• Literary Criticism

Afro-American Literature in the Twentieth Century

The Achievement of Intimacy
Author: Michael G. Cooke
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300036244
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 241
View: 2002
Examines works by African American writers


    • Literary Criticism

Secret Histories

Reading Twentieth-Century American Literature
Author: David Wyatt
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801899232
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 424
View: 4285
And discovering a usable American past, as Wyatt shows, enables us to confront the urgencies of our present moment.

    • Literary Criticism

A History of American Literature


Author: Richard Gray
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444345680
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 912
View: 486
Updated throughout and with much new material, A History of American Literature, Second Edition, is the most up-to-date and comprehensive survey available of the myriad forms of American Literature from pre-Columbian times to the present. The most comprehensive and up-to-date history of American literature available today Covers fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction, as well as other forms of literature including folktale, spirituals, the detective story, the thriller, and science fiction Explores the plural character of American literature, including the contributions made by African American, Native American, Hispanic and Asian American writers Considers how our understanding of American literature has changed over the past?thirty years Situates American literature in the contexts of American history, politics and society Offers an invaluable introduction to American literature for students at all levels, academic and general readers

    • Literary Criticism

Music and Identity in Twentieth-Century Literature from Our America

Noteworthy Protagonists
Author: Marco Katz Montiel
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137433337
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 215
View: 5185
Offering a one-of-a-kind approach to music and literature of the Americas, this book examines the relationships between musical protagonists from Colombia, Cuba, and the United States in novels by writers such as Gabriel García Márquez, Alejo Carpentier, Zora Neale Hurston, and John Okada.

    • Literary Criticism

Propaganda and Aesthetics

The Literary Politics of African-American Magazines in the Twentieth Century
Author: Abby Arthur Johnson,Ronald Maberry Johnson
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9780870234026
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 248
View: 2151
A detailed work that weaves the histories of different magazines and their various strands of black political thought in this century, proving the claim that black magazines, in providing outlets for black writers and recording their concerns, are therefore historical documents in their own right.

    • Literary Criticism

Literature of Latin America


Author: Rafael Ocasio
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313320019
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 230
View: 4857
The major Latin American writers, and their works, are examined here in terms of their literary merit and cultural significance, and are considered against the backdrop of important historic events, presented in both timeline and narrative format, that have influenced the literary output of Latin America.

    • Literary Criticism

The Twentieth-Century Spanish American Novel


Author: Raymond Leslie Williams
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292774028
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 280
View: 6169
Spanish American novels of the Boom period (1962-1967) attracted a world readership to Latin American literature, but Latin American writers had already been engaging in the modernist experiments of their North American and European counterparts since the turn of the twentieth century. Indeed, the desire to be "modern" is a constant preoccupation in twentieth-century Spanish American literature and thus a very useful lens through which to view the century's novels. In this pathfinding study, Raymond L. Williams offers the first complete analytical and critical overview of the Spanish American novel throughout the entire twentieth century. Using the desire to be modern as his organizing principle, he divides the century's novels into five periods and discusses the differing forms that "the modern" took in each era. For each period, Williams begins with a broad overview of many novels, literary contexts, and some cultural debates, followed by new readings of both canonical and significant non-canonical novels. A special feature of this book is its emphasis on women writers and other previously ignored and/or marginalized authors, including experimental and gay writers. Williams also clarifies the legacy of the Boom, the Postboom, and the Postmodern as he introduces new writers and new novelistic trends of the 1990s.

    • Literary Criticism

Urban Underworlds

A Geography of Twentieth-century American Literature and Culture
Author: Thomas Heise
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813547849
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 292
View: 5974
Urban Underworlds is an exploration of city spaces, pathologized identities, lurid fears, and American literature. Surveying the 1890s to the 1990s, Thomas Heise chronicles how and why marginalized populations immigrant Americans in the Lower East Side, gays and lesbians in Greenwich Village and downtown Los Angeles, the black underclass in Harlem and Chicago, and the new urban poor dispersed across American cities have been selectively targeted as "urban underworlds" and their neighborhoods characterized as miasmas of disease and moral ruin. The quarantining of minority cultures helped to promote white, middle-class privilege. Following a diverse array of literary figures who differ with the assessment of the underworld as the space of the monstrous Other, Heise contends that it is a place where besieged and neglected communities are actively trying to take possession of their own neighborhoods.

    • History

Patriotic Gore

Studies in the Literature of the American Civil War
Author: Edmund Wilson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393312560
Category: History
Page: 816
View: 1788
Regarded by many critics as Edmund Wilson's greatest book, Patriotic Gore brilliantly portrays the vast political, spiritual, and material crisis of the Civil War as reflected in the lives and writings of some thirty representative Americans.

    • Literary Criticism

A People's History of English and American Literature


Author: Eugene V. Moran
Publisher: Nova Publishers
ISBN: 9781590333037
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 281
View: 2992
With special emphasis on literary merit, this book chronicles the literature of the great nations of Britain and America from their earliest origins to the twenty-first century.

    • Literary Criticism

Hunger Overcome?

Food and Resistance in Twentieth-century African American Literature
Author: Andrew Warnes
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820325293
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 218
View: 2373
African American writers have consistently drawn connections between hunger and illiteracy, and by extension between food and reading. This book investigates the juxtaposition of mulnutrition and spectacular food abundance as a key trope of African American writing.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Moral Agents: Eight Twentieth-Century American Writers


Author: Edward Mendelson
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590178068
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 224
View: 7778
A deeply considered and provocative new look at major American writers—including Saul Bellow, Norman Mailer, and W.H. Auden—Edward Mendelson’s Moral Agents is also a work of critical biography in the great tradition of Plutarch, Samuel Johnson, and Emerson. Any important writer, in Mendelson’s view, writes in response to an idea of the good life that is inseparable from the life the writer lives. Fusing biography and criticism and based on extensive new research, Moral Agents presents challenging new portraits of eight writers—novelists, critics, and poets—who transformed American literature in the turbulent twentieth century. Eight sharply distinctive individuals—inspired, troubled, hugely ambitious—who reimagined what it means to be a writer. There’s Saul Bellow, a novelist determined to rule as a patriarch, who, having been neglected by his father, in turn neglected his son in favor of young writers who presented themselves as his literary heirs. Norman Mailer’s extraordinary ambition, suppressed insecurity, and renegade metaphysics muddled the novels through which he hoped to change the world, yet these same qualities endowed him with an uncanny sensitivity and deep sympathy to the pathologies of American life that make him an unequaled political reporter. William Maxwell wrote sad tales of small-town life and surrounded himself with a coterie of worshipful admirers. As a powerful editor at The New Yorker, he exercised an enormous and constraining influence on American fiction that is still felt today. Preeminent among the critics is Lionel Trilling, whose Liberal Imagination made him a celebrity sage of the anxiously tranquilized 1950s, even as his calculated image of Olympian reserve masked a deeply conflicted life and contributed to his ultimately despairing worldview. Dwight Macdonald, by contrast, was a haute-WASP anarchist and aesthete driven by an exuberant moral commitment, in a time of cautious mediocrity, to doing the right thing. Alfred Kazin, from a poor Jewish émigré background, remained an outsider at the center of literary New York, driven both to escape from and do justice to the deepest meanings of his Jewish heritage. Perhaps most intriguing are the two poets, W.H. Auden and Frank O’Hara. Early in his career, Auden was tempted to don the mantle of the poet as prophet, but after his move from England to America he lived and wrote in a spirit of modesty and charity born out of a deeply idiosyncratic understanding of Christianity. O’Hara, tireless partygoer and pioneering curator at MoMA, wrote much of his poetry for private occasions. Its lasting power has proven to be something different from its avant-garde reputation: personal warmth, individuality, rootedness in ancient traditions, and openness to the world.

    • Literary Criticism

Black on Black

Twentieth-Century African American Writing about Africa
Author: John Cullen Gruesser
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 081315880X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 216
View: 9964
Black on Black provides the first comprehensive analysis of the modern African American literary response to Africa, from W.E.B. Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk to Alice Walker's The Color Purple. Combining cutting-edge theory, extensive historical and archival research, and close readings of individual texts, Gruesser reveals the diversity of the African American response to Countee Cullen's question, "What is Africa to Me?" John Gruesser uses the concept of Ethiopianism--the biblically inspired belief that black Americans would someday lead Africans and people of the diaspora to a bright future--to provide a framework for his study. Originating in the eighteenth century and inspiring religious and political movements throughout the 1800s, Ethiopianism dominated African American depictions of Africa in the first two decades of the twentieth century, particularly in the writings of Du Bois, Sutton Griggs, and Pauline Hopkins. Beginning with the Harlem Renaissance and continuing through the Italian invasion and occupation of Ethiopia, however, its influence on the portrayal of the continent slowly diminished. Ethiopianism's decline can first be seen in the work of writers closely associated with the New Negro Movement, including Alain Locke and Langston Hughes, and continued in the dramatic work of Shirley Graham, the novels of George Schuyler, and the poetry and prose of Melvin Tolson. The final rejection of Ethiopianism came after the dawning of the Cold War and roughly coincided with the advent of postcolonial Africa in works by authors such as Richard Wright, Lorraine Hansberry, and Alice Walker.

    • Literary Criticism

The Cambridge History of American Literature:


Author: Sacvan Bercovitch
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521585712
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 846
View: 2774
The Cambridge History of American Literature addresses the spectrum of new and established directions in American writing. An interdisciplinary distillation of American literary history, it weds the voice of traditional criticism with the diversity of interests that characterize contemporary literary studies. Volume 1 covers the colonial and early national periods, discussing authors ranging from Renaissance explorers to the poets and novelists of the new republic. It should prove an indispensable guide for scholars and students in the fields of English and American literatures and American history.

    • Literary Criticism

Exiles from a Future Time

The Forging of the Mid-Twentieth-Century Literary Left
Author: Alan M. Wald
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469608677
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 432
View: 3448
With this book, Alan Wald launches a bold and passionate account of the U.S. Literary Left from the 1920s through the 1960s. Exiles from a Future Time, the first volume of a trilogy, focuses on the forging of a Communist-led literary tradition in the 1930s. Exploring writers' intimate lives and heartfelt political commitments, Wald draws on original research in scores of archives and personal collections of papers; correspondence and interviews with hundreds of writers and their friends and families; and a treasure trove of unpublished memoirs, fiction, and poetry. In fashioning a "humanscape" of the Literary Left, Wald not only reassesses acclaimed authors but also returns to memory dozens of forgotten, talented writers. The authors range from the familiar Mike Gold, Langston Hughes, and Muriel Rukeyser to William Attaway, John Malcolm Brinnin, Stanley Burnshaw, Joy Davidman, Sol Funaroff, Joseph Freeman, Alfred Hayes, Eugene Clay Holmes, V. J. Jerome, Ruth Lechlitner, and Frances Winwar. Focusing on the formation of the tradition and the organization of the Cultural Left, Wald investigates the "elective affinity" of its avant-garde poets, the "Afro-cosmopolitanism" of its Black radical literary movement, and the uneasy negotiation between feminist concerns and class identity among its women writers.

    • Literary Criticism

The Chronology of American Literature

America's Literary Achievements from the Colonial Era to Modern Times
Author: Daniel S. Burt
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780618168217
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 805
View: 7076
Ranging from the colonial era to the present day, this authoritative reference encompasses the full range of American literary developments as it spotlights major and popular works of fiction, nonfiction, plays, and poetry; biographical profiles of authors; literary journals; and other trends, themes, award winners, and more.

    • Literary Criticism

AIDS Literature and Gay Identity

The Literature of Loss
Author: Monica B. Pearl
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136227938
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 200
View: 4863
This book discusses the significance of late twentieth century and early twenty first century American fiction written in response to the AIDS crisis and interrogates how sexual identity is depicted and constructed textually. Pearl develops Freudian psychoanalytic theory in a complex account of the ways in which grief is expressed and worked out in literature, showing how key texts from the AIDS crisis by authors such as Edmund White, Michael Cunningham, Eve Sedgwick – and also, later, the archives of The ACT UP Oral History Project - lie both within the tradition of gay writing and a postmodernist poetics. The book demonstrates how literary texts both expose and construct personal identity, how they expose and produce sexual identities, and how gay and queer identities were written onto the page, but also constructed and consolidated by these very texts. Pearl argues that the division between realist and postmodern, and gay and queer, respectively, is determined by whether the experience expressed and accounted is mediated through the psychoanalytic categories of mourning or melancholia, and is marked by a kind of coherence or chaos in the texts themselves. This study presents an important development in scholarly work in gay literary studies, queer theory, and AIDS representation.

    • Literary Criticism

The First Book

Twentieth-Century Poetic Careers in America
Author: Jesse Zuba
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400873797
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 232
View: 5377
"We have many poets of the First Book," the poet and critic Louis Simpson remarked in 1957, describing a sense that the debut poetry collection not only launched the contemporary poetic career but also had come to define it. Surveying American poetry over the past hundred years, The First Book explores the emergence of the poetic debut as a unique literary production with its own tradition, conventions, and dynamic role in the literary market. Through new readings of poets ranging from Wallace Stevens and Marianne Moore to John Ashbery and Louise Glück, Jesse Zuba illuminates the importance of the first book in twentieth-century American literary culture, which involved complex struggles for legitimacy on the part of poets, critics, and publishers alike. Zuba investigates poets' diverse responses to the question of how to launch a career in an increasingly professionalized literary scene that threatened the authenticity of the poetic calling. He shows how modernist debuts evoke markedly idiosyncratic paths, while postwar first books evoke trajectories that balance professional imperatives with traditional literary ideals. Debut titles ranging from Simpson's The Arrivistes to Ken Chen's Juvenilia stress the strikingly pervasive theme of beginning, accommodating a new demand for career development even as it distances the poets from that demand. Combining literary analysis with cultural history, The First Book will interest scholars and students of twentieth-century literature as well as readers and writers of poetry.

    • Language Arts & Disciplines

The Cambridge History of Latin American Literature


Author: Roberto Gonzalez Echevarría,Enrique Pupo-Walker
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521340700
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 619
View: 5896
"Primary and vital resource for literary specialists, historians, students of all levels, and general readers interested in this period. Leading scholars write about diverse genres (narrative, essay, poetry, theater) and cultural interests and ideas (intellectual life, historiography, Viceregal culture, Mesoamerican indigenous peoples and cultures). Literature articles include analysis and discussion of canonic and previously marginalized authors and treat representative works, genres, and literary and philosophical currents. Extremely useful, well written, and interesting"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.