• Psychology

The Most Dangerous Animal

Human Nature and the Origins of War
Author: David Livingstone Smith
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312537449
Category: Psychology
Page: 288
View: 6558
A multidisciplinary study draws on elements of anthropology, psychology, and evolutionary theory to analyze the relationship between human nature and the history of warfare, offering a disturbing look at humankind's innate penchant for war. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.

    • Science

Less Than Human

Why We Demean, Enslave, and Exterminate Others
Author: David Livingstone Smith
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781429968560
Category: Science
Page: 336
View: 7542
Winner of the 2012 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Nonfiction A revelatory look at why we dehumanize each other, with stunning examples from world history as well as today's headlines "Brute." "Cockroach." "Lice." "Vermin." "Dog." "Beast." These and other monikers are constantly in use to refer to other humans—for political, religious, ethnic, or sexist reasons. Human beings have a tendency to regard members of their own kind as less than human. This tendency has made atrocities like the Holocaust, the genocide in Rwanda, and the slave trade possible, and yet we still find it in phenomena such as xenophobia, homophobia, military propaganda, and racism. Less Than Human draws on a rich mix of history, psychology, biology, anthropology and philosophy to document the pervasiveness of dehumanization, describe its forms, and explain why we so often resort to it. David Livingstone Smith posits that this behavior is rooted in human nature, but gives us hope in also stating that biological traits are malleable, showing us that change is possible. Less Than Human is a chilling indictment of our nature, and is as timely as it is relevant.

    • Psychology

Why We Lie

The Evolutionary Roots of Deception and the Unconscious Mind
Author: David Livingstone Smith
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312310400
Category: Psychology
Page: 256
View: 6508
A biological and psychological analysis of the human practice of lying reveals the role played by deception and self-deception in evolution, demonstrating how the structure of the brain is shaped by a need to deceive. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.

    • Philosophy

Created from Animals

The Moral Implications of Darwinism
Author: James Rachels
Publisher: OUP UK
ISBN: N.A
Category: Philosophy
Page: 245
View: 6211
Argues for the replacement of traditional ideas of human superiority with a more enlightened ethic regarding the value of non-human life, and discusses suicide, euthanasia, and animal rights.

    • Science

The Social Conquest of Earth


Author: Edward O. Wilson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0871403307
Category: Science
Page: 352
View: 8468
New York Times Bestseller From the most celebrated heir to Darwin comes a groundbreaking book on evolution, the summa work of Edward O. Wilson's legendary career. Sparking vigorous debate in the sciences, The Social Conquest of Earth upends “the famous theory that evolution naturally encourages creatures to put family first” (Discover). Refashioning the story of human evolution, Wilson draws on his remarkable knowledge of biology and social behavior to demonstrate that group selection, not kin selection, is the premier driving force of human evolution. In a work that James D. Watson calls “a monumental exploration of the biological origins of the human condition,” Wilson explains how our innate drive to belong to a group is both a “great blessing and a terrible curse” (Smithsonian). Demonstrating that the sources of morality, religion, and the creative arts are fundamentally biological in nature, the renowned Harvard University biologist presents us with the clearest explanation ever produced as to the origin of the human condition and why it resulted in our domination of the Earth’s biosphere.

    • Nature

Demonic Males

Apes and the Origins of Human Violence
Author: Richard W. Wrangham,Dale Peterson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780395877432
Category: Nature
Page: 350
View: 1401
Draws on recent discoveries about human evolution to examine whether violence among men is a product of their primitive heritage, and searches for solutions to the problems of war, rape, and murder

The Human Animal


Author: Tess Martin
Publisher: Amelie Publishing LLC
ISBN: 9780990629504
Category:
Page: 410
View: 942
In a dystopian future, the government is overthrown and the new order protects animal rights with a heavy handed brutality. Consuming meat has become illegal and the agency tasked with enforcing the law is given free reign to do as they see fit. One experienced agent has a life changing encounter that shakes his core and forces him to examine his life while putting him at risk for becoming the target of his own organization.

    • Psychology

The Blank Slate

The Modern Denial of Human Nature
Author: Steven Pinker
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101200322
Category: Psychology
Page: 528
View: 8752
A brilliant inquiry into the origins of human nature. "Sweeping, erudite, sharply argued, and fun to read..also highly persuasive." -Time Now updated with a new afterword One of the world's leading experts on language and the mind explores the idea of human nature and its moral, emotional, and political colorings. With characteristic wit, lucidity, and insight, Pinker argues that the dogma that the mind has no innate traits-a doctrine held by many intellectuals during the past century-denies our common humanity and our individual preferences, replaces objective analyses of social problems with feel-good slogans, and distorts our understanding of politics, violence, parenting, and the arts. Injecting calm and rationality into debates that are notorious for ax-grinding and mud-slinging, Pinker shows the importance of an honest acknowledgment of human nature based on science and common sense.

    • Political Science

World on Fire

How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability
Author: Amy Chua
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 1400076374
Category: Political Science
Page: 368
View: 5448
The reigning consensus holds that the combination of free markets and democracy would transform the third world and sweep away the ethnic hatred and religious zealotry associated with underdevelopment. In this revelatory investigation of the true impact of globalization, Yale Law School professor Amy Chua explains why many developing countries are in fact consumed by ethnic violence after adopting free market democracy. Chua shows how in non-Western countries around the globe, free markets have concentrated starkly disproportionate wealth in the hands of a resented ethnic minority. These “market-dominant minorities” – Chinese in Southeast Asia, Croatians in the former Yugoslavia, whites in Latin America and South Africa, Indians in East Africa, Lebanese in West Africa, Jews in post-communist Russia – become objects of violent hatred. At the same time, democracy empowers the impoverished majority, unleashing ethnic demagoguery, confiscation, and sometimes genocidal revenge. She also argues that the United States has become the world’s most visible market-dominant minority, a fact that helps explain the rising tide of anti-Americanism around the world. Chua is a friend of globalization, but she urges us to find ways to spread its benefits and curb its most destructive aspects.

    • Psychology

The Better Angels of Our Nature

Why Violence Has Declined
Author: Steven Pinker
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: 0143122010
Category: Psychology
Page: 802
View: 1970
Presents a controversial history of violence which argues that today's world is the most peaceful time in human existence, drawing on psychological insights into intrinsic values that are causing people to condemn violence as an acceptable measure.

    • Philosophy

The Human Animal

Personal Identity without Psychology
Author: Eric T. Olson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198026471
Category: Philosophy
Page: 200
View: 7501
Most philosophers writing about personal identity in recent years claim that what it takes for us to persist through time is a matter of psychology. In this groundbreaking new book, Eric Olson argues that such approaches face daunting problems, and he defends in their place a radically non-psychological account of personal identity. He defines human beings as biological organisms, and claims that no psychological relation is either sufficient or necessary for an organism to persist. Rejecting several famous thought experiments dealing with personal identity, he instead argues that one could survive the destruction of all of one's psychological contents and capabilities as long as the human organism remains alive.

    • Nature

Silent Spring


Author: Rachel Carson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780618249060
Category: Nature
Page: 378
View: 3390
Discusses the reckless annihilation of fish and birds by the use of pesticides and warns of the possible genetic effects on humans.

    • Nature

Monster of God: The Man-Eating Predator in the Jungles of History and the Mind


Author: David Quammen
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393076301
Category: Nature
Page: 528
View: 3802
"Rich detail and vivid anecdotes of adventure....A treasure trove of exotic fact and hard thinking."—The New York Times Book Review, front page For millennia, lions, tigers, and their man-eating kin have kept our dark, scary forests dark and scary, and their predatory majesty has been the stuff of folklore. But by the year 2150 big predators may only exist on the other side of glass barriers and chain-link fences. Their gradual disappearance is changing the very nature of our existence. We no longer occupy an intermediate position on the food chain; instead we survey it invulnerably from above—so far above that we are in danger of forgetting that we even belong to an ecosystem. Casting his expert eye over the rapidly diminishing areas of wilderness where predators still reign, the award-winning author of The Song of the Dodo examines the fate of lions in India's Gir forest, of saltwater crocodiles in northern Australia, of brown bears in the mountains of Romania, and of Siberian tigers in the Russian Far East. In the poignant and troublesome ferocity of these embattled creatures, we recognize something primeval deep within us, something in danger of vanishing forever.

    • Science

On Human Nature


Author: Edward O. Wilson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674076559
Category: Science
Page: 284
View: 4760
In his new preface E. O. Wilson reflects on how he came to write this book: how The Insect Societies led him to write Sociobiology, and how the political and religious uproar that engulfed that book persuaded him to write another book that would better explain the relevance of biology to the understanding of human behavior.

    • History

Nonviolence

The History of a Dangerous Idea
Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 0307497100
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 8512
In this timely, highly original, and controversial narrative, New York Times bestselling author Mark Kurlansky discusses nonviolence as a distinct entity, a course of action, rather than a mere state of mind. Nonviolence can and should be a technique for overcoming social injustice and ending wars, he asserts, which is why it is the preferred method of those who speak truth to power. Nonviolence is a sweeping yet concise history that moves from ancient Hindu times to present-day conflicts raging in the Middle East and elsewhere. Kurlansky also brings into focus just why nonviolence is a “dangerous” idea, and asks such provocative questions as: Is there such a thing as a “just war”? Could nonviolence have worked against even the most evil regimes in history? Kurlansky draws from history twenty-five provocative lessons on the subject that we can use to effect change today. He shows how, time and again, violence is used to suppress nonviolence and its practitioners–Gandhi and Martin Luther King, for example; that the stated deterrence value of standing national armies and huge weapons arsenals is, at best, negligible; and, encouragingly, that much of the hard work necessary to begin a movement to end war is already complete. It simply needs to be embraced and accelerated. Engaging, scholarly, and brilliantly reasoned, Nonviolence is a work that compels readers to look at history in an entirely new way. This is not just a manifesto for our times but a trailblazing book whose time has come. From the Hardcover edition.

    • Science

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind
Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062316109
Category: Science
Page: 464
View: 5962
New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

    • Science

Coyote America

A Natural and Supernatural History
Author: Dan Flores
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465098533
Category: Science
Page: 288
View: 7827
Finalist for the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award "A masterly synthesis of scientific research and personal observation." -Wall Street Journal Legends don't come close to capturing the incredible story of the coyote In the face of centuries of campaigns of annihilation employing gases, helicopters, and engineered epidemics, coyotes didn't just survive, they thrived, expanding across the continent from Alaska to New York. In the war between humans and coyotes, coyotes have won, hands-down. Coyote America is the illuminating five-million-year biography of this extraordinary animal, from its origins to its apotheosis. It is one of the great epics of our time.

    • Psychology

The Age of Empathy

Nature's Lessons for a Kinder Society
Author: Frans de Waal
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 0307462528
Category: Psychology
Page: 304
View: 3786
In this thought-provoking book, the acclaimed author of Our Inner Ape examines how empathy comes naturally to a great variety of animals, including humans. Are we our brothers' keepers? Do we have an instinct for compassion? Or are we, as is often assumed, only on earth to serve our own survival and interests? By studying social behaviors in animals, such as bonding, the herd instinct, the forming of trusting alliances, expressions of consolation, and conflict resolution, Frans de Waal demonstrates that animals–and humans–are "preprogrammed to reach out." He has found that chimpanzees care for mates that are wounded by leopards, elephants offer "reassuring rumbles" to youngsters in distress, and dolphins support sick companions near the water's surface to prevent them from drowning. From day one humans have innate sensitivities to faces, bodies, and voices; we've been designed to feel for one another. De Waal's theory runs counter to the assumption that humans are inherently selfish, which can be seen in the fields of politics, law, and finance. But he cites the public's outrage at the U.S. government's lack of empathy in the wake of Hurricane Katrina as a significant shift in perspective–one that helped Barack Obama become elected and ushered in what may well become an Age of Empathy. Through a better understanding of empathy's survival value in evolution, de Waal suggests, we can work together toward a more just society based on a more generous and accurate view of human nature. Written in layman's prose with a wealth of anecdotes, wry humor, and incisive intelligence, The Age of Empathy is essential reading for our embattled times. "An important and timely message about the biological roots of human kindness." —Desmond Morris, author of The Naked Ape

    • Psychology

Dominance and Aggression in Humans and Other Animals

The Great Game of Life
Author: Henry R. Hermann
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 0128092955
Category: Psychology
Page: 396
View: 3228
Dominance and Aggression in Humans and Other Animals: The Great Game of Life examines human nature and the influence of evolution, genetics, chemistry, nurture, and the sociopolitical environment as a way of understanding how and why humans behave in aggressive and dominant ways. The book walks us through aggression in other social species, compares and contrasts human behavior to other animals, and then explores specific human behaviors like bullying, abuse, territoriality murder, and war. The book examines both individual and group aggression in different environments including work, school, and the home. It explores common stressors triggering aggressive behaviors, and how individual personalities can be vulnerable to, or resistant to, these stressors. The book closes with an exploration of the cumulative impact of human aggression and dominance on the natural world. Reviews the influence of evolution, genetics, biochemistry, and nurture on aggression Explores aggression in multiple species, including insects, fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals Compares human and animal aggressive and dominant behavior Examines bullying, abuse, territoriality, murder, and war Includes nonaggressive behavior in displays of respect and tolerance Highlights aggression triggers from drugs to stress Discusses individual and group behavior, including organizations and nations Probes dominance and aggression in religion and politics Translates the impact of human behavior over time on the natural world

    • History

On Combat

The Psychology and Physiology of Deadly Conflict in War and in Peace
Author: Dave Grossman,Loren W. Christensen
Publisher: Human Factor Research Group Incorporated
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 403
View: 6490
Looks at the effect of deadly battle on the body and mind and offers new research findings to help prevent lasting adverse effects.