• History

The Impending Crisis

America Before the Civil War, 1848-1861
Author: David M. Potter
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061319297
Category: History
Page: 672
View: 1587
David M. Potter's Pulitzer Prize-winning The Impending Crisis is the definitive history of antebellum America. Potter's sweeping epic masterfully charts the chaotic forces that climaxed with the outbreak of the Civil War: westward expansion, the divisive issue of slavery, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's uprising, the ascension of Abraham Lincoln, and the drama of Southern succession. Now available in a new edition, The Impending Crisis remains one of the most celebrated works of American historical writing.

    • History

The impending crisis, 1848-1861


Author: David M. Potter
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 638
View: 6041
Examines the problems of slavery, expansion, and sectionalism between 1848 and 1861.

    • History

A Wicked War

Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico
Author: Amy S. Greenberg
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307475999
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 2996
Originally published by Alfred A. Knopf in 2012.

    • United States History Civil War, 1861-1865

The Battle Cry of Freedom

The Civil War Era
Author: James M. McPherson
Publisher: Singapore Books
ISBN: N.A
Category: United States History Civil War, 1861-1865
Page: 357
View: 3166
"Now featuring a new Afterword by the author, this handy paperback edition of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Battle Cry of Freedom is without question the definitive one-volume history of the Civil War. James McPherson's fast-paced narrative fully integrates the political, social, and military events that crowded the two decades from the outbreak of one war in Mexico to the ending of another at Appomattox. Packed with drama and analytical insight, the book vividly recounts the momentous episodes that preceded the Civil War including the Dred Scott decision, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry. From there it moves into a masterful chronicle of the war itself--the battles, the strategic maneuvering by each side, the politics, and the personalities. Particularly notable are McPherson's new views on such matters as the slavery expansion issue in the 1850s...

    • Political Science

Democracies at War


Author: Dan Reiter,Allan C. Stam
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400824458
Category: Political Science
Page: 304
View: 7976
Why do democracies win wars? This is a critical question in the study of international relations, as a traditional view--expressed most famously by Alexis de Tocqueville--has been that democracies are inferior in crafting foreign policy and fighting wars. In Democracies at War, the first major study of its kind, Dan Reiter and Allan Stam come to a very different conclusion. Democracies tend to win the wars they fight--specifically, about eighty percent of the time. Complementing their wide-ranging case-study analysis, the authors apply innovative statistical tests and new hypotheses. In unusually clear prose, they pinpoint two reasons for democracies' success at war. First, as elected leaders understand that losing a war can spell domestic political backlash, democracies start only those wars they are likely to win. Secondly, the emphasis on individuality within democratic societies means that their soldiers fight with greater initiative and superior leadership. Surprisingly, Reiter and Stam find that it is neither economic muscle nor bandwagoning between democratic powers that enables democracies to win wars. They also show that, given societal consent, democracies are willing to initiate wars of empire or genocide. On the whole, they find, democracies' dependence on public consent makes for more, rather than less, effective foreign policy. Taking a fresh approach to a question that has long merited such a study, this book yields crucial insights on security policy, the causes of war, and the interplay between domestic politics and international relations.

    • Social Science

The Negro in the United States

A Selected Bibliography
Author: Dorothy Porter Wesley,Dorothy Burnett Porter
Publisher: Omnigraphics Incorporated
ISBN: 9780780803121
Category: Social Science
Page: 313
View: 7568
Identifies some 1,700 works about African Americans. Entries include full bibliographic information as well as Library of Congress call numbers and location in 11 major university libraries. Entries are arranged by subjects such as art, civil rights, folk tales, history, legal status, medicine, music, race relations, and regional studies. First published in 1970 by the Library of Congress.

    • History

Empire of Wealth

The Epic History of American Economic Power
Author: John Steele Gordon
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780060505127
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 4089
Throughout time, from ancient Rome to modern Britain, the great empires built and maintained their domination through force of arms and political power. But not the United States. America has dominated the world in a new, peaceful, and pervasive way -- through the continued creation of staggering wealth. In this authoritative, engrossing history, John Steele Gordon captures as never before the true source of our nation's global influence: wealth and the capacity to create more of it. This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.

    • Social Science

Anarchy and Society

Reflections on Anarchist Sociology
Author: Jeffrey Shantz,Dana M. Williams
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004252991
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 6259
Anarchy and Society constructs a tentative synthesis of sociological and anarchist thought, providing a roadmap to a future ‘anarchist sociology’.

    • Psychology

The Psychology of Politics


Author: William F. Stone,Paul E. Schaffner
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461238307
Category: Psychology
Page: 331
View: 7004
The Psychology of Politics is an introduction to political psychology. The field has a long past, but as an organized discipline, it has a short history. The long past is detailed in Jaap van Ginneken's historical first chapter of the book. The short history of political psychology as an organized disci pline dates from 1978, when the International Society of Political Psychol ogy (ISPP) was founded (Stone, 1981, 1988). The formal establishment of an interdiscipline drawing upon various social sciences had numerous predecessors in the 20th century: Wallas's (1908) Human Nature in Politics, Harold Lasswell's Psychopathology and Politics in 1930, a book with the present title by Eysenck (1954), and The Handbook of Political Psychology, edited by the founder of the ISPP, Jeanne Knutson. Her Handbook defined the field at the time of its publication in 1973 (see espe cially Davies' chapter). The present revision of Stone's (1974) work is more modest in its aspira tions. It provides a selective introduction to the field, emphasizing topics that the authors believe to be representative and important. Many psycho logically relevant topics, such as political socialization, participation, voting behavior, and leadership, are not represented among our chapter titles.

    • Art

Nature and Culture : American Landscape and Painting, 1825-1875, With a New Preface

American Landscape and Painting, 1825-1875, With a New Preface
Author: Barbara Novak Altschul Professor of Art History Barnard College and Columbia University (Emerita)
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195345665
Category: Art
Page: 352
View: 2806
In this richly illustrated volume, featuring more than fifty black-and-white illustrations and a beautiful eight-page color insert, Barbara Novak describes how for fifty extraordinary years, American society drew from the idea of Nature its most cherished ideals. Between 1825 and 1875, all kinds of Americans--artists, writers, scientists, as well as everyday citizens--believed that God in Nature could resolve human contradictions, and that nature itself confirmed the American destiny. Using diaries and letters of the artists as well as quotes from literary texts, journals, and periodicals, Novak illuminates the range of ideas projected onto the American landscape by painters such as Thomas Cole, Albert Bierstadt, Frederic Edwin Church, Asher B. Durand, Fitz H. Lane, and Martin J. Heade, and writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Frederich Wilhelm von Schelling. Now with a new preface, this spectacular volume captures a vast cultural panorama. It beautifully demonstrates how the idea of nature served, not only as a vehicle for artistic creation, but as its ideal form. "An impressive achievement." --Barbara Rose, The New York Times Book Review "An admirable blend of ambition, elan, and hard research. Not just an art book, it bears on some of the deepest fantasies of American culture as a whole." --Robert Hughes, Time Magazine

    • History

The American Civil War


Author: Adam I. P. Smith
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 0230213529
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 675
The American Civil War was by far the bloodiest conflict in American history. Arising out of a political crisis over the expansion of slavery, the war set the stage for the emergence of the modern American nation-state. This new interpretation of one of the most mythologized events in modern history combines narrative with analysis and an up-to-date assessment of the state of Civil War scholarship. The American Civil War: - emphasizes the importance of Northern public opinion in shaping the meaning and outcome of the crisis - argues that the war exposed deep social and political divisions within, as well as between, North and South - explores the experiences of ordinary soldiers and civilians, and the political and cultural context in which they lived - sets this distinctively American crisis over slavery and nationhood in the wider context of the nineteenth-century world. Concise and authoritative, this is an indispensable introduction to a critical period in modern American history.

    • History

Austrian Imperial Censorship and the Bohemian Periodical Press from the Revolutions of 1848 to the Tábory, 1867-71

The Baneful Work of the Opposition Press is Fearsome
Author: Jeffrey T. Leigh
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319558803
Category: History
Page: 339
View: 857
This book analyzes the conduct of press policy in Bohemia from the Revolutions of 1848 through the period of the Tábory, 1867-71. In the aftermath of the revolutions, the Habsburg state, far from constituting an historical relic, proved itself boldly innovative, inaugurating liberal reforms, most importantly the rule of law. While the reforms helped it to survive its immediate challenges, they nonetheless, quite paradoxically, created an environment in which the periodical press continued to advance perspectives emblematic of the revolution, even during the era of Neoabsolutism. This new legal environment fostered the rise of the bourgeois public sphere, as theorized by Jürgen Habermas, and the very political movements that would contribute to its demise, as signaled in the Tábory campaign of 1867-71. At the nexus of civil society and the state stood the provincial Habsburg officials responsible for public order and security. Their experience was one of endeavoring to balance the ideals of the rule of law imposed by the Imperial center and their own vital concerns regarding the survival of the Monarchy. This work, for the first time, concentrates on the role of these officials who determined what would—and would not—appear in print.

    • Philosophy

The Wager of Lucien Goldmann

Tragedy, Dialectics, and a Hidden God
Author: Mitchell Cohen
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400821266
Category: Philosophy
Page: 366
View: 9772
In The Wager of Lucien Goldmann, Mitchell Cohen provides the first full-length study of this major figure of postwar French intellectual life and champion of socialist humanism. While many Parisian leftists staunchly upheld Marxism's "scientificity" in the 1950s and 1960s, Lucien Goldmann insisted that Marxism was by then in severe crisis and had to reinvent itself radically if it were to survive. He rejected the traditional Marxist view of the proletariat and contested the structuralist and antihumanist theorizing that infected French left-wing circles in the tumultuous 1960s. Highly regarded by thinkers as diverse as Jean Piaget and Alasdair MacIntyre, Goldmann is shown here as a socialist who, unlike many others of his time, refused to portray his aspirations for humanity’s future as an inexorable unfolding of history’s laws. He saw these aspirations instead as a wager akin to Pascal’s in the existence of God. “Risk,” Goldmann wrote in his classic study of Pascal and Racine, The Hidden God, “possibility of failure, hope of success, and the synthesis of the three in a faith which is a wager are the essential constituent elements of the human condition.” In The Wager of Lucien Goldmann, Cohen retrieves Goldmann’s achievement—his “genetic structuralist” method, his sociology of literature, his libertarian socialist politics. Originally published in 1994. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Castle Valley, America

hard land, hard-won home
Author: Nancy Jacobus Taniguchi
Publisher: Utah State Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 365
View: 6884
In Castle Valley, coal mining and the railroad attracted diverse, multiethnic communities and a fair share of historic characters, from Butch Cassidy to Mother Jones. Taniguchi has written an epic history that is not just local history but American history writ locally.

    • History

Antislavery Politics in Antebellum and Civil War America


Author: Thomas G. Mitchell
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275991685
Category: History
Page: 289
View: 1858
Abolitionism as a political and social reform movement resulted in massive structural changes in American politics and economics.

    • Communities

Encyclopedia of Community

From the Village to the Virtual World
Author: DAVID LEVINSON,KAREN CHRISTENSEN
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 0761925988
Category: Communities
Page: 1839
View: 6781

    • Science

History of Cartography

International Symposium of the ICA Commission, 2010
Author: Elri Liebenberg,Imre Josef Demhardt
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642190871
Category: Science
Page: 306
View: 9405
This volume comprises the proceedings of the 2010 International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography. The nineteen papers reflect the research interests of the Commission which span the period from the Enlightenment to the evolution of Geographical Information Science. Apart from studies on general cartography, the volume, which reflects some co-operation with the ICA Commission on Maps and Society and the United States Geological Survey (USGS), contains regional studies on cartographic endeavours in Northern America, Brazil, and Southern Africa. The ICA Commission on Maps and Society participated as its field of study often overlaps with that of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography. The USGS which is the official USA mapping organisation, was invited to emphasise that the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography is not only interested in historical maps, but also has as mandate the research and document the history of Geographical Information Science. The ICA Commission on Maps and Society participated as its field of study often overlaps with that of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography. The USGS which is the official USA mapping organisation, was invited to emphasise that the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography is not only interested in historical maps, but also has as mandate the research and document the history of Geographical Information Science.

    • History

Women and Reform in a New England Community, 1815-1860


Author: Carolyn J. Lawes
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813148189
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 4575
Interpretations of women in the antebellum period have long dwelt upon the notion of public versus private gender spheres. As part of the ongoing reevaluation of the prehistory of the women's movement, Carolyn Lawes challenges this paradigm and the primacy of class motivation. She studies the women of antebellum Worcester, Massachusetts, discovering that whatever their economic background, women there publicly worked to remake and improve their community in their own image. Lawes analyzes the organized social activism of the mostly middle-class, urban, white women of Worcester and finds that they were at the center of community life and leadership. Drawing on rich local history collections, Lawes weaves together information from city and state documents, court cases, medical records, church collections, newspapers, and diaries and letters to create a portrait of a group of women for whom constant personal and social change was the norm. Throughout Women and Reform in a New England Community, conventional women make seemingly unconventional choices. A wealthy Worcester matron helped spark a women-led rebellion against ministerial authority in the town's orthodox Calvinist church. Similarly, a close look at the town's sewing circles reveals that they were vehicles for political exchange as well as social gatherings that included men but intentionally restricted them to a subordinate role. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the women of Worcester had taken up explicitly political and social causes, such as an orphan asylum they founded, funded, and directed. Lawes argues that economic and personal instability rather than a desire for social control motivated women, even relatively privileged ones, into social activism. She concludes that the local activism of the women of Worcester stimulated, and was stimulated by, their interest in the first two national women's rights conventions, held in Worcester in 1850 and 1851. Far from being marginalized from the vital economic, social, and political issues of their day, the women of this antebellum New England community insisted upon being active and ongoing participants in the debates and decisions of their society and nation.

    • History

Essays on the Context, Nature, and Influence of Isaac Newton’s Theology


Author: J.E. Force,R.H. Popkin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780792305835
Category: History
Page: 226
View: 3243
This collection of essays is the fruit of about fifteen years of discussion and research by James Force and me. As I look back on it, our interest and concern with Newton's theological ideas began in 1975 at Washington University in St. Louis. James Force was a graduate student in philosophy and I was a professor there. For a few years before, I had been doing research and writing on Millenarianism and Messianism in the 17th and 18th centuries, touching occasionally on Newton. I had bought a copy of Newton's Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St. John for a few pounds and, occasionally, read in it. In the Spring of 1975 I was giving a graduate seminar on Millenarian and Messianic ideas in the development of modem philosophy. Force was in the seminar. One day he came very excitedly up to me and said he wanted to write his dissertation on William Whiston. At that point in history, the only thing that came to my mind about Whiston was that he had published a, or the, standard translation of Josephus (which I also happened to have in my library. ) Force told me about the amazing views he had found in Whiston's notes on Josephus and in some of the few writings he could find in St. Louis by, or about, Whiston, who was Newton's successor as Lucasian Professor of mathematics at Cambridge and who wrote inordinately on Millenarian theology.