• History

The Times of Their Lives

Life, Love, and Death in Plymouth Colony
Author: James Deetz,Patricia E. Scott Deetz
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0385721536
Category: History
Page: 367
View: 2868
Offers an honest, often startling portrait of Plymouth Colony, including the legal system, religion, agriculture, family life, women's roles, alcohol use, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, suspicious deaths, and violent crimes. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.

    • History

A Little Commonwealth

Family Life in Plymouth Colony
Author: John Demos
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199725969
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 3087
The year 2000 marks the thirtieth anniversary of the publication of A Little Commonwealth by Bancroft Prize-winning scholar John Demos. This groundbreaking study examines the family in the context of the colony founded by the Pilgrims who came over on the Mayflower. Basing his work on physical artifacts, wills, estate inventories, and a variety of legal and official enactments, Demos portrays the family as a structure of roles and relationships, emphasizing those of husband and wife, parent and child, and master and servant. The book's most startling insights come from a reconsideration of commonly-held views of American Puritans and of the ways in which they dealt with one another. Demos concludes that Puritan "repression" was not as strongly directed against sexuality as against the expression of hostile and aggressive impulses, and he shows how this pattern reflected prevalent modes of family life and child-rearing. The result is an in-depth study of the ordinary life of a colonial community, located in the broader environment of seventeenth-century America. Demos has provided a new foreword and a list of further reading for this second edition, which will offer a new generation of readers access to this classic study.

    • History

In Small Things Forgotten

An Archaeology of Early American Life
Author: James Deetz
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0307874389
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 9034
History is recorded in many ways. According to author James Deetz, the past can be seen most fully by studying the small things so often forgotten. Objects such as doorways, gravestones, musical instruments, and even shards of pottery fill in the cracks between large historical events and depict the intricacies of daily life. In his completely revised and expanded edition of In Small Things Forgotten, Deetz has added new sections that more fully acknowledge the presence of women and African Americans in Colonial America. New interpretations of archaeological finds detail how minorities influenced and were affected by the development of the Anglo-American tradition in the years following the settlers' arrival in Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1620. Among Deetz's observations: Subtle changes in building long before the Revolutionary War hinted at the growing independence of the American colonies and their desire to be less like the British. Records of estate auctions show that many households in Colonial America contained only one chair--underscoring the patriarchal nature of the early American family. All other members of the household sat on stools or the floor. The excavation of a tiny community of freed slaves in Massachusetts reveals evidence of the transplantation of African culture to North America. Simultaneously a study of American life and an explanation of how American life is studied, In Small Things Forgotten, through the everyday details of ordinary living, colorfully depicts a world hundreds of years in the past. From the Trade Paperback edition.

    • History

Thanksgiving

The Pilgrims' First Year in America
Author: Glenn Alan Cheney
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780985628444
Category: History
Page: 329
View: 2121
This is not a book about a holiday. It's about people and what happened to them in their first year at Plymouth. A comprehensive prologue details why they left Europe, and two chapters provide information about the native people who helped the Pilgrims.

    • Social Science

Slavery in the Age of Reason

Archaeology at a New England Farm
Author: Alexandra A. Chan
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572335653
Category: Social Science
Page: 284
View: 5915
"Using traditional archaeological techniques and analysis, as well as theoretical perspectives and representational styles of post-processualist schools of thought, Slavery in the Age of Reason is an innovative volume that portrays the Royall family and the people they enslaved "from the inside out." It should put to rest any lingering myth that the peculiar institution was any less harsh or complex when found in the North." From the bookjacket.

    • History

A People's Army

Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years' War
Author: Fred Anderson
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807838284
Category: History
Page: 292
View: 2917
A People's Army documents the many distinctions between British regulars and Massachusetts provincial troops during the Seven Years' War. Originally published by UNC Press in 1984, the book was the first investigation of colonial military life to give equal attention to official records and to the diaries and other writings of the common soldier. The provincials' own accounts of their experiences in the campaign amplify statistical profiles that define the men, both as civilians and as soldiers. These writings reveal in intimate detail their misadventures, the drudgery of soldiering, the imminence of death, and the providential world view that helped reconcile them to their condition and to the war.

    • Religion

Dissenting Bodies

Corporealities in Early New England
Author: Martha L. Finch
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231511388
Category: Religion
Page: 296
View: 4240
For the Puritan separatists of seventeenth-century New England, "godliness," as manifested by the body, was the sign of election, and the body, with its material demands and metaphorical significance, became the axis upon which all colonial activity and religious meaning turned. Drawing on literature, documents, and critical studies of embodiment as practiced in the New England colonies, Martha L. Finch launches a fascinating investigation into the scientific, theological, and cultural conceptions of corporeality at a pivotal moment in Anglo-Protestant history. Not only were settlers forced to interact bodily with native populations and other "new world" communities, they also fought starvation and illness; were whipped, branded, hanged, and murdered; sang, prayed, and preached; engaged in sexual relations; and were baptized according to their faith. All these activities shaped the colonists' understanding of their existence and the godly principles of their young society. Finch focuses specifically on Plymouth Colony and those who endeavored to make visible what they believed to be God's divine will. Quakers, Indians, and others challenged these beliefs, and the constant struggle to survive, build cohesive communities, and regulate behavior forced further adjustments. Merging theological, medical, and other positions on corporeality with testimonies on colonial life, Finch brilliantly complicates our encounter with early Puritan New England.

    • History

Children in Colonial America


Author: James Alan Marten
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814757162
Category: History
Page: 253
View: 7016
With the recent explosion of high-profile court cases and staggering jury awards, America's justice system has moved to the forefront of our nation's consciousness. Yet while the average citizen is bombarded with information about a few sensational cases--such as the multi-million dollar damages awarded a woman who burned herself with McDonald's coffee-- most Americans are unaware of the truly dramatic transformation our courts and judicial system have undergone over the past three decades, and of the need to reform the system to adapt to that transformation. In Reforming the Civil Justice System, Larry Kramer has compiled a work that charts these revolutionary changes and offers solutions to the problems they present. Organized into three parts, the book investigates such topics as settlement incentives and joint tortfeasors, substance and form in the treatment of scientific evidence after Daubert v. Merrell Dow, and guiding jurors in valuing pain and suffering damages. Reforming the Civil Justice System offers feasible solutions that can realistically be adopted as our civil justice system continues to be refined and improved.

    • History

Enduring Conquests

Rethinking the Archaeology of Resistance to Spanish Colonialism in the Americas
Author: Matthew Liebmann,Melissa Scott Murphy
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 9781934691410
Category: History
Page: 325
View: 8265

    • History

Children in Colonial America


Author: James Marten
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814757154
Category: History
Page: 253
View: 8643
With the recent explosion of high-profile court cases and staggering jury awards, America's justice system has moved to the forefront of our nation's consciousness. Yet while the average citizen is bombarded with information about a few sensational cases--such as the multi-million dollar damages awarded a woman who burned herself with McDonald's coffee-- most Americans are unaware of the truly dramatic transformation our courts and judicial system have undergone over the past three decades, and of the need to reform the system to adapt to that transformation. In Reforming the Civil Justice System, Larry Kramer has compiled a work that charts these revolutionary changes and offers solutions to the problems they present. Organized into three parts, the book investigates such topics as settlement incentives and joint tortfeasors, substance and form in the treatment of scientific evidence after Daubert v. Merrell Dow, and guiding jurors in valuing pain and suffering damages. Reforming the Civil Justice System offers feasible solutions that can realistically be adopted as our civil justice system continues to be refined and improved.

    • History

Seasons of Misery

Catastrophe and Colonial Settlement in Early America
Author: Kathleen Donegan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812245407
Category: History
Page: 260
View: 7137
Seasons of Misery offers a boldly original account of early English settlement in American by placing catastrophe and crisis at the center of the story. Donegan argues that the constant state of suffering and uncertainty decisively formed the colonial identity and produced the first distinctly colonial literature.

    • Biography & Autobiography

Mayflower Bastard

A Stranger Among the Pilgrims
Author: David Lindsay
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9781429976992
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 272
View: 1108
David Lindsay, researching old records to learn details of the life of his ancestor, Richard More, soon found himself in the position of the Sorcerer's Apprentice-wherever he looked for one item, ten more appeared. What he found illuminated not only More's own life but painted a clear and satisfying picture of the way the First Comers, Saints and Strangers alike, set off for the new land, suffered the voyage on the Mayflower, and put down their roots to thrive on our continent's northeastern shore. From the story, Richard emerges as a man of questionable morals, much enterprise, and a good deal of old-fashioned pluck, a combination that could get him into trouble-and often did. He lived to father several children, to see, near the end of his life, a friend executed as a witch in Salem, and to be read out of the church for unseemly behavior. Mayflower Bastard lets readers see history in a new light by turning an important episode into a personal experience.

    • History

Witchcraft Myths in American Culture


Author: Marion Gibson
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0415979781
Category: History
Page: 293
View: 7488
A fascinating examination of how Americans think about and write about witches, from the 'real' witches tried and sometimes executed in early New England to modern re-imaginings of witches as pagan priestesses, comic-strip heroines and feminist icons. The first half of the book is a thorough re-reading of the original documents describing witchcraft prosecutions from 1640-1700 and a re-thinking of these sources as far less coherent and trustworthy than most historians have considered them to be. The second half of the book examines how these historical narratives have transformed into myths of witchcraft still current in American society, writing and visual culture. The discussion includes references to everything from Increase Mather and Edgar Allan Poe to Joss Whedon (the writer/director of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which includes a Wiccan character) and The Blair Witch Project.

    • Massachusetts

The Adventurous Life of Myles Standish and the Amazing-but-true Survival Story of Plymouth Colony

Barbary Pirates, the Mayflower, the First Thanksgiving, and Much, Much More
Author: Cheryl Harness
Publisher: Paw Prints
ISBN: 9781442029286
Category: Massachusetts
Page: 144
View: 2022
Brings to life the experiences of the Pilgrims and their military advisor, Myles Standish, in America, describing the people they met, the hardships they overcame, and the many successes they achieved.

    • Juvenile Fiction

N.C. Wyeth's Pilgrims


Author: Robert D. San Souci,N. C. Wyeth
Publisher: Chronicle Books
ISBN: 0811814866
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 40
View: 8343
Recounts the coming of the Pilgrims to America, with illustrations by N.C. Wyeth.

    • Religion

The First Thanksgiving

What the Real Story Tells Us About Loving God and Learning from History
Author: Robert Tracy McKenzie
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830895663
Category: Religion
Page: 235
View: 943
ForeWord 2013 Book of the Year Award Finalist (Adult Nonfiction, History) The Pilgrims' celebration of the first Thanksgiving is a keystone of America's national and spiritual identity. But is what we've been taught about them or their harvest feast what actually happened? And if not, what difference does it make? Through the captivating story of the birth of this quintessentially American holiday, veteran historian Tracy McKenzie helps us to better understand the tale of America's origins—and for Christians, to grasp the significance of this story and those like it. McKenzie avoids both idolizing and demonizing the Pilgrims, and calls us to love and learn from our flawed yet fascinating forebears. The First Thanksgiving is narrative history at its best, and promises to be an indispensable guide to the interplay of historical thinking and Christian reflection on the meaning of the past for the present.

    • History

Mourt's Relation

A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth
Author: Dwight B. Heath
Publisher: Applewood Books
ISBN: 0918222842
Category: History
Page: 96
View: 8386
Presents an account, first published in 1622, of the Pilgrim's journey to the new world.

    • Fiction

The God of Small Things

A Novel
Author: Arundhati Roy
Publisher: Vintage Canada
ISBN: 030737467X
Category: Fiction
Page: 336
View: 6563
The beloved debut novel about an affluent Indian family forever changed by one fateful day in 1969, from the author of The Ministry of Utmost Happiness NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • MAN BOOKER PRIZE WINNER Compared favorably to the works of Faulkner and Dickens, Arundhati Roy’s modern classic is equal parts powerful family saga, forbidden love story, and piercing political drama. The seven-year-old twins Estha and Rahel see their world shaken irrevocably by the arrival of their beautiful young cousin, Sophie. It is an event that will lead to an illicit liaison and tragedies accidental and intentional, exposing “big things [that] lurk unsaid” in a country drifting dangerously toward unrest. Lush, lyrical, and unnerving, The God of Small Things is an award-winning landmark that started for its author an esteemed career of fiction and political commentary that continues unabated.

    • Juvenile Nonfiction

The Voyage of the Mayflower


Author: Allison Lassieur
Publisher: Capstone
ISBN: 0736862110
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 32
View: 7046
"In graphic novel format, tells the story of the colonists who traveled to North America in 1620 on the Mayflower, their reasons for coming, and how they started Plymouth Colony"--Provided by publisher.

    • History

Clearing Land

Legacies of the American Farm
Author: Jane Brox
Publisher: North Point Press
ISBN: 1466807296
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 3000
Though few of us now live close to the soil, the world we inhabit has been sculpted by our long national saga of settlement. At the heart of our identity lies the notion of the family farm, as shaped by European history and reshaped by the vast opportunities of the continent. It lies at the heart of Jane Brox's personal story, too: she is the daughter of immigrant New England farmers whose way of life she memorialized in her first two books but has not carried on. In this clear-eyed, lyrical account, Brox twines the two narratives, personal and historical, to explore the place of the family farm as it has evolved from the pilgrims' brutal progress at Plymouth to the modern world, where much of our food is produced by industrial agriculture while the small farm is both marginalized and romanticized. In considering the place of the farm, Brox also considers the rise of textile cities in America, which encroached not only upon farms and farmers but upon the sense of commonality that once sustained them; and she traces the transformation of the idea of wilderness--and its intricate connection to cultivation--which changed as our ties to the land loosened, as terror of the wild was replaced by desire for it. Exploring these strands with neither judgment nor sentimentality, Brox arrives at something beyond a biography of the farm: a vivid depiction of the half-life it carries on in our collective imagination.