• Political Science

The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and the Kennedy Administration, 1960-1964

A History in Documents
Author: James P. Marshall
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807168769
Category: Political Science
Page: 392
View: 4145
In the early 1960s, civil rights activists and the Kennedy administration engaged in parallel, though not always complementary, efforts to overcome Mississippi’s extreme opposition to racial desegregation. In The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and the Kennedy Administration, 1960–1964, James P. Marshall uncovers this history through primary source documents that explore the legal and political strategies of the federal government, follows the administration’s changing and sometimes contentious relationship with civil rights organizations, and reveals the tactics used by local and state entities in Mississippi to stem the advancement of racial equality. A historian and longtime civil rights activist, Marshall collects a vast array of documents from the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and excerpts from his own 1960s interviews with leading figures in the movement for racial justice. This volume tracks early forms of resistance to racial parity adopted by the White Citizens’ Councils and chapters of the Ku Klux Klan at the local level as well as by Mississippi congressmen and other elected officials who used both legal obstructionism and extra-legal actions to block efforts meant to promote integration. Quoting from interviews and correspondence among the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee members, government officials, and other constituents of the Democratic Party, Marshall also explores decisions about voter registration drives and freedom rides as well as formal efforts by the Kennedy administration—including everything from minority hiring initiatives to federal litigation and party platform changes—to exert pressure on Mississippi to end segregation. Through a carefully curated selection of letters, interviews, government records, and legal documents, The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and the Kennedy Administration, 1960–1964 sheds new light on the struggle to advance racial justice for African Americans living in the Magnolia State.

    • Political Science

The Second Reconstruction

A History of the Modern Civil Rights Movement
Author: Gary Donaldson
Publisher: Krieger Publishing Company
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 153
View: 5336
This text traces the history of the civil rights movement in the years following World War II, to the present day. Issues discussed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights of 1965, and the Northern Ireland ghetto's.

    • History

Local People

The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi
Author: John Dittmer
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252065071
Category: History
Page: 530
View: 8214
Details the Black struggle for civil rights in Mississippi

    • History

Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi

Protest Politics and the Struggle for Racial Justice, 1960-1965
Author: James P. Marshall
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807149845
Category: History
Page: 300
View: 5130
"In 1960, students supporting civil rights moved into Mississippi and challenged white supremacy by encouraging African Americans to reassert the rights guaranteed them under the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution. The ensuing social upheaval changed the state forever. In Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi, James P. Marshall, a former civil rights activist, tells the complete story of the quest for racial equality in Mississippi. Using a variety of sources as well as his own memories, Marshall weaves together an astonishing account of student protestors and local activists who risked their lives by fighting against southern resistance and federal inaction. Their efforts, and the horrific violence inflicted on them, helped push many non-southerners and the federal government into action, culminating in the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act--measures that destroyed legalized segregation and disfranchisement."--Publisher description.

    • Political Science

The Bystander

John F. Kennedy and the Struggle for Black Equality
Author: Nick Bryant
Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)
ISBN: 9780465008278
Category: Political Science
Page: 545
View: 7729
Traces the history of John F. Kennedy's civil rights record, arguing that his erratic handling of the issue led to his failure to enact genuine reform and to an increasingly violent battle over civil rights in the streets.

    • History

Women and the Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1965


Author: Davis W. Houck
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1604737603
Category: History
Page: 351
View: 671
Presents thirty-nine full-text addresses by women who spoke out while the struggle for civil rights was at its most intense. Many are published or transcribed from audio tape for the first time. Each speech is preceded by an introduction of the speaker and occasion that highlights key biographical and background details. The collection also provides a general introduction that places these public addresses in context.

    • History

Lighting the Fires of Freedom

African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement
Author: Janet Dewart Bell
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1620973367
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 9609
One of Book Riot's “29 Amazing New Books Coming in 2018” A groundbreaking collection based on oral histories that brilliantly plumb the leadership of African American women in the twentieth-century fight for civil rights—many nearly lost to history—from the latest winner of the Studs and Ida Terkel Prize During the Civil Rights Movement, African American women were generally not in the headlines; they simply did the work that needed to be done. Yet despite their significant contributions at all levels of the movement, they remain mostly invisible to the larger public. Beyond Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King, and Dorothy Height, most Americans, black and white alike, would be hard-pressed to name other leaders at the community, local, and national levels. In Lighting the Fires of Freedom Janet Dewart Bell shines a light on women’s all-too-often overlooked achievements in the Movement. Through wide-ranging conversations with nine women, several now in their nineties with decades of untold stories, we hear what ignited and fueled their activism, as Bell vividly captures their inspiring voices. Lighting the Fires of Freedom offers these deeply personal and intimate accounts of extraordinary struggles for justice that resulted in profound social change, stories that remain important and relevant today. Published to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, Lighting the Fires of Freedom is a vital document for understanding the Civil Rights Movement and an enduring testament to the vitality of women’s leadership during one of the most dramatic periods of American history.

    • Juvenile Nonfiction

Passing of the Civil Rights Act Of 1964


Author: Xina M. Uhl
Publisher: ABDO
ISBN: 1629699497
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 48
View: 9975
This title will inform readers about the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The title will discuss those involved, such as John F. Kennedy--who spoke about civil rights in 1963--as well as Lyndon B. Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and more. Vivid details, well-chosen photographs, and primary sources bring this story and this case to life. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Core Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Parting the Waters

America in the King Years 1954-63
Author: Taylor Branch
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416558683
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 1088
View: 9215
In volume one of his America in the King Years, Pulitzer Prize winner Taylor Branch gives a masterly account of the American civil rights movement. Hailed as the most masterful story ever told of the American civil rights movement, Parting the Waters is destined to endure for generations. Moving from the fiery political baptism of Martin Luther King, Jr., to the corridors of Camelot where the Kennedy brothers weighed demands for justice against the deceptions of J. Edgar Hoover, here is a vivid tapestry of America, torn and finally transformed by a revolutionary struggle unequaled since the Civil War. Taylor Branch provides an unsurpassed portrait of King's rise to greatness and illuminates the stunning courage and private conflict, the deals, maneuvers, betrayals, and rivalries that determined history behind closed doors, at boycotts and sit-ins, on bloody freedom rides, and through siege and murder. Epic in scope and impact, Branch's chronicle definitively captures one of the nation's most crucial passages.

    • History

Mothers of Massive Resistance

White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy
Author: Elizabeth Gillespie McRae
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019027171X
Category: History
Page: 360
View: 2917
Introduction: Segregation's constant gardeners -- Massive support for segregation, 1920-1942 -- The color line in Virginia: the home grown production of white supremacy -- Citizenship education for a segregated nation -- Campaigning for a Jim Crow south -- Jim Crow storytelling -- Massive resistance to the black freedom struggle -- Partisan betrayals: a bad woman, weak white men, and the end of a party -- Jim Crow's international enemies and nationwide allies -- Threats within: black southerners, 1954-1956 -- White women, white youth, and the hope of the nation -- Conclusion: the new national face of segregation: Boston women against busing

    • History

Three Years in Mississippi


Author: James Meredith
Publisher: Civil Rights in Mississippi
ISBN: 9781496821010
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 5646
The first-person account of a daring, extraordinary blow against segregation

    • Biography & Autobiography

The Wrong Side of Murder Creek

A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement
Author: Bob Zellner
Publisher: NewSouth Books
ISBN: 9781603061049
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 351
View: 6189
Even forty years after the civil rights movement, the transition from son and grandson of Klansmen to field secretary of SNCC seems quite a journey. In the early 1960s, when Bob Zellner’s professors and classmates at a small church school in Alabama thought he was crazy for even wanting to do research on civil rights, it was nothing short of remarkable. Now, in his long-awaited memoir, Zellner tells how one white Alabamian joined ranks with the black students who were sitting-in, marching, fighting, and sometimes dying to challenge the Southern “way of life” he had been raised on but rejected. Decades later, he is still protesting on behalf of social change and equal rights. Fortunately, he took the time, with co-author Constance Curry, to write down his memories and reflections. He was in all the campaigns and was close to all the major figures. He was beaten, arrested, and reviled by some but admired and revered by others. The Wrong Side of Murder Creek, winner of the 2009 Lillian Smith Book Award, is Bob Zellner’s larger-than-life story, and it was worth waiting for.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Robert F. Kennedy and the Shaping of Civil Rights, 1960-1964


Author: Philip A. Goduti, Jr.
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786449438
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 251
View: 5924
"This book explores how the Kennedy brothers and civil rights leaders, such as Martin Luther King, Jr., John Lewis and James Meredith, pushed for change at a critical time in the civil rights movement. It explores Robert Kennedy's role in key events including Freedom Rides (1961), Ole Miss crisis (1962), and Birmingham campaign and March on Washington (1963)"--Provided by publisher.

Letter from the Birmingham Jail


Author: Jr. Martin Luther King
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781535599818
Category:
Page: 26
View: 8724
Original text of Martin Luther King Jr.'s open letter from jail, written in April 1963.

    • History

The Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi


Author: Ted Ownby
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1617039330
Category: History
Page: 318
View: 7349
Based on new research and combining multiple scholarly approaches, these twelve essays tell new stories about the civil rights movement in the state most resistant to change. Wesley Hogan, Françoise N. Hamlin, and Michael Vinson Williams raise questions about how civil rights organizing took place. Three pairs of essays address African Americans' and whites' stories on education, religion, and the issues of violence. Jelani Favors and Robert Luckett analyze civil rights issues on the campuses of Jackson State University and the University of Mississippi. Carter Dalton Lyon and Joseph T. Reiff study people who confronted the question of how their religion related to their possible involvement in civil rights activism. By studying the Ku Klux Klan and the Deacons for Defense in Mississippi, David Cunningham and Akinyele Umoja ask who chose to use violence or to raise its possibility. The final three chapters describe some of the consequences and continuing questions raised by the civil rights movement. Byron D'Andra Orey analyzes the degree to which voting rights translated into political power for African American legislators. Chris Myers Asch studies a Freedom School that started in recent years in the Mississippi Delta. Emilye Crosby details the conflicting memories of Claiborne County residents and the parts of the civil rights movement they recall or ignore. As a group, the essays introduce numerous new characters and conundrums into civil rights scholarship, advance efforts to study African Americans and whites as interactive agents in the complex stories, and encourage historians to pull civil rights scholarship closer toward the present.

    • History

James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot

A Soldier's Story
Author: Henry T. Gallagher
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1617036544
Category: History
Page: 230
View: 1973
In September 1962, James Meredith became the first African American admitted to the University of Mississippi. A milestone in the civil rights movement, his admission triggered a riot spurred by a mob of three thousand whites from across the South and all but officially stoked by the state’s segregationist authorities. Historians have called the Oxford riot nothing less than an insurrection and the worst constitutional crisis since the Civil War. The escalating conflict prompted President John F. Kennedy to send twenty thousand regular army troops, in addition to federalized Mississippi National Guard soldiers, into the civil unrest (ten thousand into the town itself) to quell rioters and restore law and order. James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot is the memoir of one of the participants, a young army second lieutenant named Henry Gallagher, born and raised in Minnesota. His military police battalion from New Jersey deployed, without the benefit of riot-control practice or advance briefing, into a deadly civil rights confrontation. He was thereafter assigned as the officer-in-charge of Meredith’s security detail at a time when he faced very real threats to his life. Gallagher’s first-person account considers the performance of his fellow soldiers before and after the riot. He writes of the behavior of the white students, some of them defiant, others perceiving a Communist-inspired Kennedy conspiracy in Meredith’s entry into Mississippi’s “flagship” university. The author depicts the student, Meredith, a man who at times seemed disconnected with the violent reality that swirled around him, and who even aspired to be freed of his protectors so that he could just be another Ole Miss student. James Meredith and the Ole Miss Riot is both an invaluable perspective on a pivotal moment in American history and an in-depth look at a unique home-front military action. From the vantage of the fiftieth anniversary of the riot, Henry T. Gallagher reveals the young man he was in the midst of one of history’s most profound tests, a soldier from the Midwest encountering the powder keg of the Old South and its violent racial divisions.

    • History

Negroes with Guns


Author: Robert Franklin Williams
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814327142
Category: History
Page: 89
View: 3909
First published in 1962, Negroes with Guns is the story of a southern black community's struggle to arm itself in self-defense against the Ku Klux Klan and other racist groups. Frustrated and angered by violence condoned or abetted by the local authorities against blacks, the small community of Monroe, North Carolina, brought the issue of armed self-defense to the forefront of the civil rights movement. The single most important intellectual influence on Huey P. Newton, the founder of the Black Panther Party, Negroes with Guns is a classic story of a man who risked his life for democracy and freedom.

    • Political Science

Doing History from the Bottom Up

On E.P. Thompson, Howard Zinn, and Rebuilding the Labor Movement from Below
Author: Staughton Lynd
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608464539
Category: Political Science
Page: 250
View: 4245
In the 1960s historians on both sides of the Atlantic began to challenge the assumptions of their colleagues and push for an understanding of history "from below." In this collection, Staughton Lynd, himself one of the pioneers of this approach, laments the passing of fellow luminaries David Montgomery, E.P. Thompson, Alfred Young, and Howard Zinn, and makes the case that contemporary academics and activists alike should take more seriously the stories and perspectives of Native Americans, slaves, rank-and-file workers, and other still-too-frequently marginalized voices. Staughton Lynd is an American conscientious objector, Quaker, peace activist and civil rights activist, tax resister, historian, professor, author, and lawyer.

    • History

The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939


Author: Robert L Harris Jr.,Rosalyn Terborg-Penn
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023151087X
Category: History
Page: 456
View: 3754
This book is a multifaceted approach to understanding the central developments in African American history since 1939. It combines a historical overview of key personalities and movements with essays by leading scholars on specific facets of the African American experience, a chronology of events, and a guide to further study. Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, the editors chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods; consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in U.S. society; discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass; and address the complexity of the contemporary African American experience. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g.,"Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American". While emphasizing political and social developments, this volume also illuminates important economic, military, and cultural themes. An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 provides a thorough understanding of a crucial historical period.

    • History

Hanging Bridge

Racial Violence and America's Civil Rights Century
Author: Jason Morgan Ward
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199376573
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 4114
Lying just south of Neshoba County, where three civil rights workers were murdered during Freedom Summer, Clarke County lay squarely in Mississippi's--and America's--meanest corner. Even at the height of the civil rights movement in the 1960s, when the clarion call for equality and justice echoed around the country, few volunteers ventured there. Fewer still remained. Local African Americans knew why the movement had taken so long to reach them. Some spoke of a bottomless pit in the snaking Chickasawhay River in the town of Shubuta, into which white vigilantes dumped bodies. Others pointed to old steel-framed bridge across that same muddy creek. Spanning three generations, Hanging Bridge reconstructs two wartime lynchings--the 1918 killing of two young men and two pregnant women, and the 1942 slaying of two adolescent boys--that propped up Mississippi's white supremacist regime and hastened its demise. These organized murders reverberated well into the 1960s, when local civil rights activists again faced off against racial terrorism and more refined forms of repression. Connecting the lynchings at Hanging Bridge to each other and then to civil rights-era struggles over segregation, voting, poverty, Black Power, and Vietnam, Jason Morgan Ward's haunting book traces the legacy of violence that reflects the American experience of race, from the depths of Jim Crow to the emergence of a national campaign for racial equality. In the process it creates a narrative that links living memory and meticulous research, illuminating one of the darkest places in American history and revealing the resiliency of the human spirit.