• Business & Economics

The Rise of Women Farmers and Sustainable Agriculture


Author: Carolyn Sachs,Mary Barbercheck,Kathryn Braiser,Nancy Ellen Kiernan,Anna Rachel Terman
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609384156
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 196
View: 8851
A profound shift is occurring among women working in agriculture - they are increasingly seeing themselves as farmers, not only as the wives or daughters of farmers. In this book, farm women in the northeastern United States describe how they got into farming and became successful entrepreneurs despite the barriers they encountered in agricultural institutions, farming communities, and even their own families. The authors' feminist agrifood systems theory (FAST) values women's ways of knowing and working in agriculture and has the potential to shift how farmers, agricultural professionals, and anyone else interested in farming think about gender and sustainability, as well as to change how feminist scholars and theorists think about agriculture.--COVER.

    • Technology & Engineering

The Rise of Women Farmers and Sustainable Agriculture


Author: Carolyn Sachs,Mary Barbercheck,Kathryn Braiser,Nancy Ellen Kiernan,Anna Rachel Terman
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609384164
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 202
View: 6012
A profound shift is occurring among women working in agriculture—they are increasingly seeing themselves as farmers, not only as the wives or daughters of farmers. The authors draw on more than a decade of research to document and analyze the reasons for the transformation. As their sense of identity changes, many female farmers are challenging the sexism they face in their chosen profession. In this book, farm women in the northeastern United States describe how they got into farming and became successful entrepreneurs despite the barriers they encountered in agricultural institutions, farming communities, and even their own families. Their strategies for obtaining land and labor and developing successful businesses offer models for other aspiring farmers. Pulling down the barriers that women face requires organizations and institutions to become informed by what the authors call a feminist agrifood systems theory (FAST). This framework values women’s ways of knowing and working in agriculture: emphasizing personal, economic, and environmental sustainability, creating connections through the food system, and developing networks that emphasize collaboration and peer-to-peer education. The creation and growth of a specific organization, the Pennsylvania Women’s Agricultural Network, offers a blueprint for others seeking to incorporate a feminist agrifood systems approach into agricultural programming. The theory has the potential to shift how farmers, agricultural professionals, and anyone else interested in farming think about gender and sustainability, as well as to change how feminist scholars and theorists think about agriculture.

    • Social Science

Gendered Fields

Rural Women, Agriculture, And Environment
Author: Carolyn E Sachs
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429973438
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 3537

    • Social Science

Women in Agriculture

Professionalizing Rural Life in North America and Europe, 1880-1965
Author: Linda M. Ambrose,Joan M. Jensen
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609384725
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 7660
Taking readers into the rural hinterlands of the rapidly urbanizing societies of the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and the Netherlands, the essays in Women in Agriculture tell the stories of a cadre of professional women who worked as agricultural researchers, producers, marketers, educators, and community organizers, andacted to bridge the growing rift between those who grew food and those who only consumed it. "

    • Political Science

Cities of Farmers

Urban Agricultural Practices and Processes
Author: Julie C. Dawson,Alfonso Morales
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609384377
Category: Political Science
Page: 333
View: 1440
Full-scale food production in cities: is it an impossibility? Or is it a panacea for all that ails urban communities? Today, it s a reality, but many people still don t know how much of an impact this emerging food system is having on cities and their residents. This book showcases the work of the farmers, activists, urban planners, and city officials in the United States and Canada who are advancing food production. They have realized that, when it s done right, farming in cities can enhance the local ecology, foster cohesive communities, and improve the quality of life for urban residents. Cities of Farmersenables readers to understand and contribute to their local food system, whether they are raising vegetables in a community garden, setting up a farmers market, or formulating regulations for farming and composting within city limits."

    • Business & Economics

Making Local Food Work

The Challenges and Opportunities of Today's Small Farmers
Author: Brandi Janssen
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 160938492X
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 236
View: 7055
Making Local Food Work is an ideal introduction to what local food means today and what it might be tomorrow. By listening to and working alongside people trying to build a local food system in Iowa, Brandi Janssen uncovers the complex realities of making it work. She asks how Iowa's small farmers and CSA owners deal with farmers' market regulations, neighbors who spray pesticides on crops or lawns, and sanitary regulations on meat processing and milk production. How can they meet the needs of large buyers like school districts? Is local food production benefitting rural communities as much as advocates claim? In answering these questions, Janssen displays the pragmatism and level-headedness one would expect of the heartland, much like the farmers and processors profiled here. It's doable, she states, but we're going to have to do more than shop at our local farmers' market to make it happen.

    • Cooking

Farmer Jane

Women Changing the Way We Eat
Author: Temra Costa
Publisher: Gibbs Smith
ISBN: 1423605624
Category: Cooking
Page: 224
View: 2260
Farmer Jane profiles thirty women in the sustainable food industry, describing their agriculture and business models and illustrating the amazing changes they are making in how we connect with food. These advocates for creating a more holistic and nurturing food and agriculture system also answer questions on starting a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program, how to get involved in policy at local and national levels, and how to address the different types of renewable energy and finance them.

    • Business & Economics

Women in Agriculture Worldwide

Key issues and practical approaches
Author: Amber J. Fletcher,Wendee Kubik
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134774648
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 276
View: 9052
Over the past two decades, existing documentation of women in the agricultural sector has surveyed topics such as agricultural restructuring and land reform, international trade agreements and food trade, land ownership and rural development and rural feminisms. Many studies have focused on either the high-income countries of the global North or the low-income countries of the global South. This separation suggests that the North has little to learn from the South, or that there is little shared commonality across the global dividing line. Fletcher and Kubik cross this political, economic, and ideological division by drawing together authors from 5 continents. They discuss the situation for women in agriculture in 13 countries worldwide, with two chapters that cover international contexts. The authors blur the boundaries between academic and organizational authors and their contributors include university-based researchers, gender experts, development consultants, and staff of agricultural research centers and international organizations (i.e., Oxfam, the United Nations World Food Program). The common thread connecting these diverse authors is an emphasis on practical and concrete solutions to address the challenges, such as lack of access to resources and infrastructure, lack of household decision-making power, and gender biases in policymaking and leadership, still faced by women in agriculture around the world. Ongoing issues in climate change will exacerbate many of these issues and several chapters also address environment and sustainability. This book is of great interest to readers in the areas of gender studies, agriculture, policy studies, environmental studies, development and international studies.

    • Business & Economics

Soil Sisters

A Toolkit for Women Farmers
Author: Lisa Kivirist
Publisher: New Society Publishers
ISBN: 1550926020
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 256
View: 3288

    • Technology & Engineering

Crisis and Opportunity

Sustainability in American Agriculture
Author: John E. Ikerd
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803217447
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 342
View: 4104
With the decline of family farms and rural communities and the rise of corporate farming and the resulting environmental degradation, American agriculture is in crisis. But this crisis offers the opportunity to rethink agriculture in sustainable terms. Here one of the most eloquent and influential proponents of sustainable agriculture explains what this means. These engaging essays describe what sustainable agriculture is, why it began, and how it can succeed. Together they constitute a clear and compelling vision for rebalancing the ecological, economic, and social dimensions of agriculture to meet the needs of the present without compromising the future. In Crisis and Opportunity, John E. Ikerd outlines the consequences of agricultural industrialization, then details the methods that can restore economic viability, ecological soundness, and social responsibility to our agricultural system and thus ensure sustainable agriculture as the foundation of a sustainable food system and a sustainable society.

    • History

Mama Learned Us to Work

Farm Women in the New South
Author: Lu Ann Jones
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 080786207X
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 7160
Farm women of the twentieth-century South have been portrayed as oppressed, worn out, and isolated. Lu Ann Jones tells quite a different story in Mama Learned Us to Work. Building upon evocative oral histories, she encourages us to understand these women as consumers, producers, and agents of economic and cultural change. As consumers, farm women bargained with peddlers at their backdoors. A key business for many farm women was the "butter and egg trade--small-scale dairying and raising chickens. Their earnings provided a crucial margin of economic safety for many families during the 1920s and 1930s and offered women some independence from their men folks. These innovative women showed that poultry production paid off and laid the foundation for the agribusiness poultry industry that emerged after World War II. Jones also examines the relationships between farm women and home demonstration agents and the effect of government-sponsored rural reform. She discusses the professional culture that developed among white agents as they reconciled new and old ideas about women's roles and shows that black agents, despite prejudice, linked their clients to valuable government resources and gave new meanings to traditions of self-help, mutual aid, and racial uplift.

    • History

Broken Heartland

The Rise of America's Rural Ghetto
Author: Osha Gray Davidson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 220
View: 9628
Between 1940 and the mid 1980s, farm production expenses in America's Heartland tripled, capital purchases quadrupled, interest payments jumped tenfold, profits fell by 10 percent, the number of farmers decreased by two-thirds, and nearly every farming community lost population, businesses, and economic stability. Growth for these desperate communities has come to mean low-paying part-time jobs, expensive tax concessions, waste dumps, and industrial hog farming, all of which come with environmental and psychological price tags. In Broken Heartland, Osha Gray Davidson chronicles the decline of the Heartland and its transformation into a bitterly divided and isolated regional ghetto. Through interviews with more than two hundred farmers, social workers, government officials, and scholars, he puts a human face on the farm crisis of the 1980s. In this expanded edition Davidson emphasizes the tenacious power of far-right-wing groups; his chapter on these burgeoning rural organizations in the original edition of Broken Heartland was the first in-depth look—six years before of the Oklahoma City bombing—at the politics of hate they nurture. He also spotlights NAFTA, hog lots, sustainable agriculture, and the other battles and changes over the past six years in rural America.

    • Social Science

Elite Women and the Agricultural Landscape, 1700–1830


Author: Briony McDonagh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317145119
Category: Social Science
Page: 190
View: 1299
Social and economic histories of the long eighteenth century have largely ignored women as a class of landowners and improvers. 1700 to 1830 was a period in which the landscape of large swathes of the English Midlands was reshaped – both materially and imaginatively – by parliamentary enclosure and a bundle of other new practices. Outside the Midlands too, local landscapes were remodelled in line with the improving ideals of the era. Yet while we know a great deal about the men who pushed forward schemes for enclosure and sponsored agricultural improvement, far less is known about the role played by female landowners and farmers and their contributions to landscape change. Drawing on examples from across Georgian England, Elite Women and the Agricultural Landscape, 1700–1830 offers a detailed study of elite women’s relationships with landed property, specifically as they were mediated through the lens of their estate management and improvement. This highly original book provides an explicitly feminist historical geography of the eighteenth-century English rural landscape. It addresses important questions about propertied women’s role in English rural communities and in Georgian society more generally, whilst contributing to wider cultural debates about women’s place in the environmental, social and economic history of Britain. It will be of interest to those working in Historical and Cultural Geography, Social, Economic and Cultural History, Women’s Studies, Gender Studies and Landscape Studies.

    • Business & Economics

Good Apples

Behind Every Bite
Author: Susan Futrell
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609384822
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 268
View: 7327
Apples are so ordinary and so ubiquitous that we often take them for granted. Yet it is surprisingly challenging to grow and sell such a common fruit. In fact, producing diverse, tasty apples for the market requires almost as much ingenuity and interdependence as building and maintaining a vibrant democracy. Understanding the geographic, ecological, and economic forces shaping the choices of apple growers, apple pickers, and apple buyers illuminates what’s at stake in the way we organize our food system. Good Apples is for anyone who wants to go beyond the kitchen and backyard into the orchards, packing sheds, and cold storage rooms; into the laboratories and experiment stations; and into the warehouses, stockrooms, and marketing meetings, to better understand how we as citizens and eaters can sustain the farms that provide food for our communities. Susan Futrell has spent years working in sustainable food distribution, including more than a decade with apple growers. She shows us why sustaining family orchards, like family farms, may be essential to the soul of our nation.

    • Social Science

Food and the City

Urban Agriculture and the New Food Revolution
Author: Jennifer Cockrall-King
Publisher: Prometheus Books
ISBN: 1616144599
Category: Social Science
Page: 372
View: 2060
A global movement to take back our food is growing. The future of farming is in our hands—and in our cities. This book examines alternative food systems in cities around the globe that are shortening their food chains, growing food within their city limits, and taking their "food security" into their own hands. The author, an award-winning food journalist, sought out leaders in the urban-agriculture movement and visited cities successfully dealing with "food deserts." What she found was not just a niche concern of activists but a global movement that cuts across the private and public spheres, economic classes, and cultures. She describes a global movement happening from London and Paris to Vancouver and New York to establish alternatives to the monolithic globally integrated supermarket model. A cadre of forward-looking, innovative people has created growing spaces in cities: on rooftops, backyards, vacant lots, along roadways, and even in "vertical farms." Whether it’s a community public orchard supplying the needs of local residents or an urban farm that has reclaimed a derelict inner city lot to grow and sell premium market veggies to restaurant chefs, the urban food revolution is clearly underway and working. This book is an exciting, fascinating chronicle of a game-changing movement, a rebellion against the industrial food behemoth, and a reclaiming of communities to grow, distribute, and eat locally. From the Trade Paperback edition.

    • Law

Knowing Where It Comes From

Labeling Traditional Foods to Compete in a Global Market
Author: Fabio Parasecoli
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1609385349
Category: Law
Page: 274
View: 3235
Offering the first broadly comparative analysis of place-based labeling and marketing systems, Knowing Where It Comes From examines the way claims about the origins and meanings of traditional foods get made around the world, from Italy and France to Costa Rica and Thailand. It also highlights the implications of different systems for both producers and consumers. Labeling regimes have moved beyond intellectual property to embrace community-based protections, intangible cultural heritage, cultural landscapes, and indigenous knowledge. Reflecting a rich array of juridical, regulatory, and activist perspectives, these approaches seek to level the playing field on which food producers and consumers interact.

    • Technology & Engineering

Urban Farming

Sustainable City Living in Your Backyard, in Your Community, and in the World
Author: Thomas Fox
Publisher: i5 Publishing
ISBN: 1935484834
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 416
View: 9980
It doesn’t take a farm to have the heart of a farmer. Now, due to a burgeoning sustainable-living movement, you don’t have to own acreage to fulfill your dream of raising your own food. Hobby Farms Urban Farming, from Hobby Farm Press and the same people who bring you Hobby Farms and Hobby Farm Home magazine, will walk every city and suburban dweller down the path of self sustainability. Urban Farming will introduce readers to the concepts of gardening and farming from a high-rise apartment, participating in a community garden, vertical farming, and converting terraces and other small city spaces into fruitful, vegetableful real estate. This comprehensive volume will answer every up and coming urban farmer’s questions about how, what, where and why—a new green book for the dedicated citizen seeking to reduce his carbon footprint and grocery bill.

    • Technology & Engineering

The Emergent Agriculture

Farming, Sustainability and the Return of the Local Economy
Author: Gary Kleppel
Publisher: New Society Publishers
ISBN: 1550925776
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 192
View: 4845
Local, diverse and resilient – the new culture of food

    • History

Neanderthals, Bandits and Farmers

How Agriculture Really Began
Author: Colin Tudge
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300080247
Category: History
Page: 53
View: 2673
Tradition has it that agriculture began in the Middle East around 10,000 years ago, that once people realized the advantages of farming, it spread rapidly to the furthest outposts of the world, and that this led to the Neolithic Revolution and the end of the hunting-gathering lifestyle. In this book Colin Tudge argues that agriculture in some form was in the repertoire of our ancestors for thousands of years before the Neolithic farming revolution: people did not suddenly invent forced into it over a long period. What we see in the Neolithic Revolution is not the beginning of agriculture on a large scale, in one place, with refined tools. Drawing on a wide range of evidence from fossil records to the Bible, Tudge offers a persuasive hypothesis about a puzzling epoch in our past. In so doing, he provides new insights into the Pleistocene overkill, the demise of the Neanderthals, the location of the biblical Eden, and much more.

    • Rural women

Women and the Land


Author: Barbara Hall
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781888160963
Category: Rural women
Page: 96
View: 3990
"Women and the Land takes a look at more than twenty-five women who are impacting Iowa's farmland. Some of them have inherited rural property and are managing the agriculture practices from afar. Some are working the land directly, providing food to the heartland. Some are working in tandem with their husbands, fathers, sisters, daughters. Many of them grew up on a farm, left the land to get an education and left the state to follow their passions, only to find that their deepest passion is really the land, and have returned to it. Each of the women is affecting the land in her own unique and feminine way" -- Amazon.com