• History

The Mapmakers


Author: John Noble Wilford
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0375708502
Category: History
Page: 507
View: 1343
Examines the technology and significant figures of cartography, including the accuracy of ancient Chinese maps, contributions by such navigators as Ferdinand Magellan and James Cook, and the development of a current Global Positioning System.

    • Philosophy

A Bible for a Thoughtful Skeptic

The Natural History of Intelligence
Author: Thom Pain
Publisher: Thom Pain Jr.
ISBN: 1413478859
Category: Philosophy
Page: 344
View: 9516
This book makes the case for realistic faith in the power of intelligence as opposed to blind faith in the pronouncements of those who claim infallibility or divine guidance. The author, Thom Pain, identifies the discoveries of systems and information theory early in the twentieth century as the key to a naturalistic explanation of purposeful life and intelligence and to the last stage in the emancipation of science from theology. He begins his story with the discoveries that revealed the memory mechanism as a built-in "tropisms for truth" that gave even primitive creatures a logical tool for improving their decisions and solving their problems. It is a story that reveals a surprisingly early version of intelligence and an amazing versatility in the types and range of intelligence. When one species developed symbolic languages, it becomes the story of the cultural developments of the human species. As civilization evolved, Thom identifies the rulers and the ruling classes as both the leaders and the obstacles to intellectual progress. In their new role, the rulers either claimed to be gods or the representative of the gods and often led the exploitation that had become the privilege of conquers and of the ruling classes. Indoctrinated faith and loyalty became authoritarian tools of aggression and oppression. In this cruel environment, religion also became a source of moral strength and initiative for the oppressed and religious rebels were often the leaders in the struggles for political and intellectual freedom. These struggles were not about the belief in God but about the abuses of authority by those who claimed to be the representatives of God. Thom follows this story as it sharpened the distinction between reason and theology and led to the modern concepts of democracy and personal and religious freedom.

    • History

Mapping an Empire

The Geographical Construction of British India, 1765-1843
Author: Matthew H. Edney
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226184876
Category: History
Page: 458
View: 1147
In this fascinating history of the British surveys of India, Matthew H. Edney relates how imperial Britain used modern survey techniques to not only create and define the spatial image of its Empire, but also to legitimate its colonialist activities. "There is much to be praised in this book. It is an excellent history of how India came to be painted red in the nineteenth century. But more importantly, Mapping an Empire sets a new standard for books that examine a fundamental problem in the history of European imperialism."—D. Graham Burnett, Times Literary Supplement "Mapping an Empire is undoubtedly a major contribution to the rapidly growing literature on science and empire, and a work which deserves to stimulate a great deal of fresh thinking and informed research."—David Arnold, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History "This case study offers broadly applicable insights into the relationship between ideology, technology and politics. . . . Carefully read, this is a tale of irony about wishful thinking and the limits of knowledge."—Publishers Weekly

    • History

Mapping the Cold War

Cartography and the Framing of America’s International Power
Author: Timothy Barney
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469618559
Category: History
Page: 338
View: 6992
In this fascinating history of Cold War cartography, Timothy Barney considers maps as central to the articulation of ideological tensions between American national interests and international aspirations. Barney argues that the borders, scales, projections, and other conventions of maps prescribed and constrained the means by which foreign policy elites, popular audiences, and social activists navigated conflicts between North and South, East and West. Maps also influenced how identities were formed in a world both shrunk by advancing technologies and marked by expanding and shifting geopolitical alliances and fissures. Pointing to the necessity of how politics and values were "spatialized" in recent U.S. history, Barney argues that Cold War–era maps themselves had rhetorical lives that began with their conception and production and played out in their circulation within foreign policy circles and popular media. Reflecting on the ramifications of spatial power during the period, Mapping the Cold War ultimately demonstrates that even in the twenty-first century, American visions of the world--and the maps that account for them--are inescapably rooted in the anxieties of that earlier era.

    • Science

Digital Places

Living with Geographic Information Technologies
Author: Michael Curry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134792360
Category: Science
Page: 208
View: 6005
By offering an understanding of Geographic Information Systems within the social, economic, legal, political and ethical contexts within which they exist, the author shows that there are substantial limits to their ability to represent the very objects and relationships, people and places, that many believe to be most important. Focusing on the ramifications of GIS usage, Digital Places shows that they are associated with far-reaching changes in the institutions in which they exist, and in the lives of those they touch. In the end they call for a complete rethinking of basic ideas, like privacy and intellectual property and the nature of scientific practice, that have underpinned public life for the last one hundred years.

    • Political Science

Dominion from Sea to Sea

Pacific Ascendancy and American Power
Author: Bruce Cumings
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300154979
Category: Political Science
Page: 608
View: 4095
America is the first world power to inhabit an immense land mass open at both ends to the world’s two largest oceans—the Atlantic and the Pacific. This gives America a great competitive advantage often overlooked by Atlanticists, whose focus remains overwhelmingly fixed on America’s relationship with Europe. Bruce Cumings challenges the Atlanticist perspective in this innovative new history, arguing that relations with Asia influenced our history greatly. Cumings chronicles how the movement westward, from the Middle West to the Pacific, has shaped America’s industrial, technological, military, and global rise to power. He unites domestic and international history, international relations, and political economy to demonstrate how technological change and sharp economic growth have created a truly bicoastal national economy that has led the world for more than a century. Cumings emphasizes the importance of American encounters with Mexico, the Philippines, and the nations of East Asia. The result is a wonderfully integrative history that advances a strong argument for a dual approach to American history incorporating both Atlanticist and Pacificist perspectives.

    • History

Sea of Glory

America's Voyage of Discovery, The U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842
Author: Nathaniel Philbrick
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781440649103
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 4765
"A treasure of a book."—David McCullough A New York Times Notable Book America's first frontier was not the West; it was the sea, and no one writes more eloquently about that watery wilderness than Nathaniel Philbrick. In his bestselling In the Heart of the Sea Philbrick probed the nightmarish dangers of the vast Pacific. Now, in an epic sea adventure, he writes about one of the most ambitious voyages of discovery the Western world has ever seen—the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842. On a scale that dwarfed the journey of Lewis and Clark, six magnificent sailing vessels and a crew of hundreds set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean and ended up naming the newly discovered continent of Antarctica, collecting what would become the basis of the Smithsonian Institution. Combining spellbinding human drama and meticulous research, Philbrick reconstructs the dark saga of the voyage to show why, instead of being celebrated and revered as that of Lewis and Clark, it has—until now—been relegated to a footnote in the national memory. Winner of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize

    • History

The Measure of Reality

Quantification in Western Europe, 1250–1600
Author: Alfred W. Crosby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107651042
Category: History
Page: 262
View: 6801
Western Europeans were among the first, if not the first, to invent mechanical clocks, geometrically precise maps, double-entry bookkeeping, precise algebraic and musical notations, and perspective painting. By the sixteenth century more people were thinking quantitatively in western Europe than in any other part of the world. The Measure of Reality, first published in 1997, discusses the epochal shift from qualitative to quantitative perception in Western Europe during the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. This shift made modern science, technology, business practice and bureaucracy possible.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Contemporary Authors


Author: Scot Peacock
Publisher: Gale Cengage
ISBN: 9780787646141
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 480
View: 5456
In response to the escalating need for up-to-date information on writers, Contemporary Authors(r) New Revision Series brings researchers the most recent data on the world's most-popular authors. These exciting and unique author profiles are essential to your holdings because sketches are entirely revised and up-to-date, and completely replace the original Contemporary Authors(r) entries. For your convenience, a soft-cover cumulative index is sent biannually

    • Social Science

Reordering the World

Geopolitical Perspectives on the Twenty-First Century
Author: George J. Demko
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 350
View: 8973


    • History

Mapping the world

an illustrated history of cartography
Author: Ralph E. Ehrenberg,National Geographic Society (U.S.)
Publisher: Natl Geographic Society
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 4519
Mapping the World is a one-of-a-kind collection of cartographic treasures spanning thousands of years and many cultures, from an ancient Babylonian map of the world etched on clay to the latest high-tech maps of the earth, the seas, and the skies above. With more than one hundred maps and other illustrations and an introduction and commentary by Ralph E. Ehrenberg, former Chief of the Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress, this book tells a fascinating story of geographic discovery, scientific invention, the art of mapmaking, and the efforts of mapmakers everywhere to render our shape-shifting world in ever more innovative and meaningful ways. The book draws from the finest map collections in the world, including the libraries of the National Geographic Society, the Library of Congress, and the British Library, and is organized into several chronological sections. Each section includes a brief introduction that places the maps in their historical context, followed by a gallery of cartographic masterpieces from different parts of the world, giving readers a unique comparative perspective on the state of geographic knowledge and mapmaking during different historical periods. Special "portfolios" within each section feature key cartographic innovators and maps of exceptional artistic quality or significance, such as the Waldseemuller Map, the first to use the name America; or the life and work of a groundbreaking cartographer, such as Gerardus Mercator, who gave us the Mercator projection; or the latest computer-generated maps that open new windows on the cosmos. In addition to including examples of all the world's most prized and famous maps of exploration and discovery, the book features many other examples of maps that rarely get the attention they deserve---geological maps, road maps, prisoner escape maps, tourist maps, city maps, military situation maps, mental maps, and much more. With its broad historical and cultural range, unmatched variety of maps from many of the finest map collections in the world, more than one hundred illustrations, and a fresh and authoritative perspective on the history of cartography, Mapping the World will delight everyone with an interest in maps and mapmaking like no other book on the subject.

    • Cartography

The Globe


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Cartography
Page: N.A
View: 1384

    • Science

The Story of Measurement


Author: Andrew Robinson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Science
Page: 224
View: 7625
Discusses humanity's fascination with measurement and describes different measuring methods in a historical context, including currency, natural disasters, and the body mass index.

Rotunda


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 8182

    • Reference

Information sources in cartography


Author: C. R. Perkins,Robert B. Parry
Publisher: K G Saur Verlag Gmbh & Co
ISBN: 9780408024587
Category: Reference
Page: 540
View: 908

    • Geology

California Geology


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Geology
Page: N.A
View: 5778

    • Nature

How the ocean works

an introduction to oceanography
Author: Mark W. Denny
Publisher: Princeton Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Nature
Page: 320
View: 5484
The world's oceans account for roughly 71 percent of the planet's surface and 99 percent of its livable volume. Any study of this huge habitat requires a solid foundation in the principles that underlie marine biology and physical and chemical oceanography, yet until now undergraduate textbooks have largely presented compilations of facts rather than explanations of principles.How the Ocean Worksfills this gap, providing a concise and accessible college-level introduction to marine science that is also ideal for general readers. How are winds and currents driven? What is the dilemma of the two-layered ocean? Mark Denny explains key concepts like these in rich and fascinating detail. He explores early scientific knowledge of oceans, photosynthesis, trophic interactions and energy flow, and the impacts of human activities on marine and atmospheric systems. Focusing each chapter on a major topic and carefully explaining the principles and theory involved, Denny gives readers the conceptual building blocks needed to develop a coherent picture of the living ocean.How the Ocean Worksis an indispensable resource that teaches readers how to think about the ocean--its biology, mechanics, and conservation. Provides a concise, up-to-date introduction to marine science Develops the conceptual basis needed to understand how the ocean works Explains fundamental principles and theory Includes color illustrations and informative diagrams Serves as a college textbook and a reference for general readers

    • Technology & Engineering

Maps that made history

the influential, the eccentric and the sublime
Author: Lez Smart
Publisher: National Archives & Records Administration
ISBN: N.A
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 191
View: 7968
"Few people can resist the appeal of old maps, whether their interest is in history, geography, or beautiful cartography. Here we present 25 examples, reproduced large-scale with magnified details. This collection features maps that record major and minor events; maps that have influenced and inspired; even maps that have deceived. Each gives insight into the times in which it was created. Lez Smart tells the story behind each map and reflects on what it reveals about its makers and users, from the early cartographers to the Elizabethan explorers to the soldiers of the Second World War."--BOOK JACKET.