• Science

The Two-Mile Time Machine

Ice Cores, Abrupt Climate Change, and Our Future
Author: Richard B. Alley
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400852242
Category: Science
Page: 248
View: 9835
In the 1990s Richard B. Alley and his colleagues made headlines with the discovery that the last ice age came to an abrupt end over a period of only three years. In The Two-Mile Time Machine, Alley tells the fascinating history of global climate changes as revealed by reading the annual rings of ice from cores drilled in Greenland. He explains that humans have experienced an unusually temperate climate compared to the wild fluctuations that characterized most of prehistory. He warns that our comfortable environment could come to an end in a matter of years and tells us what we need to know in order to understand and perhaps overcome climate changes in the future. In a new preface, the author weighs in on whether our understanding of global climate change has altered in the years since the book was first published, what the latest research tells us, and what he is working on next.

    • Religion

Dictionary of Christianity and Science

The Definitive Reference for the Intersection of Christian Faith and Contemporary Science
Author: N.A
Publisher: Zondervan
ISBN: 0310496063
Category: Religion
Page: 704
View: 8228
The Dictionary of Christianity and Science provides, in one volume, entries on over 450 key terms, theories, individuals, movements, and debates at the intersection of Christian faith and contemporary science. In addition, because certain topics such as the age of the Earth and the historicity of Adam and Eve provoke disagreement among Christians, the dictionary includes “Counterpoints”-like essays that advocate for the views most commonly held among evangelicals. Representatives of leading perspectives present their arguments vigorously but respectfully in these advocacy essays, allowing readers to compare options and draw their own conclusions. The dictionary is also fully cross-referenced and entries include references and recommendation for further reading. Edited by Paul Copan, Tremper Longman III, Christopher L. Reese, and Michael G. Strauss, the Dictionary of Christianity and Science features a top-notch lineup of over 140 contributors in the fields of biblical studies, theology, philosophy, history, and various sciences. A unique reference work, it will be useful for scholars, pastors, students, and any Christian wanting to better understand the most relevant issues and ideas at the intersection of Christian faith and science.

    • Science

Earth Under Fire

How Global Warming is Changing the World
Author: Gary Braasch
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520260252
Category: Science
Page: 267
View: 1163
Presents an illustrated guide to the effects of climate change and how to lessen the effects of the dependence on fossil fuels.

    • Science

Brave New Arctic

The Untold Story of the Melting North
Author: Mark C. Serreze
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 140089025X
Category: Science
Page: 264
View: 400
An insider account of how researchers unraveled the mystery of the thawing Arctic In the 1990s, researchers in the Arctic noticed that floating summer sea ice had begun receding. This was accompanied by shifts in ocean circulation and unexpected changes in weather patterns throughout the world. The Arctic's perennially frozen ground, known as permafrost, was warming, and treeless tundra was being overtaken by shrubs. What was going on? Brave New Arctic is Mark Serreze's riveting firsthand account of how scientists from around the globe came together to find answers. In a sweeping tale of discovery spanning three decades, Serreze describes how puzzlement turned to concern and astonishment as researchers came to understand that the Arctic of old was quickly disappearing--with potentially devastating implications for the entire planet. Serreze is a world-renowned Arctic geographer and climatologist who has conducted fieldwork on ice caps, glaciers, sea ice, and tundra in the Canadian and Alaskan Arctic. In this must-read book, he blends invaluable insights from his own career with those of other pioneering scientists who, together, ushered in an exciting new age of Arctic exploration. Along the way, he accessibly describes the cutting-edge science that led to the alarming conclusion that the Arctic is rapidly thawing due to climate change, that humans are to blame, and that the global consequences are immense. A gripping scientific adventure story, Brave New Arctic shows how the Arctic's extraordinary transformation serves as a harbinger of things to come if we fail to meet the challenge posed by a warming Earth.

    • History

The Future History of the Arctic


Author: Charles Emmerson
Publisher: Public Affairs
ISBN: 1586486365
Category: History
Page: 405
View: 2894
"[The author] leads readers ... through the landscape, history, literature and politics of the North, from the wrongheaded theories of the ancients to diplomatic intrigues on the Arctic's borderlands, the brutality of the Soviet gulag archipelago, and the region's emergence as a strategically important source of energy."--Jacket p. [2].

    • Social Science

Dark Age America

Climate Change, Cultural Collapse, and the Hard Future Ahead
Author: John Michael Greer
Publisher: New Society Publishers
ISBN: 1550926284
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 977
After decades of missed opportunities, the door to a sustainable future has closed, and the future we face now is one in which today’s industrial civilization unravels in the face of uncontrolled climate change and resource depletion. The questions we need to ask now focus on what comes next. This book provides a hard but hopeful look at the answer

    • Science

Geoscience Data and Collections

National Resources in Peril
Author: National Research Council,Division on Earth and Life Studies,Board on Earth Sciences and Resources,Committee on Earth Resources,Committee on the Preservation of Geoscience Data and Collections
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 9780309169660
Category: Science
Page: 128
View: 6044
Geoscience data and collections (such as, rock and sediment cores, geophysical data, engineering records, and fossils) are necessary for industries to discover and develop domestic natural resources to fulfill the nation’s energy and mineral requirements and to improve the prediction of immediate and long term hazards, such as land slides, volcanic eruptions and global climate change. While the nation has assembled a wealth of geoscience data and collections, their utility remains incompletely tapped. Many could act as invaluable resources in the future but immediate action is needed if they are to remain available. Housing of and access to geoscience data and collections have become critical issues for industry, federal and state agencies, museums, and universities. Many resources are in imminent danger of being lost through mismanagement, neglect, or disposal. A striking 46 percent of the state geological surveys polled by the committee reported that there is no space available or they have refused to accept new material. In order to address these challenges, Geoscience Data and Collections offers a comprehensive strategy for managing geoscience data and collections in the United States.

    • Science

Glacial Geology

Ice Sheets and Landforms
Author: Matthew M. Bennett,Neil F. Glasser
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119966698
Category: Science
Page: 400
View: 4500
The new Second Edition of Glacial Geology provides a modern, comprehensive summary of glacial geology and geomorphology. It is has been thoroughly revised and updated from the original First Edition. This book will appeal to all students interested in the landforms and sediments that make up glacial landscapes. The aim of the book is to outline glacial landforms and sediments and to provide the reader with the tools required to interpret glacial landscapes. It describes how glaciers work and how the processes of glacial erosion and deposition which operate within them are recorded in the glacial landscape. The Second Edition is presented in the same clear and concise format as the First Edition, providing detailed explanations that are not cluttered with unnecessary detail. Additions include a new chapter on Glaciations around the Globe, demonstrating the range of glacial environments present on Earth today and a new chapter on Palaeoglaciology, explaining how glacial landforms and sediments are used in ice-sheet reconstructions. Like the original book, text boxes are used throughout to explain key concepts and to introduce students to case study material from the glacial literature. Newly updated sections on Further Reading are also included at the end of each chapter to point the reader towards key references. The book is illustrated throughout with colour photographs and illustrations.

    • Social Science

Environmental Social Science

Human - Environment interactions and Sustainability
Author: Emilio F. Moran
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444358278
Category: Social Science
Page: 232
View: 9474
Environmental Social Science offers a new synthesis of environmental studies, defining the nature of human-environment interactions and providing the foundation for a new cross-disciplinary enterprise that will make critical theories and research methods accessible across the natural and social sciences. Makes key theories and methods of the social sciences available to biologists and other environmental scientists Explains biological theories and concepts for the social sciences community working on the environment Helps bridge one of the difficult divides in collaborative work in human-environment research Includes much-needed descriptions of how to carry out research that is multinational, multiscale, multitemporal, and multidisciplinary within a complex systems theory context

    • Business & Economics

Why We Disagree about Climate Change

Understanding Controversy, Inaction and Opportunity
Author: Mike Hulme
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107268893
Category: Business & Economics
Page: N.A
View: 4216
Climate change is not 'a problem' waiting for 'a solution'. It is an environmental, cultural and political phenomenon which is re-shaping the way we think about ourselves, our societies and humanity's place on Earth. Drawing upon twenty-five years of professional work as an international climate change scientist and public commentator, Mike Hulme provides a unique insider's account of the emergence of this phenomenon and the diverse ways in which it is understood. He uses different standpoints from science, economics, faith, psychology, communication, sociology, politics and development to explain why we disagree about climate change. In this way he shows that climate change, far from being simply an 'issue' or a 'threat', can act as a catalyst to revise our perception of our place in the world. Why We Disagree About Climate Change is an important contribution to the ongoing debate over climate change and its likely impact on our lives.

    • Social Science

Trust in the Land

New Directions in Tribal Conservation
Author: Beth Rose Middleton
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816529280
Category: Social Science
Page: 324
View: 1560
"This book sets into motion a new wave of ideas concerning land conservation. It will appeal to Native and non-Native individuals and organizations interested in protecting the land as well as serving as a useful tool for environmentalists and government agencies."-back cover.

    • Nature

Global Warming

Understanding the Forecast
Author: David Archer
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470943416
Category: Nature
Page: 203
View: 1520
Archer's Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast2nd Edition, is the first real text to present thescience and policy surrounding climate change at the right level.Accompanying videos, simulations and instructional support makes iteasier to build a syllabus to improve and create new material onclimate change. Archer's polished writing style makes the textentertaining while the improved pedagogy helps better understandkey concepts, ideas and terms. This edition has been revised and reformulated with a newchapter template of short chapter introductions, study questions atthe end, and critical thinking puzzlers throughout. Also a newasset for the BCS was created that will give ideas for assignmentsand topics for essays and other projects. Furthermore, a number ofinteractive models have been built to help understand the scienceand systems behind the processes.

    • Science

Principles of Glacial Geomorphology and Geology


Author: Ireneo Peter Martini,Michael E. Brookfield,Steven Sadura
Publisher: Pearson College Division
ISBN: N.A
Category: Science
Page: 381
View: 2631
Featuring an accessible, non-mathematical, but rigorous conceptual treatment--with numerous very simple explanatory illustrations--this introduction to the basic principles of glaciology, geomorphology, and geology serves as a portal to the more advanced literature in the field and to discussion and research of the local situation. Focusing on processes and history (not just descriptions), it helps readers understand how glaciers form and move, what effect they have, when and where they have affected the Earth, and the consequences of ice ages. Covers a full range of topics from glaciology, geomorphology, and glacial geology: Ice Properties. Glaciers. Glacial Erosion. Glacial Transportation And Deposition. Glacial Landforms Formed By Glacial Sediments. Fluvial Sediments And Landforms. Glaciomarine And Glaciolacustrine Environments And Deposits. Aeolian Sediments And Landforms. Cold-Climate And Frozen-Ground Processes And Features. Quaternary Stratigraphy. Glacial Legacy (Isostasy, Eustasy, Volcanism, And Biota). The Cenozoic Ice Age. Pre-Quaternary Glaciations. Causes Of Glaciation. For anyone interested in Glacial Geology and Geomorphology.

    • Science

Power in a Warming World

The New Global Politics of Climate Change and the Remaking of Environmental Inequality
Author: David Ciplet,J. Timmons Roberts,Mizan R. Khan
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262330040
Category: Science
Page: 342
View: 5308
After nearly a quarter century of international negotiations on climate change, we stand at a crossroads. A new set of agreements is likely to fail to prevent the global climate's destabilization. Islands and coastlines face inundation, and widespread drought, flooding, and famine are expected to worsen in the poorest and most vulnerable countries. How did we arrive at an entirely inequitable and scientifically inadequate international response to climate change? In Power in a Warming World, David Ciplet, J. Timmons Roberts, and Mizan Khan, bring decades of combined experience as negotiators, researchers, and activists to bear on this urgent question. Combining rich empirical description with a political economic view of power relations, they document the struggles of states and social groups most vulnerable to a changing climate and describe the emergence of new political coalitions that take climate politics beyond a simple North-South divide. They offer six future scenarios in which power relations continue to shift as the world warms. A focus on incremental market-based reform, they argue, has proven insufficient for challenging the enduring power of fossil fuel interests, and will continue to be inadequate without a bolder, more inclusive and aggressive response.


    • Science

Climate and Social Stress:

Implications for Security Analysis
Author: Committee on Assessing the Impact of Climate Change on Social and Political Stresses,Board on Environmental Change and Society,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309278562
Category: Science
Page: 252
View: 3224
Climate change can reasonably be expected to increase the frequency and intensity of a variety of potentially disruptive environmental events--slowly at first, but then more quickly. It is prudent to expect to be surprised by the way in which these events may cascade, or have far-reaching effects. During the coming decade, certain climate-related events will produce consequences that exceed the capacity of the affected societies or global systems to manage; these may have global security implications. Although focused on events outside the United States, Climate and Social Stress: Implications for Security Analysis recommends a range of research and policy actions to create a whole-of-government approach to increasing understanding of complex and contingent connections between climate and security, and to inform choices about adapting to and reducing vulnerability to climate change.

    • Science

An Introduction to Atmospheric Physics


Author: Robert G. Fleagle,Joost A. Businger
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 9780080918228
Category: Science
Page: 42
View: 3372
This book is addressed to those who wish to understand the relationship between atmospheric phenomena and the nature of matter as expressed in the principles of physics. The interesting atmospheric phenomena are more than applications of gravitation, of thermodynamics, of hydrodynamics, or of electrodynamics; and mastery of the results of controlled experiment and of the related theory alone does not imply an understanding of atmospheric phenomena. This distinction arises because the extent and the complexity of the atmosphere permit effects and interactions that are entirely negligible in the laboratory or are deliberately excluded from it. the objective of laboratory physics is, by isolating the relevant variables, to reveal the fundamental properties of matter; whereas the objective of atmospheric physics, or of any observational science, is to understand those phenomena that are characteristic of the whole system. For these reasons the exposition of atmospheric physics requires substantial extensions of classical physics. It also requires that understanding be based on a coherent "way of seeing" the ensemble of atmospheric phenomena. Only then is understanding likely to stimulate still more general insights.

    • Science

Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum

How Humans Took Control of Climate
Author: William F. Ruddiman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400834730
Category: Science
Page: 240
View: 3143
The impact on climate from 200 years of industrial development is an everyday fact of life, but did humankind's active involvement in climate change really begin with the industrial revolution, as commonly believed? Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum has sparked lively scientific debate since it was first published--arguing that humans have actually been changing the climate for some 8,000 years--as a result of the earlier discovery of agriculture. The "Ruddiman Hypothesis" will spark intense debate. We learn that the impact of farming on greenhouse-gas levels, thousands of years before the industrial revolution, kept our planet notably warmer than if natural climate cycles had prevailed--quite possibly forestalling a new ice age. Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum is the first book to trace the full historical sweep of human interaction with Earth's climate. Ruddiman takes us through three broad stages of human history: when nature was in control; when humans began to take control, discovering agriculture and affecting climate through carbon dioxide and methane emissions; and, finally, the more recent human impact on climate change. Along the way he raises the fascinating possibility that plagues, by depleting human populations, also affected reforestation and thus climate--as suggested by dips in greenhouse gases when major pandemics have occurred. While our massive usage of fossil fuels has certainly contributed to modern climate change, Ruddiman shows that industrial growth is only part of the picture. The book concludes by looking to the future and critiquing the impact of special interest money on the global warming debate. In the afterword, Ruddiman explores the main challenges posed to his hypothesis, and shows how recent investigations and findings ultimately strengthen the book's original claims.

    • Science

With Speed and Violence

Why Scientists Fear Tipping Points in Climate Change
Author: Fred Pearce
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807085855
Category: Science
Page: 312
View: 6094
Nature is fragile, environmentalists often tell us. But the lesson of this book is that it is not so. The truth is far more worrying. Nature is strong and packs a serious counterpunch . . . Global warming will very probably unleash unstoppable planetary forces. And they will not be gradual. The history of our planet's climate shows that it does not do gradual change. Under pressure, whether from sunspots or orbital wobbles or the depredations of humans, it lurches-virtually overnight. —from the Introduction Fred Pearce has been writing about climate change for eighteen years, and the more he learns, the worse things look. Where once scientists were concerned about gradual climate change, now more and more of them fear we will soon be dealing with abrupt change resulting from triggering hidden tipping points. Even President Bush's top climate modeler, Jim Hansen, warned in 2005 that "we are on the precipice of climate system tipping points beyond which there is no redemption." As Pearce began working on this book, normally cautious scientists beat a path to his door to tell him about their fears and their latest findings. With Speed and Violence tells the stories of these scientists and their work-from the implications of melting permafrost in Siberia and the huge river systems of meltwater beneath the icecaps of Greenland and Antarctica to the effects of the "ocean conveyor" and a rare molecule that runs virtually the entire cleanup system for the planet. Above all, the scientists told him what they're now learning about the speed and violence of past natural climate change-and what it portends for our future. With Speed and Violence is the most up-to-date and readable book yet about the growing evidence for global warming and the large climatic effects it may unleash.

    • Science

"T. rex" and the Crater of Doom


Author: Walter Alvarez
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400847400
Category: Science
Page: 208
View: 2347
Sixty-five million years ago, a comet or asteroid larger than Mount Everest slammed into the Earth, inducing an explosion equivalent to the detonation of a hundred million hydrogen bombs. Vaporized detritus blasted through the atmosphere upon impact, falling back to Earth around the globe. Disastrous environmental consequences ensued: a giant tsunami, continent-scale wildfires, darkness, and cold, followed by sweltering greenhouse heat. When conditions returned to normal, half the plant and animal genera on Earth had perished. This horrific chain of events is now widely accepted as the solution to a great scientific mystery: what caused the extinction of the dinosaurs? Walter Alvarez, one of the Berkeley scientists who discovered evidence of the impact, tells the story behind the development of the initially controversial theory. It is a saga of high adventure in remote locations, of arduous data collection and intellectual struggle, of long periods of frustration ended by sudden breakthroughs, of friendships made and lost, and of the exhilaration of discovery that forever altered our understanding of Earth's geological history.