• History

Trickster Travels

A Sixteenth-century Muslim Between Worlds
Author: Natalie Zemon Davis
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0809094347
Category: History
Page: 435
View: 9638
Presents the story of Leo Africanus and his famous sixteenth-century geography of Africa that was to introduce the continent to European readers, in a detailed history that documents such elements of his life as his imprisonment by the pope, work as a Christian writer, and relationships with powerful individuals from a range of cultures and religions.

    • History

Trickster Travels

A Sixteenth-Century Muslim Between Worlds
Author: Natalie Zemon Davis
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780374706661
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 6462
"[A] fascinating tale of a man forced . . . to live between incompatible worlds. Highly recommended." --Library Journal Al-Hasan al-Wazzan--born in Granada to a Muslim family that in 1492 went to Morocco--became famous as the great Renaissance writer Leo Africanus, author of the first geography of Africa to be published in Europe (in 1550). He had been captured by Christian pirates in the Mediterranean and imprisoned by the pope; when he was released and baptized, he lived a European life of scholarship as the Christian writer Giovanni Leone; by 1527, it is likely that he returned to North Africa and to the language, culture, and faith in which he had been raised. Natalie Zemon Davis offers a virtuoso study of the fragmentary, partial, and often contradictory traces that al-Hasan al-Wazzan left behind him, and a superb interpretation of his extraordinary life and work.

    • Social Science

Women on the Margins

Three Seventeenth-century Lives
Author: Natalie Zemon Davis
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674955202
Category: Social Science
Page: 360
View: 3574
In this fascinating book, Natalie Zemon Davis retrieves individual lives from historical obscurity to give readers a window onto the early modern world. Profiling three women--one Jewish, one Catholic, one Protestant--whose memoirs and writings make for a spellbinding tale, the author tells readers more about the life of early modern Europe than many an official history. 41 halftone illustrations.

    • History

Muslim Cosmopolitanism in the Age of Empire


Author: Seema Alavi
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674735331
Category: History
Page: 490
View: 646
Seema Alavi challenges the idea that all pan-Islamic configurations are anti-Western or pro-Caliphate. A pan-Islamic intellectual network at the cusp of the British and Ottoman empires became the basis of a global Muslim sensibility—a political and cultural affiliation that competes with ideas of nationhood today as it did in the last century.

    • History

Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery


Author: Nabil Matar
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023152854X
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 6540
During the early modern period, hundreds of Turks and Moors traded in English and Welsh ports, dazzled English society with exotic cuisine and Arabian horses, and worked small jobs in London, while the "Barbary Corsairs" raided coastal towns and, if captured, lingered in Plymouth jails or stood trial in Southampton courtrooms. In turn, Britons fought in Muslim armies, traded and settled in Moroccan or Tunisian harbor towns, joined the international community of pirates in Mediterranean and Atlantic outposts, served in Algerian households and ships, and endured captivity from Salee to Alexandria and from Fez to Mocha. In Turks, Moors, and Englishmen, Nabil Matar vividly presents new data about Anglo-Islamic social and historical interactions. Rather than looking exclusively at literary works, which tended to present unidimensional stereotypes of Muslims—Shakespeare's "superstitious Moor" or Goffe's "raging Turke," to name only two—Matar delves into hitherto unexamined English prison depositions, captives' memoirs, government documents, and Arabic chronicles and histories. The result is a significant alternative to the prevailing discourse on Islam, which nearly always centers around ethnocentrism and attempts at dominance over the non-Western world, and an astonishing revelation about the realities of exchange and familiarity between England and Muslim society in the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods. Concurrent with England's engagement and "discovery" of the Muslims was the "discovery" of the American Indians. In an original analysis, Matar shows how Hakluyt and Purchas taught their readers not only about America but about the Muslim dominions, too; how there were more reasons for Britons to venture eastward than westward; and how, in the period under study, more Englishmen lived in North Africa than in North America. Although Matar notes the sharp political and colonial differences between the English encounter with the Muslims and their encounter with the Indians, he shows how Elizabethan and Stuart writers articulated Muslim in terms of Indian, and Indian in terms of Muslim. By superimposing the sexual constructions of the Indians onto the Muslims, and by applying to them the ideology of holy war which had legitimated the destruction of the Indians, English writers prepared the groundwork for orientalism and for the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century conquest of Mediterranean Islam. Matar's detailed research provides a new direction in the study of England's geographic imagination. It also illuminates the subtleties and interchangeability of stereotype, racism, and demonization that must be taken into account in any responsible depiction of English history.

    • History

Mad for God

Bartolome Sanchez, the Secret Messiah of Cardenete
Author: Sara Tilghman Nalle
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813934621
Category: History
Page: 228
View: 1038
Convinced he was the Elijah Messiah, the Spanish peasant Bartolomé Sánchez believed that God had sent him in divine retribution for the crimes committed by the Inquisition and the Church. Sánchez's vocal and intolerable religious deviance quickly landed him in the very court he believed he was sent to destroy. Fortunately for him, the first inquisitor assigned to his case came to believe that Sánchez was not guilty by virtue of insanity, and tried to collect the proof that would save his life. For seven years, Sánchez shuttled between jails, hospitals, and his home village while his fate hung in the balance. Nalle convincingly evokes the compassion of Sánchez's first inquisitor, Pedro Cortes, as he struggled to save his prisoner's life, and argues that the Spanish, compared to other Europeans of the day, were remarkably rational and humane when dealing with the mentally ill. A gripping tale of madness and religious conviction, Mad for God offers new historical insight into the ongoing debate over the nature of religious inspiration, insanity, and criminal responsibility.

    • Fiction

Leo Africanus


Author: Amin Maalouf
Publisher: New Amsterdam Books
ISBN: 1461663318
Category: Fiction
Page: 368
View: 9915
"I, Hasan the son of Muhammad the weigh-master, I, Jean-Leon de Medici, circumcised at the hand of a barber and baptized at the hand of a pope, I am now called the African, but I am not from Africa, nor from Europe, nor from Arabia. I am also called the Granadan, the Fassi, the Zayyati, but I come from no country, from no city, no tribe. I am the son of the road, my country is the caravan, my life the most unexpected of voyages." Thus wrote Leo Africanus, in his fortieth year, in this imaginary autobiography of the famous geographer, adventurer, and scholar Hasan al-Wazzan, who was born in Granada in 1488. His family fled the Inquisition and took him to the city of Fez, in North Africa. Hasan became an itinerant merchant, and made many journeys to the East, journeys rich in adventure and observation. He was captured by a Sicilian pirate and taken back to Rome as a gift to Pope Leo X, who baptized him Johannes Leo. While in Rome, he wrote the first trilingual dictionary (Latin, Arabic and Hebrew), as well as his celebrated Description of Africa, for which he is still remembered as Leo Africanus.

    • History

A Man of Three Worlds

Samuel Pallache, a Moroccan Jew in Catholic and Protestant Europe
Author: Mercedes García-Arenal,Gerard Wiegers
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 0801895839
Category: History
Page: 200
View: 5739
In the late fifteenth century, many of the Jews expelled from Spain made their way to Morocco and established a dynamic community in Fez. A number of Jewish families became prominent in commerce and public life there. Among the Jews of Fez of Hispanic origin was Samuel Pallache, who served the Moroccan sultan as a commercial and diplomatic agent in Holland until Pallache's death in 1616. Before that, he had tried to return with his family to Spain, and to this end he tried to convert to Catholicism and worked as an informer, intermediary, and spy in Moroccan affairs for the Spanish court. Later he became a privateer against Spanish ships and was tried in London for that reason. His religious identity proved to be as mutable as his political allegiances: when in Amsterdam, he was devoutly Jewish; when in Spain, a loyal converso (a baptized Jew). In A Man of Three Worlds, Mercedes García-Arenal and Gerard Wiegers view Samuel Pallache's world as a microcosm of early modern society, one far more interconnected, cosmopolitan, and fluid than is often portrayed. Pallache's missions and misadventures took him from Islamic Fez and Catholic Spain to Protestant England and Holland. Through these travels, the authors explore the workings of the Moroccan sultanate and the Spanish court, the Jewish communities of Fez and Amsterdam, and details of the Atlantic-Mediterranean trade. At once a sweeping view of two continents, three faiths, and five nation-states and an intimate story of one man's remarkable life, A Man of Three Worlds is history at its most compelling. -- Richard L. Kagan, The Johns Hopkins University

    • History

Religious Warfare in Europe 1400-1536


Author: Norman Housley
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198208112
Category: History
Page: 238
View: 3841
Religious warfare has been a recurrent feature of European history. Norman Housley's readable and intelligent new study examines the spectrum of conflicts waged in God's name in the period from the Later Crusades to the early Reformation, making an important contribution to both areas of research. Professor Housley explores the interaction between Crusade and religious war in the broader sense, and argues that the religious violence of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries sprang from deeply rooted proclivities within European society.

    • History

Empress of the East

How a European Slave Girl Became Queen of the Ottoman Empire
Author: Leslie Peirce
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465093094
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 9299
The extraordinary story of the Russian slave girl Roxelana, who rose from concubine to become the only queen of the Ottoman empire In Empress of the East, historian Leslie Peirce tells the remarkable story of a Christian slave girl, Roxelana, who was abducted by slave traders from her Ruthenian homeland and brought to the harem of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent in Istanbul. Suleyman became besotted with her and foreswore all other concubines. Then, in an unprecedented step, he freed her and married her. The bold and canny Roxelana soon became a shrewd diplomat and philanthropist, who helped Suleyman keep pace with a changing world in which women, from Isabella of Hungary to Catherine de Medici, increasingly held the reins of power. Until now Roxelana has been seen as a seductress who brought ruin to the empire, but in Empress of the East, Peirce reveals the true history of an elusive figure who transformed the Ottoman harem into an institution of imperial rule.

Trickster Travels

A Sixteenth-century Muslim Between Worlds
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781448709755
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 2972

    • History

A Middle East Mosaic

Fragments of Life, Letters and History
Author: Bernard Lewis
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 0307430421
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 4506
In times of war and in peace, from the earliest days of the Roman Empire to our own, Westerners have journeyed to the lands of the middle east, bringing back accounts of their adventures and impressions. Yet it was never a one way exchange. From the first Arab embassy to the Vikings in the 9th century to the internet musings of the Taliban, A Middle East Mosaic collects a rich, boisterous literature of cultural exchange. We see the American Revolution through the eyes of a Moroccan Ambassador and the French Revolution through a series of Imperial Ottoman proclamations. We find surprising portraits of Napoleon ("a brigand chief"), TE Lawrence and Ataturk. We learn what George Washington and Machiavelli through t of Turkish politics and hear Flaubert and Thackeray rail against eastern crime and punishment. We peer into Voltaire's business correspondence and follow the footsteps of Mark Twain, Richard Burton, Gertrude Bell and Ibn Battutta, the Marco Polo of the east. Great discoveries are recorded - an Egyptian Ambassador is introduced to electricity and dismisses the spectacle as "frankish trickery;" another pronounces the invention of a secure mail system most useful for assignations. We enter the harem with a 16th century organ maker and emerge with Ottoman reform. It was not until the sixteenth century that the first middle eastern rulers entered into diplomatic relations with European rulers, but trade often precede diplomatic relations. Business men from the days of the crusades against Saladin to the oil prospecting of Samuel Cox and his descendents have seen great possibilities in the markets of the middle east. And throughout the centuries we have been united by war. We witness the outbreak of the Crimean war with Karl Marx and enter Egypt with Napoleon. We observe Arab customs with George Patton and visit Baghdad and Cairo with George F. Kennan in the second world war. When Usama bin Ladin rails against "Jews and crusaders" occupying the holy land, he is rehearsing a grievance with a long history. This symphony of voices, full of wit and wisdom, spite and wonder, suspicion, befuddlement and occasional insight, is ordered and explained by our foremost living historian of the middle east. The fruit of a lifetime of scholarship and erudition, A Middle East Mosaic is a dazzling capstone to a brilliant career. In a spirited reappraisal of western views of the east and eastern views of the west over the last two thousand years, Bernard Lewis gives us a brilliant over-view of 2,000 years of commerce, diplomacy, war and exploration. This book is a delight, a treasury of stories drawn from letters, diaries and histories, but also from unpublished archives and previously untranslated accounts. Diplomats and interpreters, slaves, soldiers, pilgrims and missionaries, princes and spies, businessmen, doctors and priests all pour forth their stories of the people and events that shaped history. A Middle East Mosaic cannot fail to appeal to anyone with an appetite for history and a curiosity about the vagaries of cultural exchange. From the Hardcover edition.

    • History

'Religion' and the Religions in the English Enlightenment


Author: Peter Harrison
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521892933
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 9271
This book shows how the concept of 'religion' and 'the religions' arose out of controversies in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England. The birth of 'the religions', conceived to be sets of beliefs and practices, enabled the establishment of a new science of religion in which the various 'religions' were studied and impartially compared.

    • History

Reformation Europe, 1517-1559


Author: Sir G. R. Elton
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1787200558
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 5101
A classic account of the Reformation, revealing the issues and preoccupations which seemed central to the age and portraying its leading figures with vigour and realism. The book is an analysis of the religious, economic, cultural and political history of Europe during the period of the Reformation. Author G. R. Elton examines the history of the period through the interrelationships between different forces in Europe at the time, such as the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, the Papacy, reformers such as Martin Luther, John Calvin, Martin Bucer and Zwingli, and explores the resultant Counter-Reformation and the beginnings of European colonisation of other parts of the world such as South America. Its central focus is upon the conflict between Luther and Charles V. “A masterly survey by a fine historian. He has gone to great pains to understand and do justice to the theological side, and if political history is still his strength there is no doubt that this paperback in scholarship, perspective and information far outweighs in value and importance most of the hard-bound studies of the 16th century in the last fifty years.”—E. GORDON RUPP “It is extremely pleasant to welcome a new History of Europe series in which the inaugural volume is of such high merit. Dr. Elton sets himself a difficult task; the result is a book written with the bold, subtle, assured pen of an accomplished scholar.”—JOEL HURSTFIELD “Not since Ranke has any historian described the religious and political history of Central Europe during the Reformation with as much insight and authority.”—H. G. KOENIGSBERGER, History (London) “Dr. Elton has put all students in his debt by providing an up-to-date and highly readable account of the ecclesiastical, political, and social history of Europe during the vital years 1517 to 1559...This book can be unreservedly commended.”—C. W. DUGMORE, The Journal of Ecclesiastical History

    • HISTORY

All Can Be Saved

Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World
Author: Stuart B. Schwartz
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300150539
Category: HISTORY
Page: 351
View: 7398
It would seem unlikely that one could discover tolerant religious attitudes in Spain, Portugal, and the New World colonies during the era of the Inquisition, when enforcement of Catholic orthodoxy was widespread and brutal. Yet this groundbreaking book does exactly that. Drawing on an enormous body of historical evidence--including records of the Inquisition itself--the historian Stuart Schwartz investigates the idea of religious tolerance and its evolution in the Hispanic world from 1500 to 1820. Focusing on the attitudes and beliefs of common people rather than those of intellectual elites, the author finds that no small segment of the population believed in freedom of conscience and rejected the exclusive validity of the Church. The book explores various sources of tolerant attitudes, the challenges that the New World presented to religious orthodoxy, the complex relations between popular and learned culture, and many related topics. The volume concludes with a discussion of the relativist ideas that were taking hold elsewhere in Europe during this era.

    • History

Travel Narratives from the Age of Discovery

An Anthology
Author: Peter C. Mancall
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195155976
Category: History
Page: 413
View: 8246
The fifteenth and sixteenth centuries ushered in a new era of discovery as explorers traversed the globe, returning home with vivid tales of distant lands and exotic peoples. Aided by the invention of the printing press in Europe, travelers were able to spread their accounts to wider audiences than ever before. In Travel Narratives from the Age of Discovery, historian Peter C. Mancall has compiled some of the most important travel accounts of this era. Written by authors from Spain, France, Italy, England, China, and North Africa describing locations that range from Brazil to Canada, China to Virginia, and Angola to Vietnam, these accounts provided crucial insight into unfamiliar cultures and environments, and also betrayed the prejudices of their own societies, revealing as much about the observers themselves as they did about faraway lands. From Christopher Columbus to lesser-known figures such as the Huguenot missionary Jean de Léry, this anthology brings together first-hand accounts of places connected by the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. Unlike other collections, Travel Narratives from the Age of Discovery offers a global view of travel at a crucial stage in world, and human, history, with accounts written by non-European authors, including two new translations. Included here are the Mughal Emperor Babur's first thoughts of India upon establishing his empire there, the Chinese chronicler Ma Huan's report detailing Chinese travel to the Middle East during the fifteenth century, and an account of Africa written by the man known as Leo Africanus. In addition to these travel narratives, this anthology features rare pictures from sixteenth-century printed books, including images of Brazil, Roanoke, Guiana, and India, which, together with the accounts themselves, provide a detailed understanding of the many ways in which fifteenth and sixteenth century travelers and readers imagined other worlds.

    • History

Cuban Émigrés and Independence in the Nineteenth-Century Gulf World


Author: Dalia Antonia Muller
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469631997
Category: History
Page: 324
View: 8232
During the violent years of war marking Cuba's final push for independence from Spain, over 3,000 Cuban emigres, men and women, rich and poor, fled to Mexico. But more than a safe haven, Mexico was a key site, Dalia Antonia Muller argues, from which the expatriates helped launch a mobile and politically active Cuban diaspora around the Gulf of Mexico. Offering a new transnational vantage on Cuba's struggle for nationhood, Muller traces the stories of three hundred of these Cuban emigres and explores the impact of their lives of exile, service to the revolution and independence, and circum-Caribbean solidarities. While not large in number, the emigres excelled at community building, and their effectiveness in disseminating their political views across borders intensified their influence and inspired strong nationalistic sentiments across Latin America. Revealing that emigres' efforts were key to a Cuban Revolutionary Party program for courting Mexican popular and diplomatic support, Muller shows how the relationship also benefited Mexican causes. Cuban revolutionary aspirations resonated with Mexican students, journalists, and others alarmed by the violation of constitutional rights and the increasing conservatism of the Porfirio Diaz regime. Finally, Muller follows emigres' return to Cuba after the Spanish-American War, their lives in the new republic ineluctably shaped by their sojourn in Mexico.

    • Literary Criticism

Fiction in the Archives

Pardon Tales and Their Tellers in Sixteenth-century France
Author: Natalie Zemon Davis
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804717991
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 217
View: 7006
To receive a royal pardon in sixteenth-century France for certain kinds of homicide--unpremeditated, unintended, in self-defense, or otherwise excusable--a supplicant had to tell the king a story. These stories took the form of letters of remission, documents narrated to royal notaries by admitted offenders who, in effect, stated their case for pardon to the king. Thousands of such stories are found in French archives, providing precious evidence of the narrative skills and interpretive schemes of peasants and artisans as well as the well-born. This book, by one of the most acclaimed historians of our time, is a pioneering effort to us the tools of literary analysis to interpret archival texts: to show how people from different stations in life shaped the events of a crime into a story, and to compare their stories with those told by Renaissance authors not intended to judge the truth or falsity of the pardon narratives, but rather to refer to the techniques for crafting stories. A number of fascinating crime stories, often possessing Rabelaisian humor, are told in the course of the book, which consists of three long chapters. These chapters explore the French law of homicide, depictions of "hot anger" and self-defense, and the distinctive characteristics of women's stories of bloodshed. The book is illustrated with seven contemporary woodcuts and a facsimile of a letter of remission, with appendixes providing several other original documents. This volume is based on the Harry Camp Memorial Lectures given at Stanford University in 1986.

    • History

Forbidden Passages

Muslims and Moriscos in Colonial Spanish America
Author: Karoline P. Cook
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812248244
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 4494
Forbidden Passages is the first book to document and evaluate the impact of Moriscos—Christian converts from Islam—in the early modern Americas, and how their presence challenged notions of what it meant to be Spanish as the Atlantic empire expanded.

    • History

The Mediterranean World

From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Napoleon
Author: Monique O'Connell,Eric R Dursteler
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421419025
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 5811
Located at the intersection of Asia, Africa, and Europe, the Mediterranean has connected societies for millennia, creating a shared space of intense economic, cultural, and political interaction. Greek temples in Sicily, Roman ruins in North Africa, and Ottoman fortifications in Greece serve as reminders that the Mediterranean has no fixed national boundaries or stable ethnic and religious identities. In The Mediterranean World, Monique O’Connell and Eric R Dursteler examine the history of this contested region from the medieval to the early modern era, beginning with the fall of Rome around 500 CE and closing with Napoleon’s attempted conquest of Egypt in 1798. Arguing convincingly that the Mediterranean should be studied as a singular unit, the authors explore the centuries when no lone power dominated the Mediterranean Sea and invaders brought their own unique languages and cultures to the region. Structured around four interlocking themes—mobility, state development, commerce, and frontiers—this beautifully illustrated book brings new dimensions to the concepts of Mediterranean nationality and identity.