• Biography & Autobiography

The Home Place

Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature
Author: J. Drew Lanham
Publisher: Milkweed Editions
ISBN: 1571318755
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 232
View: 4790
“In me, there is the red of miry clay, the brown of spring floods, the gold of ripening tobacco. All of these hues are me; I am, in the deepest sense, colored.” From these fertile soils of love, land, identity, family, and race emerges The Home Place, a big-hearted, unforgettable memoir by ornithologist and professor of ecology J. Drew Lanham. Dating back to slavery, Edgefield County, South Carolina—a place “easy to pass by on the way somewhere else”—has been home to generations of Lanhams. In The Home Place, readers meet these extraordinary people, including Drew himself, who over the course of the 1970s falls in love with the natural world around him. As his passion takes flight, however, he begins to ask what it means to be “the rare bird, the oddity.” By turns angry, funny, elegiac, and heartbreaking, The Home Place is a remarkable meditation on nature and belonging, at once a deeply moving memoir and riveting exploration of the contradictions of black identity in the rural South—and in America today.

    • Biography & Autobiography

The Home Place

Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature
Author: J. Drew Lanham
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781571313508
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 232
View: 2877
"A groundbreaking work about race and the American landscape. Thoughtful, sincere, wise, and beautiful."--Helen Macdonald

    • BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

The Home Place

Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature
Author: J. Drew Lanham
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781571313157
Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
Page: 216
View: 5591
"In me, there is the red of miry clay, the brown of spring floods, the gold of ripening tobacco. All of these hues are me; I am, in the deepest sense, colored." From these fertile soils of love, land, identity, family, and race emergesThe Home Place, a big-hearted, unforgettable memoir by ornithologist and professor of ecology J. Drew Lanham. Dating back to slavery, Edgefield County, South Carolina--a place "easy to pass by on the way somewhere else"--has been home to generations of Lanhams. InThe Home Place, readers meet these extraordinary people, including Drew himself, who over the course of the 1970s falls in love with the natural world around him. As his passion takes flight, however, he begins to ask what it means to be "the rare bird, the oddity." By turns angry, funny, elegiac, and heartbreaking,The Home Place is a remarkable meditation on nature and belonging, at once a deeply moving memoir and riveting exploration of the contradictions of black identity in the rural South--and in America today.

    • Fiction

The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man


Author: James Johnson
Publisher: Jovian Press
ISBN: 1537823507
Category: Fiction
Page: 206
View: 7090
The first fictional memoir ever written by a black person, The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man influenced a generation of writers during the Harlem Renaissance and served as eloquent inspiration for Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and Richard Wright. In the 1920s and since, it has also given white readers a startling new perspective on their own culture, revealing to many the double standard of racial identity imposed on black Americans...

    • History

Dwellings

A Spiritual History of the Living World
Author: Linda Hogan
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684830337
Category: History
Page: 160
View: 2814
Written in the form of stories and suffused with a reverence for the earth, a collection of meditations explores the mysteries of such subjects as bees, porcupines, caves, and the myths and rituals of Native American cultures. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.

    • Poetry

Black Nature

Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry
Author: Camille T. Dungy
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820332771
Category: Poetry
Page: 387
View: 7008
Black Nature is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated. Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry--anything but nature poetry. This is particularly true when the definition of what constitutes nature writing is limited to work about the pastoral or the wild. Camille T. Dungy has selected 180 poems from 93 poets that provide unique perspectives on American social and literary history to broaden our concept of nature poetry and African American poetics. This collection features major writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Wanda Coleman, Natasha Trethewey, and Melvin B. Tolson as well as newer talents such as Douglas Kearney, Major Jackson, and Janice Harrington. Included are poets writing out of slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century African American poetic movements. Black Nature brings to the fore a neglected and vital means of considering poetry by African Americans and nature-related poetry as a whole. A Friends Fund Publication.

    • History

Rooted in the Earth

Reclaiming the African American Environmental Heritage
Author: Dianne D. Glave
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 156976753X
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 4520
With a basis in environmental history, this groundbreaking study challenges the idea that a meaningful attachment to nature and the outdoors is contrary to the black experience. The discussion shows that contemporary African American culture is usually seen as an urban culture, one that arose out of the Great Migration and has contributed to international trends in fashion, music, and the arts ever since. But because of this urban focus, many African Americans are not at peace with their rich but tangled agrarian legacy. On one hand, the book shows, nature and violence are connected in black memory, especially in disturbing images such as slave ships on the ocean, exhaustion in the fields, dogs in the woods, and dead bodies hanging from trees. In contrast, though, there is also a competing tradition of African American stewardship of the land that should be better known. Emphasizing the tradition of black environmentalism and using storytelling techniques to dramatize the work of black naturalists, this account corrects the record and urges interested urban dwellers to get back to the land.

    • Biography & Autobiography

A Place to Stand


Author: Jimmy Santiago Baca
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 9781555848903
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 272
View: 1290
A vivid portrait of life inside a maximum-security prison and an affirmation of one man’s spirit in overcoming the most brutal adversity. Jimmy Santiago Baca’s harrowing, brilliant memoir of his life before, during, and immediately after the years he spent in a maximum-security prison garnered tremendous critical acclaim and went on to win the prestigious 2001 International Prize. Long considered one of the best poets in America today, Baca was illiterate at the age of twenty-one and facing five to ten years behind bars for selling drugs. This raw, unflinching memoir is the remarkable tale of how he emerged after his years in the penitentiary—much of it spent in isolation—with the ability to read and a passion for writing poetry. “Proof there is always hope in even the most desperate lives.” —Fort Worth Star-Telegram “A hell of a book, quite literally. You won’t soon forget it.” —The San Diego Union-Tribune “This book will have a permanent place in American letters.” —Jim Harrison, New York Times–bestselling author of A Good Day to Die

    • Nature

Black Faces, White Spaces

Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors
Author: Carolyn Finney
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469614480
Category: Nature
Page: 194
View: 9570
Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

    • Biography & Autobiography

Dreams from My Father

A Story of Race and Inheritance
Author: Barack Obama
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 9780307394125
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 464
View: 2973
In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey—first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance. Pictured in lefthand photograph on cover: Habiba Akumu Hussein and Barack Obama, Sr. (President Obama's paternal grandmother and his father as a young boy). Pictured in righthand photograph on cover: Stanley Dunham and Ann Dunham (President Obama's maternal grandfather and his mother as a young girl). From the Trade Paperback edition.

    • Art

In the Aura of a Hole

Exploring Sites of Material Extraction
Author: A. Laurie Palmer
Publisher: Black Dog Pub Limited
ISBN: 9781908966582
Category: Art
Page: 128
View: 4617
In The Aura of a Hole explores the work of A. Laurie Palmer an artist, writer, and teacher. Her work is concerned, most immediately, with resistance to privatization, and more generally, with theoretical and material explorations of matter's active nature as it asserts itself on different scales and in different speeds. Her work takes various forms as sculpture, installation, public projects, and writing. This publication focuses specifically on a decade long project Palmer undertook as an extended exploration of mineral extraction sites in the U.S, which through her narration of a first person perspective, discusses themes of the raw scientific and mechanical aspects of the industry, but furthermore those that she found a collective survey brought up, themes of environmental justice, First Nation rights, industrial agriculture, chemical weapons, low temperature physics, the Cold War, the Iraq War, biotechnology, bio-geochronology, nanotechnology, Homeland Security, globalised trade, global warming and unemployment. Palmer has shown her work, both independently and with the four-person art collective Haha, at national and international venues since 1988, and published writing since 1986. Palmer teaches in the Sculpture Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her works are in the collections of institutions such as the City of Linz, Austria, the Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago and the University Galleries, Illinois State University.

    • Biography & Autobiography

The Light of the World

A Memoir
Author: Elizabeth Alexander
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
ISBN: 1455599859
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 224
View: 8184
"PULITZER PRIZE IN LETTERS: BIOGRAPHY FINALIST""NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRLE AWARDS AUTOBIOGRAPHY FINALIST" New York Times BestsellerFirst Lady Michelle Obama's Favorite Book of 2015A New Yorker, NPR, Boston Globe, Publisher's Weekly, Newsday, Library Journal, People.com, Shelf Awareness, The Root, and St. Louis Dispact Best Book of 2015 PickNew York Times Book Review Editor's ChoiceAn Amazon's Best Book of the Month, April 2015IndieBound Indie Next #1 Pick, May 2015 A deeply resonant memoir for anyone who has loved and lost, from acclaimed poet and Pulitzer Prize finalist Elizabeth Alexander. In THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD, Elizabeth Alexander finds herself at an existential crossroads after the sudden death of her husband. Channeling her poetic sensibilities into a rich, lucid price, Alexander tells a love story that is, itself, a story of loss. As she reflects on the beauty of her married life, the trauma resulting from her husband's death, and the solace found in caring for her two teenage sons, Alexander universalizes a very personal quest for meaning and acceptance in the wake of loss. THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD is at once an endlessly compelling memoir and a deeply felt meditation on the blessings of love, family, art, and community. It is also a lyrical celebration of a life well-lived and a paean to the priceless gift of human companionship. For those who have loved and lost, or for anyone who cares what matters most, THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD is required reading.

    • Fiction

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave


Author: Frederick Douglass
Publisher: Big Nest via PublishDrive
ISBN: 1910833819
Category: Fiction
Page: 106
View: 1679
One of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the early 19th century in the United States, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is a memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass. In factual detail, the text describes the events of his life.

    • Sports & Recreation

The Adventure Gap

Changing the Face of the Outdoors
Author: James Edward Mills
Publisher: Mountaineers Books
ISBN: 1594858691
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 256
View: 3826
• Chronicles the first all-African American summit attempt on Denali, the highest point in North America • Part adventure story, part history, and part argument for the importance of inspiring future generations to value nature The nation’s wild places—from national and state parks to national forests, preserves, and wilderness areas—belong to all Americans. But not all of us use these resources equally. Minority populations are much less likely to seek recreation, adventure, and solace in our wilderness spaces. It’s a difference that African American author James Mills addresses in his new book, The Adventure Gap: Changing the Face of the Outdoors. Bridging the so-called “adventure gap” requires role models who can inspire the uninitiated to experience and enjoy wild places. Once new visitors are there, a love affair often follows. This is important because as our country grows increasingly multicultural, our natural legacy will need the devotion of people of all races and ethnicities to steward its care. In 2013, the first all-African American team of climbers, sponsored by the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), challenged themselves on North America’s highest point, the dangerous and forbidding Denali, in Alaska. Mills uses Expedition Denali and its team members’ adventures as a jumping-off point to explore how minority populations view their place in wild environments and to share the stories of those who have already achieved significant accomplishments in outdoor adventures—from Mathew Henson, a Black explorer who stood with Peary at the North Pole, to Kai Lightner, a teenage sport climber currently winning national competitions. The goal of the expedition, and now the book, is to inspire minority communities to look outdoors for experiences that will enrich their lives, and to encourage them toward greater environmental stewardship.

    • Fiction

Memoirs of a Geisha

A Novel
Author: Arthur Golden
Publisher: Vintage Contemporaries
ISBN: 0307275167
Category: Fiction
Page: 434
View: 9039
The "memoirs" of one of Japan's most celebrated geishas describes how, in 1929, as a little girl, she is sold into slavery, her efforts to learn the arts of the geisha, the impact of World War II, and her struggle to reinvent herself to win the man she loves. Reissue. (A Columbia Pictures film, directed by Rob Marshall, releasing Winter 2005, starring Ziyi Zhang, Ken Watanabe, Michelle Yeoh, Koji Yakusho, & Gong Li) (Historical Fiction)

    • Fiction

Mark Z. Danielewski's House of Leaves


Author: Mark Z. Danielewski,Zampan?o
Publisher: Pantheon
ISBN: 0375420525
Category: Fiction
Page: 709
View: 9057
A family relocates to a small house on Ash Tree Lane and discovers that the inside of their new home seems to be without boundaries

    • Fiction

Love in the Time of Cholera


Author: Gabriel García Márquez
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1101911115
Category: Fiction
Page: 368
View: 1289
AVAILABLE FOR THE FIRST TIME IN eBOOK! In their youth, Florentino Ariza and Fermina Daza fall passionately in love. When Fermina eventually chooses to marry a wealthy, well-born doctor, Florentino is devastated, but he is a romantic. As he rises in his business career he whiles away the years in 622 affairs--yet he reserves his heart for Fermina. Her husband dies at last, and Florentino purposefully attends the funeral. Fifty years, nine months, and four days after he first declared his love for Fermina, he will do so again.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Born a Crime

Stories from a South African Childhood
Author: Trevor Noah
Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
ISBN: 0399588183
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 8106
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The compelling, inspiring, and comically sublime story of one man’s coming-of-age, set during the twilight of apartheid and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Michiko Kakutani, New York Times • Newsday • Esquire • NPR • Booklist Trevor Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s tyrannical white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle. Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man’s relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother—his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life. The stories collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother’s unconventional, unconditional love. Praise for Born a Crime “[A] compelling new memoir . . . By turns alarming, sad and funny, [Trevor Noah’s] book provides a harrowing look, through the prism of Mr. Noah’s family, at life in South Africa under apartheid. . . . Born a Crime is not just an unnerving account of growing up in South Africa under apartheid, but a love letter to the author’s remarkable mother.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times “[An] unforgettable memoir.”—Parade “What makes Born a Crime such a soul-nourishing pleasure, even with all its darker edges and perilous turns, is reading Noah recount in brisk, warmly conversational prose how he learned to negotiate his way through the bullying and ostracism. . . . What also helped was having a mother like Patricia Nombuyiselo Noah. . . . Consider Born a Crime another such gift to her—and an enormous gift to the rest of us.”—USA Today “[Noah] thrives with the help of his astonishingly fearless mother. . . . Their fierce bond makes this story soar.”—People “[Noah’s] electrifying memoir sparkles with funny stories . . . and his candid and compassionate essays deepen our perception of the complexities of race, gender, and class.”—Booklist (starred review) “A gritty memoir . . . studded with insight and provocative social criticism . . . with flashes of brilliant storytelling and acute observations.”—Kirkus Reviews

    • Social Science

Hillbilly Elegy

A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
Author: J. D. Vance
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062872257
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 1422
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, NAMED BY THE TIMES AS ONE OF "6 BOOKS TO HELP UNDERSTAND TRUMP'S WIN" AND SOON TO BE A MAJOR-MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD "You will not read a more important book about America this year."—The Economist "A riveting book."—The Wall Street Journal "Essential reading."—David Brooks, New York Times Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for more than forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually one of their grandchildren would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that J.D.'s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, never fully escaping the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. With piercing honesty, Vance shows how he himself still carries around the demons of his chaotic family history. A deeply moving memoir, with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

    • Fiction

The Handmaid's Tale


Author: Margaret Atwood
Publisher: Emblem Editions
ISBN: 1551994968
Category: Fiction
Page: 368
View: 7237
In this multi-award-winning, bestselling novel, Margaret Atwood has created a stunning Orwellian vision of the near future. This is the story of Offred, one of the unfortunate “Handmaids” under the new social order who have only one purpose: to breed. In Gilead, where women are prohibited from holding jobs, reading, and forming friendships, Offred’s persistent memories of life in the “time before” and her will to survive are acts of rebellion. Provocative, startling, prophetic, and with Margaret Atwood’s devastating irony, wit, and acute perceptive powers in full force, The Handmaid’s Tale is at once a mordant satire and a dire warning.