• History

Bonapartists in the Borderlands

French Exiles and Refugees on the Gulf Coast, 1815-1835
Author: Rafe Blaufarb
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817314873
Category: History
Page: 302
View: 2019
Bonapartists in the Borderlands discusses the ill-fated Vine and Olive Colony within the context of America's westward expansion and the French Revolution.

    • American literature

The United States Catalog

Supplement
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American literature
Page: N.A
View: 1599


    • American literature

The United States Catalog

Books in Print, 1902 : Entries Under Author, Subject, and Title in One Alphabet .... supplement
Author: Marion Effie Potter
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American literature
Page: N.A
View: 6941

    • History

The Road to Louisiana

The Saint-Domingue Refugees 1792-1809
Author: Carl A. Brasseaux,Glenn R. Conrad
Publisher: University of Louisiana
ISBN: 9781935754602
Category: History
Page: 326
View: 3255
This anthology constitutes the first attempt to fill comprehensively one of the most enduring lacunae in Louisiana historiography--the French-Antillian migration to the lower Mississippi Valley. Generations of Louisiana historians have neglected this influx, involving more than 10,000 Saint-Domingue refugees between 1792 and 1810. These newcomers were subsequently joined by far smaller numbers of French citizens from Guadeloupe and Martinique. Not only were these immigrants largely responsible for the establishment and success of the state's sugar industry, but they also gave New Orleans many of its most notable early institutions--the French opera, newspapers, schools, and colleges--and ultimately its antebellum French flavor. The refugees also contributed Creole cuisine, Creole language, okra, and voodoo to their adopted homeland. Despite their significance, the refugees have attracted remarkably little scholarly attention. Louisiana's pioneer historians--FranCois Xavier Martin, Charles E. A. GayarrE, and AlcEe Fortier--and their successors have generally accorded them only passing mention. The articles assembled in this anthology are the first to document the migrations and resettlement of these unfortunate people and to assess their impact upon New Orleans. Three of the four articles have appeared earlier in various scholarly journals, some of which are now defunct. Two of the articles have been translated from the original French by David Cheramie to make them accessible to English-speaking historians and genealogists, who had previously been unable to extract and utilize the wealth of information presented by the authors. The authors, widely recognized for their lasting contributions to the field of Saint-Domingue studies, trace the refugees' long, hard road to Louisiana. Thomas Fiehrer, an expert on the French Antilles, provides an overview of Louisiana's historical Caribbean connection. Gabriel Debien, dean of the French-Antillian historians, investigates the temporary relocation of the Saint-Domingue refugees in Cuba (1793-1815). Debien and the late New Orleans historian and genealogist RenE LeGardeur recount the small-scale migration of refugees into southern Louisiana preceding the massive, early nineteenth-century influx, analyzed by noted Canadian historian Paul Lachance. Finally, the editors' introduction puts the foregoing essays into historical perspective and examines the impact of the refugees on Louisiana's rural parishes.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Freedom Papers


Author: Rebecca J. Scott,Jean M Hébrard
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674065166
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 474
This saga opens with the enslavement of a woman from Senegambia, and then traces her family’s quest, across five generations, for lives of dignity and equality. The story of Rosalie and her descendants unfolds against the background of three great antiracist struggles: the Haitian Revolution, the French Revolution of 1848, and the U.S. Civil War.


    • History

From Subject to Citizen

The Second Empire and the Emergence of Modern French Democracy
Author: Sudhir Hazareesingh
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400864747
Category: History
Page: 410
View: 2357
From Subject to Citizen offers an original account of the Second Empire (1852-1870) as a turning point in modern French political culture: a period in which thinkers of all political persuasions combined forces to create the participatory democracy alive in France today. Here Sudhir Hazareesingh probes beyond well-known features of the Second Empire, its centralized government and authoritarianism, and reveals the political, social, and cultural advances that enabled publicists to engage an increasingly educated public on issues of political order and good citizenship. He portrays the 1860s in particular as a remarkably intellectual decade during which Bonapartists, legitimists, liberals, and republicans applied their ideologies to the pressing problem of decentralization. Ideals such as communal freedom and civic cohesion rapidly assumed concrete and lasting meaning for many French people as their country entered the age of nationalism. With the restoration of universal suffrage for men in 1851, constitutionalist political ideas and values could no longer be expressed within the narrow confines of the Parisian elite. Tracing these ideas through the books, pamphlets, articles, speeches, and memoirs of the period, Hazareesingh examines a discourse that connects the central state and local political life. In a striking reappraisal of the historical roots of current French democracy, he ultimately shows how the French constructed an ideal of citizenship that was "local in form but national in substance." Originally published in 1998. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    • History

The Perfidy of Albion

French Perceptions of England during the French Revolution
Author: N. Hampson
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230389694
Category: History
Page: 181
View: 4459
Hampson describes how the French Revolution, which seemed to promise an era of Franco-British partnership, led to an even more bitter estrangement between the two nations. Both the British and French peoples saw the revolution of 1789 as offering the prospect of a new Franco-British partnership. These hopes soon foundered on old suspicions and new ideological divergences. The result was to confirm the traditional perception of each nation's own identity, centred on the state in France and the people in Great Britain.

    • Social Science

Illegal Migration and Gender in a Global and Historical Perspective


Author: Marlou Schrover
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
ISBN: 9089640479
Category: Social Science
Page: 191
View: 6825
This incisive study combines the two subjects and views the migration scholarship through the lens of the gender perspective.

    • Computers

Enlightenment Portraits


Author: Michel Vovelle
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226865706
Category: Computers
Page: 456
View: 4834
A subtle and complex study of the Enlightenment, this book allows us to reflect on how nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholars have constructed our views on eighteenth-century people.

    • History

The Impact of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World


Author: David Patrick Geggus
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 9781570034169
Category: History
Page: 261
View: 6107
Sharing attention with such tumultuous events as the French Revolution and the Napoleonic War, Haiti's fifteen-year struggle for racial equality, slave emancipation, and colonial independence challenged notions about racial hierarchy that were gaining legitimacy in an Atlantic world dominated by Europeans and the slave trade. The Impact of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World explores the multifarious influence -- from economic to ideological to psychological -

    • Social Science

Gender, migration and categorisation

making distinctions between migrants in Western Countries, 1945-2010
Author: Marlou Schrover,Deirdre M. Moloney
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
ISBN: 9048521750
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 6324
All people are equal, according to Thomas Jefferson, but all migrants are not. This volume looks at how they are distinguished in France, the United States, Turkey, Canada, Mexico, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Denmark made through history between migrants and how these were justified in policies and public debates. The chapters form a triptych, addressing in three clusters the problematization of questions such as 'who is a refugee', 'who is family' and 'what is difference'. The chapters in this volume show that these are not separate issues. They intersect in ways that vary according to countries of origin and settlement, economic climate, geopolitical situation, as well as by gender, and by class, ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation of the migrants.



    • Social Science

Facing Racial Revolution

Eyewitness Accounts of the Haitian Insurrection
Author: Jeremy D. Popkin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226675858
Category: Social Science
Page: 416
View: 8837
The only truly successful slave uprising in the Atlantic world, the Haitian Revolution gave birth to the first independent black republic of the modern era. Inspired by the revolution that had recently roiled their French rulers, black slaves and people of mixed race alike rose up against their oppressors in a bloody insurrection that led to the burning of the colony’s largest city, a bitter struggle against Napoleon’s troops, and in 1804, the founding of a free nation. Numerous firsthand narratives of these events survived, but their invaluable insights into the period have long languished in obscurity—until now. In Facing Racial Revolution, Jeremy D. Popkin unearths these documents and presents excerpts from more than a dozen accounts written by white colonists trying to come to grips with a world that had suddenly disintegrated. These dramatic writings give us our most direct portrayal of the actions of the revolutionaries, vividly depicting encounters with the uprising’s leaders—Toussaint Louverture, Boukman, and Jean-Jacques Dessalines—as well as putting faces on many of the anonymous participants in this epochal moment. Popkin’s expert commentary on each selection provides the necessary background about the authors and the incidents they describe, while also addressing the complex question of the witnesses’ reliability and urging the reader to consider the implications of the narrators’ perspectives. Along with the American and French revolutions, the birth of Haiti helped shape the modern world. The powerful, moving, and sometimes troubling testimonies collected in Facing Racial Revolution significantly expand our understanding of this momentous event.



    • Berkeley County (S.C.)

Ravenel Records

A History and Genealogy of the Huguenot Family of Ravenel, of South Carolina; with Some Incidental Account of the Parish of St. Johns Berkeley, which was Their Principal Location. The Book is Intended for Private Distribution
Author: Henry Edmund Ravenel
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Berkeley County (S.C.)
Page: 279
View: 3928