• Social Science

There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack


Author: Paul Gilroy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134438656
Category: Social Science
Page: 416
View: 5721
This classic book is a powerful indictment of contemporary attitudes to race. By accusing British intellectuals and politicians on both sides of the political divide of refusing to take race seriously, Paul Gilroy caused immediate uproar when this book was first published in 1987. A brilliant and explosive exploration of racial discourses, There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack provided a powerful new direction for race relations in Britain. Still dynamite today and as relevant as ever, this Routledge Classics edition includes a new introduction by the author.

    • Social Science

There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack


Author: Paul Gilroy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134438664
Category: Social Science
Page: 416
View: 1020
This classic book is a powerful indictment of contemporary attitudes to race. By accusing British intellectuals and politicians on both sides of the political divide of refusing to take race seriously, Paul Gilroy caused immediate uproar when this book was first published in 1987. A brilliant and explosive exploration of racial discourses, There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack provided a powerful new direction for race relations in Britain. Still dynamite today and as relevant as ever, this Routledge Classics edition includes a new introduction by the author.

    • Biography & Autobiography

'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack'

The Cultural Politics of Race and Nation
Author: Paul Gilroy
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226294278
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 271
View: 6558
Gilroy demonstrates the enormous complexity of racial politics in England today. Exploring the relationships among race, class, and nation as they have evolved over the past twenty years, he highlights racist attitudes that transcend the left-right political divide. He challenges current sociological approaches to racism as well as the ethnocentric bias of British cultural studies. "Gilroy demonstrates effectively that cultural traditions are not static, but develop, grow and indeed mutate, as they influence and are influenced by the other changing traditions around them."—David Edgar, Listener Review of Books. "A fascinating analysis of the discourses that have accompanied black settlement in Britain. . . . An important addition to the stock of critical works on race and culture."—David Okuefuna, Chicago Tribune

    • Social Science

The Politics of Multiculturalism

Race and Racism in Contemporary Britain
Author: B. Pitcher
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230236820
Category: Social Science
Page: 220
View: 4288
Taking as a case study the racial politics of the British state under New Labour, this book advances an idea of multiculturalism as the only conceptual framework that is capable of making sense of the contradictions of contemporary race practice, where racism is simultaneously rejected and reproduced.

    • Social Science

Poverty, inequality and social work

The impact of neo-liberalism and austerity politics on welfare provision
Author: Cummins, Ian
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1447334833
Category: Social Science
Page: 200
View: 1989
This book offers a critical, sociological analysis of the domino effect of neoliberalism and austerity politics on the role of social work and wider welfare provision. It argues that social work should move away from the resultant emphasis on risk management and bureaucracy, and return to a focus on relational and community approaches as the cornerstone of practice. Applying theoretical frameworks to practice, including those of Bourdieu and the recent work of Wacquant, the book examines the development of neoliberal ideas and their impact on social welfare. It explores the implications of this across a range of areas of social work practice, including work with children and families, working with asylum seekers and refugees and mental health social work.

    • Science

CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY IN PRACTICE


Author: Miles Ogborn,Alison Blunt,Pyrs Gruffudd,David Pinder
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 144411896X
Category: Science
Page: 224
View: 9017
Cultural Geography in Practice provides an innovative and accessible approach to the sources, theories and methods of cultural geography. Written by an international team of prominent cultural geographers, all of whom are experienced researchers, this book is a fully illustrated guide to methodological approaches in cultural geography. In order to demonstrate the practice of cultural geography each chapter combines the following features: ·Practical instruction in using one of the main methods of cultural geography (e.g. interviewing, interpreting texts and visual images, participatory methods) ·An overview of a key area of concern in cultural geography (e.g. the body, national identity, empire, marginality) ·A nuts and bolts description of the actual application of the theories and methods within a piece of research With the addition of boxed definitions of key concepts and descriptions of research projects by students who devised and undertook them, Cultural Geography in Practice is an essential manual of research practice for both undergraduate and graduate geography students.

    • Social Science

EMPIRE STRIKES BACK

Race and Racism In 70's Britain
Author: Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies,
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134897022
Category: Social Science
Page: 324
View: 1627
First Published in 1982. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

    • Music

Darker Than Blue

On the Moral Economies of Black Atlantic Culture
Author: Paul Gilroy
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674035706
Category: Music
Page: 207
View: 8817
Paul Gilroy seeks to awaken a new understanding of W. E. B. Du Boisâe(tm) intellectual and political legacy. At a time of economic crisis, environmental degradation, ongoing warfare, and heated debate over human rights, how should we reassess the changing place of black culture? Gilroy considers the ways that consumerism has diverted African Americansâe(tm) political and social aspirations. Luxury goods and branded items, especially the automobileâe"rich in symbolic value and the promise of individual freedomâe"have restratified society, weakened citizenship, and diminished the collective spirit. Jazz, blues, soul, reggae, and hip hop are now seen as generically American, yet artists like Jimi Hendrix, Chuck Berry, and Bob Marley, who questioned the allure of mobility and speed, are not understood by people who have drained their music of its moral power. Gilroy explores the way in which objects and technologies can become dynamic social forces, ensuring black cultureâe(tm)s global reach while undermining the drive for equality and justice. Drawing on the work of a number of thinkers, including Michel Foucault, Hannah Arendt, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon, he examines the ethical dimensions of living in a society that celebrates the object. What are the implications for our notions of freedom? With his brilliant, provocative analysis and astonishing range of reference, Gilroy revitalizes the study of African American culture. He traces the shifting character of black intellectual and social movements, and shows how we can construct an account of moral progress that reflects todayâe(tm)s complex realities.

    • Social Science

After Empire

Melancholia Or Convivial Culture?
Author: Paul Gilroy
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415343084
Category: Social Science
Page: 183
View: 1966
'After Empire' explores Britain's failure to come to terms with the loss of its empire and pre-eminent global standing. It shows that what we make of the country's postcolonial opportunity will influence the future of Europe and the viability of race as a political category.

    • History

How the Irish Became White


Author: Noel Ignatiev
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135070695
Category: History
Page: 276
View: 1123
'...from time to time a study comes along that truly can be called ‘path breaking,’ ‘seminal,’ ‘essential,’ a ‘must read.’ How the Irish Became White is such a study.' John Bracey, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachussetts, Amherst The Irish came to America in the eighteenth century, fleeing a homeland under foreign occupation and a caste system that regarded them as the lowest form of humanity. In the new country – a land of opportunity – they found a very different form of social hierarchy, one that was based on the color of a person’s skin. Noel Ignatiev’s 1995 book – the first published work of one of America’s leading and most controversial historians – tells the story of how the oppressed became the oppressors; how the new Irish immigrants achieved acceptance among an initially hostile population only by proving that they could be more brutal in their oppression of African Americans than the nativists. This is the story of How the Irish Became White.

    • Language Arts & Disciplines

Race(ing) Intercultural Communication

Racial Logics in a Colorblind Era
Author: Dreama G. Moon,Michelle A. Holling
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317414284
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 206
View: 406
Race(ing) Intercultural Communication signals a crucial intervention in the field, as well as in wider society, where social and political events are calling for new ways of making sense of race in the 21st century. Contributors to this book work at multiple intersections, theoretically and methodologically, in order to highlight relational (im)possibilities for intercultural communication. Chapters underscore the continuing importance of studying race, and the diverse mechanisms that maintain racial logics both in the U. S. and globally. In the so-called ‘post-racial’ era in which we live, not only are disrupting notions of colour-blindness crucially important, but so too are imagining new ways of thinking through racial matters. Ranging from discussions of new media, popular culture, and political discourse, to resistance literature, gay culture, and academia, contributors produce incisive analyses of the operations of race and white domination, including the myriad ways in which these discourses are reproduced and disrupted. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication.

    • Literary Criticism

Mongrel Nation

Diasporic Culture and the Making of Postcolonial Britain
Author: Ashley Dawson
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 9780472069910
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 226
View: 3916
Mongrel Nation surveys the history of the United Kingdom’s African, Asian, and Caribbean populations from 1948 to the present, working at the juncture of cultural studies, literary criticism, and postcolonial theory. Ashley Dawson argues that during the past fifty years Asian and black intellectuals from Sam Selvon to Zadie Smith have continually challenged the United Kingdom’s exclusionary definitions of citizenship, using innovative forms of cultural expression to reconfigure definitions of belonging in the postcolonial age. By examining popular culture and exploring topics such as the nexus of race and gender, the growth of transnational politics, and the clash between first- and second-generation immigrants, Dawson broadens and enlivens the field of postcolonial studies. Mongrel Nation gives readers a broad landscape from which to view the shifting currents of politics, literature, and culture in postcolonial Britain. At a time when the contradictions of expansionist braggadocio again dominate the world stage, Mongrel Nation usefully illuminates the legacy of imperialism and suggests that creative voices of resistance can never be silenced.Dawson “Elegant, eloquent, and full of imaginative insight, Mongrel Nation is a refreshing, engaged, and informative addition to post-colonial and diasporic literary scholarship.” —Hazel V. Carby, Yale University “Eloquent and strong, insightful and historically precise, lively and engaging, Mongrel Nation is an expansive history of twentieth-century internationalist encounters that provides a broader landscape from which to understand currents, shifts, and historical junctures that shaped the international postcolonial imagination.” —May Joseph, Pratt Institute Ashley Dawson is Associate Professor of English at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center and the College of Staten Island. He is coeditor of the forthcoming Exceptional State: Contemporary U.S. Culture and the New Imperialism.

    • Art

Roots & Culture

Cultural Politics in the Making of Black Britain
Author: Eddie Chambers
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1786720744
Category: Art
Page: 304
View: 4550
How did a distinct and powerful Black British identity emerge? In the 1950s, when many Caribbean migrants came to Britain, there was no such recognised entity as “Black Britain.” Yet by the 1980s, the cultural landscape had radically changed, and a remarkable array of creative practices such as theatre, poetry, literature,South Sudan in War and Peace music and the visual arts gave voice to striking new articulations of Black-British identity.

    • Philosophy

Postcolonial Melancholia


Author: Paul Gilroy
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231134541
Category: Philosophy
Page: 170
View: 2080
In Postcolonial Melancholia, Paul Gilroy continues the conversation he began in his landmark study of race and nation, 'There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack, ' by once again departing from conventional wisdom to examine-and defend-multiculturalism within the context of a post-9/11 "politics of security." Gilroy adapts the concept of melancholia from its Freudian origins and applies it to the social pathology of neoimperialist politics. His unorthodox analysis pinpoints melancholic reactions not only in the hostility and violence directed at blacks, immigrants, and aliens but also in an inability to value the ordinary, unruly multiculture that has evolved organically and unnoticed in urban centers. Drawing on seminal discussions of race by Frantz Fanon, W. E. B. DuBois, and George Orwell, Gilroy goes beyond the idea of mere tolerance and proposes that it is possible to celebrate multiculture and live with otherness without becoming anxious, fearful, or violent.

    • Social Science

The New Black Sociologists

Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
Author: Marcus A. Hunter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429018053
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 2973
The New Black Sociologists follows in the footsteps of 1974’s pioneering text Black Sociologists: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, by tracing the organization of its forbearer in key thematic ways. This new collection of essays revisits the legacies of significant Black scholars including James E. Blackwell, William Julius Wilson, Joyce Ladner, and Mary Pattillo, but also extends coverage to include overlooked figures like Audre Lorde, Ida B. Wells, James Baldwin and August Wilson - whose lives and work have inspired new generations of Black sociologists on contemporary issues of racial segregation, feminism, religiosity, class, inequality and urban studies. Rather than a culmination of the legacies past, this volume signals a new starting point bearing the gifts inherited and the weight of the all-important work ahead.

    • India

New Quest


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: India
Page: N.A
View: 3861

    • Social Science

Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare

Photography and the African American Freedom Struggle
Author: Leigh Raiford
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 080788233X
Category: Social Science
Page: 312
View: 4571
In Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare, Leigh Raiford argues that over the past one hundred years, activists in the black freedom struggle have used photographic imagery both to gain political recognition and to develop a different visual vocabulary about black lives. Offering readings of the use of photography in the anti-lynching movement, the civil rights movement, and the black power movement, Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare focuses on key transformations in technology, society, and politics to understand the evolution of photography's deployment in capturing white oppression, black resistance, and African American life.

    • Education

The Nigger in You

Challenging Dysfunctional Language, Engaging Leadership Moments
Author: J. W. Wiley
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 1579229883
Category: Education
Page: 256
View: 8026
Embrace Leadership to Combat All Forms of Prejudice Is there a “nigger” in you? If you have attempted to avoid and/or escape oppression, been made to feel as if you are a problem, been treated as “lesser than” or even like a criminal, all just because you are different in a given context, then what Dr. J. W. Wiley asserts through the title of this book inescapably applies to you. Through any of our multiple identities—stereotyped, marginalized, or ostracized by our socio-economic class, level of education, gender, disability, age, race, sexual orientation, or religion—we are all potential victims as well as perpetrators of denigrating language and discrimination. Dr. Wiley borrows the agency of nigger, arguably the quintessential, most universally known term of disparagement of those negatively considered the Other, to re-frame the word as no longer just a racial term but one that symbolizes many of the ways we disrespect or bully one another, are inconsiderate of one another, prejudge one another, and internalize our demonization. He defines the word in a way that demonstrates its equivalence to other dysfunctional language (retard, bitch, fag, trailer trash, etc.) that suggests that those so targeted are unworthy of consideration in our society. By creating a conversation around such language, Dr. Wiley challenges us to recognize that, when we give in to our prejudices and stereotypes, the “nigger in you” is what we are apt to see when we encounter those different from ourselves. The author, who is Director of the Center for Diversity, Pluralism, and Inclusion for the State University of New York–Plattsburg, a Lecturer in Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies, and president of his own consulting business, engages diversity in a uniquely inclusive way and as inseparable from social justice. By dissecting the offensive language we often use, consciously or unconsciously, Dr. Wiley provokes us to recognize that, since every one of us has multiple identities beyond just the color of our skin, it is virtually impossible for most of us not to have felt the sting of oppression, or the power of privilege that some of those same multiple identities may confer on us. Consequently, it is morally incumbent on us to contest and ultimately transcend oppression wherever we encounter it, to respect the humanity of those different from us, and become allies in the war to protect and advance people’s right to be different. Through personal stories, scholarship, poetry, commentary on current affairs, lyrics, and his experiences as a Black man both rooted in African American culture and the culture of the academy who daily has to navigate and negotiate multiple worlds, Dr. Wiley leads us on a journey toward social justice. In doing so, he empowers us—in whatever sphere, private or public, in which we have some agency—to embrace our leadership moments by engaging those who would perpetrate dysfunctional language or behavior, and help create a world in which differences are respected and validated.

    • History

The Battle of Britishness

Migrant Journeys, 1685 to the Present
Author: Tony Kushner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0719066409
Category: History
Page: 318
View: 8239
Analyzing the history and memory of migrant journeys, covering not only the response of politicians and the public but also literary and artistic representations, then and now, Kushner's volume sheds new light on the nature and construction of Britishness from the early modern era onwards.

    • Social Science

Racism

A Beginner's Guide
Author: Alana Lentin
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
ISBN: 1780741766
Category: Social Science
Page: 184
View: 2809
Despite the fact that we’ve spent hundreds of millions of dollars promoting tolerance, racism is still prevalent today. In fact, since 9-11 the subject of race, and exactly what this means, has become more important than ever before. Alana Lentin traces the development and mutation of ideas about race, through political history right up to modern debates about ethnicity and xenophobia, and considers the implications of a ‘raceless’ society amid concerns about diluted traditions and identities. Thought-provoking and intelligent, this invaluable resource exposes the roots of racist thought, and reveals how it has remained a part of our everyday lives. Alana Lentin is Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Sussex, UK.