• History

Time and Memory in Indigenous Amazonia

Anthropological Perspectives
Author: Carlos Fausto,Michael Heckenberger
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813044798
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 8787
“Broadens and deepens the anthropological project of understanding histories and historicities in Lowland South America that has emerged as a central theme in recent decades. . . . The outstanding quality and ethnographic richness of the nine case studies included in the volume are a tribute to just how far Amazonian ethnology has come since the 1980s.”—Journal of Anthropological Research “Explores the native Amazonian sense of history in a way that enriched previous debates about 'cold' and 'hot' societies. The book does more than simply engage ethnography with temporality; it demonstrates that 'historicity' and 'identity' are mutually constitutive.”—Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America “Brings together an international collection of leading Amazonia specialists to rethink some of the most fundamental categories through which anthropologists have traditionally conceptualized history and change. The result is a sophisticated interrogation of the ways we normally think about indigenous Amazonian cultures and a productive challenge to anthropology as a whole.”—Donald Pollock, State University of New York, Buffalo Based on recent ethnographic fieldwork and firsthand analysis of indigenous history, this collection examines the concepts of time and change as they played out in areas ranging from religion, cosmology, and mortuary practices to attitudes toward ethnic difference and the treatment of animals. Without imposing traditionally Western notions of what “time” and “change” mean, the collection looks at how native Amazonians experienced forms of cultural memory and at how their narratives of the past helped construct their sense of the present and, inevitably, their own identity. The volume offers some of the most interesting and nuanced discussions to date on Amazonian conceptualizations of temporality and change. Carlos Fausto, associate professor of anthropology at the Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, is the author of Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia. Michael Heckenberger, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Florida, is the author of The Ecology of Power: Culture, Place and Personhood in the Southern Amazon, AD 1000–2000.

    • History

Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia


Author: Carlos Fausto
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107020069
Category: History
Page: 347
View: 4549
Describes the culture of the Parakanã, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, focusing on conflict and ritual.

    • Social Science

Fluent Selves

Autobiography, Person, and History in Lowland South America
Author: Suzanne Oakdale,Magnus Course
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803265158
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 1704
Fluent Selves examines narrative practices throughout lowland South America focusing on indigenous communities in Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and Peru, illuminating the social and cultural processes that make the past as important as the present for these peoples. This collection brings together leading scholars in the fields of anthropology and linguistics to examine the intersection of these narratives of the past with the construction of personhood. The volume’s exploration of autobiographical and biographical accounts raises questions about fieldwork, ethical practices, and cultural boundaries in the study of anthropology. Rather than relying on a simple opposition between the “Western individual” and the non-Western rest, contributors to Fluent Selves explore the complex interplay of both individualizing as well as relational personhood in these practices. Transcending classic debates over the categorization of “myth” and “history,” the autobiographical and biographical narratives in Fluent Selves illustrate the very medium in which several modes of engaging with the past meet, are reconciled, and reemerge.

    • Social Science

Death, Mourning, and Burial

A Cross-Cultural Reader
Author: Antonius C. G. M. Robben
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119151759
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 4205
The definitive reference on the anthropology of death and dying, expanded with new contributions covering everything from animal mourning to mortuary cannibalism Few subjects stir the imagination more than the study of how people across cultures deal with death and dying. This expanded second edition of the internationally bestselling Death, Mourning, and Burial offers cross-cultural readings that span the period from dying to afterlife, considering approaches to this transition as a social process and exploring the great variations of cultural responses to death. Exploring new content including organ transplantation, institutionalized care for the dying, HIV-AIDs, animal mourning, and biotechnology, this text retains classic readings from the first edition, and is enhanced by sixteen new articles and two new sections which provide increased breadth and depth for readers. Death, Mourning, and Burial, Second Edition is divided into eight parts reflecting the social trajectory of death: conceptualizations of death; death, dying, and care; grief and mourning; mortuary rituals; and remembrance and regeneration. Sections are introduced through foundational texts which provide the ideal introduction to this diverse field. It is essential reading for anyone concerned with issues of death and dying, as well as violence, terrorism, war, state terror, organ theft, and mortuary rituals. A thoroughly revised edition of this classic anthology featuring twenty-three new articles, two new sections, and three reformulated sections Updated to include current topics, including organ transplantation, institutionalized care for the dying, HIV-AIDs, animal mourning, and biotechnology Must reading for anyone concerned with issues of death and dying, as well as violence, terrorism, war, state terror, organ theft, and mortuary rituals Serves as a text for anthropology classes and provides a genuinely cross-cultural perspective to all those studying death and dying

    • Religion

Ownership and Nurture

Studies in Native Amazonian Property Relations
Author: Marc Brightman,Carlos Fausto,Vanessa Grotti
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1785330837
Category: Religion
Page: 270
View: 4311
The first book to address the classic anthropological theme of property through the ethnography of Amazonia, Ownership and Nurture sets new and challenging terms for anthropological debates about the region and about property in general. Property and ownership have special significance and carry specific meanings in Amazonia, which has been portrayed as the antithesis of Western, property-based, civilization. Through carefully constructed studies of land ownership, slavery, shamanism, spirit mastery, aesthetics, and intellectual property, this volume demonstrates that property relations are of central importance in Amazonia, and that the ownership of persons plays an especially significant role in native cosmology.

    • Social Science

Indigenous Youth in Brazilian Amazonia

Changing Lived Worlds
Author: P. Virtanen
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137266511
Category: Social Science
Page: 221
View: 1743
How do Amazonian native young people perceive, question, and negotiate the new kinds of social and cultural situations in which they find themselves? Virtanen looks at how current power relations constituted by ethnic recognition, new social contacts, and cooperation with different institutions have shaped the current native youth in Amazonia.


    • Social Science

Customizing indigeneity

paths to a visionary politics in Peru
Author: Shane Greene
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804761192
Category: Social Science
Page: 244
View: 7526
Customizing Indigeneity follows the Aguaruna on their paths to becoming leaders of Peru's Amazonian movement, revealing both their creative cultural agency and the constraints of contemporary indigenous movement politics along the way.

    • History

Vital enemies

slavery, predation, and the Amerindian political economy of life
Author: Fernando Santos-Granero
Publisher: Univ of Texas Pr
ISBN: 9780292718883
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 4623
Analyzing slavery and other forms of servitude in six non-state indigenous societies of tropical America at the time of European contact, Vital Enemies offers a fascinating new approach to the study of slavery based on the notion of "political economy of life." Fernando Santos-Granero draws on the earliest available historical sources to provide novel information on Amerindian regimes of servitude, sociologies of submission, and ideologies of capture. Estimating that captive slaves represented up to 20 percent of the total population and up to 40 percent when combined with other forms of servitude, Santos-Granero argues that native forms of servitude fulfill the modern understandings of slavery, though Amerindian contexts provide crucial distinctions with slavery as it developed in the American South. The Amerindian understanding of life forces as being finite, scarce, unequally distributed, and in constant circulation yields a concept of all living beings as competing for vital energy. The capture of human beings is an extreme manifestation of this understanding, but it marks an important element in the ways Amerindian "captive slavery" was misconstrued by European conquistadors. Illuminating a cultural facet that has been widely overlooked or miscast for centuries, Vital Enemies makes possible new dialogues regarding hierarchies in the field of native studies, as well as a provocative re-framing of pre- and post-contact America.

    • Indians of Central America

Latin American Antiquity

A Journal of the Society for American Archaeology
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Indians of Central America
Page: N.A
View: 5892

    • Science

Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology

Studies in the Neotropical Lowlands
Author: William L. Balée,Clark L. Erickson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231509618
Category: Science
Page: 432
View: 1153
This collection of studies by anthropologists, botanists, ecologists, and biologists is an important contribution to the emerging field of historical ecology. The book combines cutting-edge research with new perspectives to emphasize the close relationship between humans and their natural environment. Contributors examine how alterations in the natural world mirror human cultures, societies, and languages. Treating the landscape like a text, these researchers decipher patterns and meaning in the Ecuadorian Andes, Amazonia, the desert coast of Peru, and other regions in the neotropics. They show how local peoples have changed the landscape over time to fit their needs by managing and modifying species diversity, enhancing landscape heterogeneity, and controlling ecological disturbance. In turn, the environment itself becomes a form of architecture rich with historical and archaeological significance. Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology explores thousands of years of ecological history while also addressing important contemporary issues, such as biodiversity and genetic variation and change. Engagingly written and expertly researched, this book introduces and exemplifies a unique method for better understanding the link between humans and the biosphere.

    • Social Science

Consuming Grief

Compassionate Cannibalism in an Amazonian Society
Author: Beth A. Conklin
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292782543
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 2538
Mourning the death of loved ones and recovering from their loss are universal human experiences, yet the grieving process is as different between cultures as it is among individuals. As late as the 1960s, the Wari' Indians of the western Amazonian rainforest ate the roasted flesh of their dead as an expression of compassion for the deceased and for his or her close relatives. By removing and transforming the corpse, which embodied ties between the living and the dead and was a focus of grief for the family of the deceased, Wari' death rites helped the bereaved kin accept their loss and go on with their lives. Drawing on the recollections of Wari' elders who participated in consuming the dead, this book presents one of the richest, most authoritative ethnographic accounts of funerary cannibalism ever recorded. Beth Conklin explores Wari' conceptions of person, body, and spirit, as well as indigenous understandings of memory and emotion, to explain why the Wari' felt that corpses must be destroyed and why they preferred cannibalism over cremation. Her findings challenge many commonly held beliefs about cannibalism and show why, in Wari' terms, it was considered the most honorable and compassionate way of treating the dead.

    • Social Science

Wisdom Sits in Places

Landscape and Language Among the Western Apache
Author: Keith H. Basso
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826327052
Category: Social Science
Page: 192
View: 4835
This remarkable book introduces us to four unforgettable Apache people, each of whom offers a different take on the significance of places in their culture. Apache conceptions of wisdom, manners and morals, and of their own history are inextricably intertwined with place, and by allowing us to overhear his conversations with Apaches on these subjects Basso expands our awareness of what place can mean to people. Most of us use the term sense of place often and rather carelessly when we think of nature or home or literature. Our senses of place, however, come not only from our individual experiences but also from our cultures. Wisdom Sits in Places, the first sustained study of places and place-names by an anthropologist, explores place, places, and what they mean to a particular group of people, the Western Apache in Arizona. For more than thirty years, Keith Basso has been doing fieldwork among the Western Apache, and now he shares with us what he has learned of Apache place-names--where they come from and what they mean to Apaches. "This is indeed a brilliant exposition of landscape and language in the world of the Western Apache. But it is more than that. Keith Basso gives us to understand something about the sacred and indivisible nature of words and place. And this is a universal equation, a balance in the universe. Place may be the first of all concepts; it may be the oldest of all words."--N. Scott Momaday "In Wisdom Sits in Places Keith Basso lifts a veil on the most elemental poetry of human experience, which is the naming of the world. In so doing he invests his scholarship with that rarest of scholarly qualities: a sense of spiritual exploration. Through his clear eyes we glimpse the spirit of a remarkable people and their land, and when we look away, we see our own world afresh."--William deBuys "A very exciting book--authoritative, fully informed, extremely thoughtful, and also engagingly written and a joy to read. Guiding us vividly among the landscapes and related story-tellings of the Western Apache, Basso explores in a highly readable way the role of language in the complex but compelling theme of a people's attachment to place. An important book by an eminent scholar."--Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.

    • Social Science

Nature and Society

Anthropological Perspectives
Author: Philippe Descola,Gisli Palsson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134827156
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 4833
The contributors to this book focus on the relationship between nature and society from a variety of theoretical and ethnographic perspectives. Their work draws upon recent developments in social theory, biology, ethnobiology, epistemology, sociology of science, and a wide array of ethnographic case studies -- from Amazonia, the Solomon Islands, Malaysia, the Mollucan Islands, rural comunities from Japan and north-west Europe, urban Greece, and laboratories of molecular biology and high-energy physics. The discussion is divided into three parts, emphasising the problems posed by the nature-culture dualism, some misguided attempts to respond to these problems, and potential avenues out of the current dilemmas of ecological discourse.

    • Social Science

Landscapes of Devils

Tensions of Place and Memory in the Argentinean Chaco
Author: Gastón R. Gordillo
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082238602X
Category: Social Science
Page: 326
View: 5887
Landscapes of Devils is a rich, historically grounded ethnography of the western Toba, an indigenous people in northern Argentina’s Gran Chaco region. In the early twentieth century, the Toba were defeated by the Argentinean army, incorporated into the seasonal labor force of distant sugar plantations, and proselytized by British Anglicans. Gastón R. Gordillo reveals how the Toba’s memory of these processes is embedded in their experience of “the bush” that dominates the Chaco landscape. As Gordillo explains, the bush is the result of social, cultural, and political processes that intertwine this place with other geographies. Labor exploitation, state violence, encroachment by settlers, and the demands of Anglican missionaries all transformed this land. The Toba’s lives have been torn between alienating work in sugar plantations and relative freedom in the bush, between moments of domination and autonomy, abundance and poverty, terror and healing. Part of this contradictory experience is culturally expressed in devils, evil spirits that acquire different features in different places. The devils are sources of death and disease in the plantations, but in the bush they are entities that connect with humans as providers of bush food and healing power. Enacted through memory, the experiences of the Toba have produced a tense and shifting geography. Combining extensive fieldwork conducted over a decade, historical research, and critical theory, Gordillo offers a nuanced analysis of the Toba’s social memory and a powerful argument that geographic places are not only objective entities but also the subjective outcome of historical forces.

    • Social Science

Praying and Preying

Christianity in Indigenous Amazonia
Author: Aparecida Vilaca
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520963849
Category: Social Science
Page: 330
View: 6991
Praying and Preying offers one of the rare anthropological monographs on the Christian experience of contemporary Amazonian indigenous peoples, based on an ethnographic study of the relationship between the Wari’, inhabitants of Brazilian Amazonia, and the Evangelical missionaries of the New Tribes Mission. Vilaça turns to a vast range of historical, ethnographic and mythological material related to both the Wari’ and missionaries perspectives and the author’s own ethnographic field notes from her more than 30-year involvement with the Wari’ community. Developing a close dialogue between the Melanesian literature, which informs much of the recent work in the Anthropology of Christianity, and the concepts and theories deriving from Amazonian ethnology, in particular the notions of openness to the other, unstable dualism, and perspectivism, the author provides a fine-grained analysis of the equivocations and paradoxes that underlie the translation processes performed by the different agents involved and their implications for the transformation of the native notion of personhood.

    • Business & Economics

Indigenous Peoples' Food Systems

The Many Dimensions of Culture, Diversity and Environment for Nutrition and Health
Author: Harriet V. Kuhnlein,Bill Erasmus,Dina Spigelski
Publisher: Food & Agriculture Org
ISBN: 9789251060711
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 339
View: 7592
Explores the nutritional systems of indigenous communities around the world through case studies and research findings that cover such issues as food diversity, the traditions linked to the commodity, and how globalization is impacting their overall health.

    • History

Indigenous Struggle at the Heart of Brazil

State Policy, Frontier Expansion, and the Xavante Indians, 1937–1988
Author: Seth Garfield
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822326656
Category: History
Page: 316
View: 2415
DIVHow the Xavante Indians have reshaped the Brazilian government’s policies of nationalism and assimiliation./div

    • Social Science

The Global Prehistory of Human Migration


Author: Immanuel Ness
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118970586
Category: Social Science
Page: 448
View: 6723
Previously published as the first volume of The Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration, this work is devoted exclusively to prehistoric migration, covering all periods and places from the first hominin migrations out of Africa through the end of prehistory. Presents interdisciplinary coverage of this topic, including scholarship from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, genetics, biology, linguistics, and more Includes contributions from a diverse international team of authors, representing 17 countries and a variety of disciplines Divided into two sections, covering the Pleistocene and Holocene; each section examines human migration through chapters that focus on different regional and disciplinary lenses

    • Biography & Autobiography

The Falling Sky


Author: Davi Kopenawa
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674726111
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 645
View: 7256
Anthropologist Bruce Albert captures the poetic voice of Davi Kopenawa, shaman and spokesman for the Yanomami of the Brazilian Amazon, in this unique reading experience--a coming-of-age story, historical account, and shamanic philosophy, but most of all an impassioned plea to respect native rights and preserve the Amazon rainforest.