" as pure and simple as is often believed. Democracy surveys the emergence and development of Greek politics, the invention of political theory, and-intimately connected to the latter- the birth of democracy, first at Athens in c. 500 bce and then at its greatest flourishing in the Greek world 150 years later. Cartledge then traces the decline of genuinely democratic Greek institutions at the hands of the Macedonians and-subsequently and decisively-the Romans. Throughout, he sheds light on the variety of democratic practices in the classical world as well as on their similarities to and dissimilarities from modern democratic forms, from the American and French revolutions to contemporary political thought. Authoritative and accessible, Cartledge's book will be regarded as the best account of ancient democracy and its long afterlife for many years to come.

    • History

Why the West Rules - For Now

The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future
Author: Ian Morris
Publisher: McClelland & Stewart
ISBN: 1551995816
Category: History
Page: 768
View: 6655
Why does the West rule? In this magnum opus, eminent Stanford polymath Ian Morris answers this provocative question, drawing on 50,000 years of history, archeology, and the methods of social science, to make sense of when, how, and why the paths of development differed in the East and West — and what this portends for the 21st century. There are two broad schools of thought on why the West rules. Proponents of "Long-Term Lock-In" theories such as Jared Diamond suggest that from time immemorial, some critical factor — geography, climate, or culture perhaps — made East and West unalterably different, and determined that the industrial revolution would happen in the West and push it further ahead of the East. But the East led the West between 500 and 1600, so this development can't have been inevitable; and so proponents of "Short-Term Accident" theories argue that Western rule was a temporary aberration that is now coming to an end, with Japan, China, and India resuming their rightful places on the world stage. However, as the West led for 9,000 of the previous 10,000 years, it wasn't just a temporary aberration. So, if we want to know why the West rules, we need a whole new theory. Ian Morris, boldly entering the turf of Jared Diamond and Niall Ferguson, provides the broader approach that is necessary, combining the textual historian's focus on context, the anthropological archaeologist's awareness of the deep past, and the social scientist's comparative methods to make sense of the past, present, and future — in a way no one has ever done before. From the Hardcover edition.

    • Philosophy

Heraclitus Seminar


Author: Martin Heidegger,Eugen Fink
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 9780810110670
Category: Philosophy
Page: 169
View: 8115
In 1966-67 Martin Heidegger and Eugen Fink conducted an extraordinary seminar on the fragments of Heraclitus. Heraclitus Seminar records those conversations, documenting the imaginative and experimental character of the multiplicity of interpretations offered and providing an invaluable portrait of Heidegger involved in active discussion and explication. Heidegger's remarks in this seminar illuminate his interpretations not only of pre-Socratic philosophy, but also of figures such as Hegel and Holderllin. At the same time, Heidegger clarifies many late developments in his own understanding of truth, Being, and understanding. Heidegger and Fink, both deeply rooted in the Freiburg phenomenological tradition, offer two competing approaches to the phenomenological reading of the ancient text-a kind of reading that, as Fink says, is "not so much concerned with the philological problematic ... as with advancing into the matter itself, that is, toward the matter that must have stood before Heraclitus's spiritual view."

    • Bible

The Face of Water

A Translator on Beauty and Meaning in the Bible
Author: Sarah Ruden
Publisher: Pantheon
ISBN: 0307908569
Category: Bible
Page: 232
View: 1504
A dazzling reconsideration of the language and translation of the Bible, both Old and New Testaments, from the acclaimed scholar and translator of classical literature (oThe best translation of The Aeneid,certainly the best of our timeo-Ursula Le Guin; oThe first translation since Dryden that can be read as a great English poem in itselfo-Garry Wills, The New York Review of Books), and author of Paul Among the People(oAstonishing . . . superbo-starred Booklist). a The King James Bible is considered the definitive and most accurate English translation of the Bible. But while its comparatively easy to read language allowed it to become accessible to millions of people who were barred by a lack of knowledge of the more esoteric Greek, Latin, and Hebrew versions, much gets lost in translation-particularly in tone and lyricism. Even the most commonly accepted Ancient Greek and Latin translations fail to maintain all of the intricacies of the original Hebrew text. a In The Face of Water,Sarah Ruden brilliantly, elegantly celebrates and translates the Bible's original languages and looks at how passages have been misunderstood over the centuries, at how the most commonly accepted English translations have been lacking in the intent of the original text. Ruden reveals both the poetry and lyricism-earthy, mysterious, infused with wit-that has made the Bible the compelling piece of literature it has been for more than a millennium. a Cross-referencing the popular King James interpretation of the Bible with Ruden's own direct translation of the ancient Hebrew, the author demonstrates with deftness and agility, the musicality of some of the most popular passages-the Lord's Prayer, Ezekiel's Dry Bones, and more.

    • Religion

Luke and Vergil

Imitations of Classical Greek Literature
Author: Dennis R. MacDonald
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 144223055X
Category: Religion
Page: 272
View: 6736
These two volumes are the magnum opus of biblical scholar Dennis R. MacDonald, outlining the profound connections between the New Testament and classical Greek poetry. MacDonald argues that the Gospel writers borrowed from established literary sources to create stories about Jesus that readers of the day would find convincing.

    • Art

Venice & Antiquity

The Venetian Sense of the Past
Author: Patricia Fortini Brown
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300067003
Category: Art
Page: 361
View: 5784
Drawing on such remains of vernacular culture as inscriptions, medals, travellers accounts, and antique writings, as well as the art of the period, this text focuses on Venice's Golden Age and shows how it was influenced by antiquity, by its Byzantine heritage and by its own historical experience.

    • Political Science

A Passion for Justice

Emotions and the Origins of the Social Contract
Author: Robert C. Solomon
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780847680870
Category: Political Science
Page: 328
View: 1361
This text argues that justice is a virtue which everyone shares - a function of personal character and not just of government or economic planning. It uses examples from Plato to Ivan Boesky, to document how we live and how we feel.

    • Business & Economics

Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean


Author: Irad Malkin,Christy Constantakopoulou,Katerina Panagopoulou
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317991141
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 322
View: 9757
How useful is the concept of "network" for historical studies and the ancient world in particular? Using theoretical models of social network analysis, this book illuminates aspects of the economic, social, religious, and political history of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Bringing together some of the most active and prominent researchers in ancient history, this book moves beyond political institutions, ethnic, and geographical boundaries in order to observe the ancient Mediterranean through a perspective of network interaction. It employs a wide range of approaches, and to examine relationships and interactions among various social entities in the Mediterranean. Chronologically, the book extends from the early Iron Age to the late Antique world, covering the Mediterranean between Antioch in the east to Massalia (Marseilles) in the west. This book was published as two special issues in Mediterranean Historical Review.

    • Fiction

Atlas Shrugged


Author: Ayn Rand
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101137193
Category: Fiction
Page: 1088
View: 793
Peopled by larger-than-life heroes and villains, charged with towering questions of good and evil, Atlas Shrugged is Ayn Rand’s magnum opus: a philosophical revolution told in the form of an action thriller. Who is John Galt? When he says that he will stop the motor of the world, is he a destroyer or a liberator? Why does he have to fight his battles not against his enemies but against those who need him most? Why does he fight his hardest battle against the woman he loves? You will know the answer to these questions when you discover the reason behind the baffling events that play havoc with the lives of the amazing men and women in this book. You will discover why a productive genius becomes a worthless playboy...why a great steel industrialist is working for his own destruction...why a composer gives up his career on the night of his triumph...why a beautiful woman who runs a transcontinental railroad falls in love with the man she has sworn to kill. Atlas Shrugged, a modern classic and Rand’s most extensive statement of Objectivism—her groundbreaking philosophy—offers the reader the spectacle of human greatness, depicted with all the poetry and power of one of the twentieth century’s leading artists.

    • History

The Greek Historians


Author: T. James Luce
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134845359
Category: History
Page: 168
View: 4827
The Greeks invented history as a literary genre in the fifth century B.C. The first historians owed much to Homer and adopted his vivid and direct style in narrating historical events. Yet, despite the influence of Homer the birth of history was basically a reaction against mythical accounts of the past. Homer wrote about war and travel in foreign lands, in the distant and mythical past. In contrast, the Greek historians of the fifth century wrote about contemporary or very recent events, where eye witnesses could be interviewed and facts checked. The Greek Historians follows the development of history from Herodotus, via Thucydides, Xenophon and Polybius, until the Hellenistic age. It introduces the individual writers and their topics, yet it also outlines their attitudes to historiography and their criticisms of each other. Such themes as the uses and value of truth and causation are traced, as well as the growing constraints on free speech under Hellenistic monarchs and the Romans. Written in an accessible and captivating manner, with suggestions for further reading, this book serves as a lucid introduction to Greek historians and writing of history.