• Social Science

What Anthropologists Do


Author: Veronica Strang
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 1847885462
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 1355
What is Anthropology? Why should you study it? What will you learn? And what can you do with it? What Anthropologists Do answers all these questions. And more. Anthropology is an astonishingly diverse and engaged subject that seeks to understand human social behaviour. What Anthropologists Do presents a lively introduction to the ways in which anthropologys unique research methods and cutting-edge thinking contribute to a very wide range of fields: environmental issues, aid and development, advocacy, human rights, social policy, the creative arts, museums, health, education, crime, communications technology, design, marketing, and business. In short, a training in Anthropology provides highly transferable skills of investigation and analysis. The book will be ideal for any readers who want to know what Anthropology is all about and especially for students coming to the study of Anthropology for the first time.

    • Social Science

What Anthropologists Do


Author: Veronica Strang
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 1847886264
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 2951
What is Anthropology? Why should you study it? What will you learn? And what can you do with it? What Anthropologists Do answers all these questions. And more. Anthropology is an astonishingly diverse and engaged subject that seeks to understand human social behaviour. What Anthropologists Do presents a lively introduction to the ways in which anthropology's unique research methods and cutting-edge thinking contribute to a very wide range of fields: environmental issues, aid and development, advocacy, human rights, social policy, the creative arts, museums, health, education, crime, communications technology, design, marketing, and business. In short, a training in Anthropology provides highly transferable skills of investigation and analysis. The book will be ideal for any readers who want to know what Anthropology is all about and especially for students coming to the study of Anthropology for the first time.

    • Social Science

How to Think Like an Anthropologist


Author: Matthew Engelke
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400889529
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 4375
From an award-winning anthropologist, a lively accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to the subject What is anthropology? What can it tell us about the world? Why, in short, does it matter? For well over a century, cultural anthropologists have circled the globe, from Papua New Guinea to suburban England and from China to California, uncovering surprising facts and insights about how humans organize their lives and articulate their values. In the process, anthropology has done more than any other discipline to reveal what culture means--and why it matters. By weaving together examples and theories from around the world, Matthew Engelke provides a lively, accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to anthropology, covering a wide range of classic and contemporary approaches, subjects, and practitioners. Presenting a set of memorable cases, he encourages readers to think deeply about some of the key concepts with which anthropology tries to make sense of the world—from culture and nature to authority and blood. Along the way, he shows why anthropology matters: not only because it helps us understand other cultures and points of view but also because, in the process, it reveals something about ourselves and our own cultures, too.

    • Nature

The Meaning of Water


Author: Veronica Strang
Publisher: Berg Pub Limited
ISBN: 9781859737484
Category: Nature
Page: 274
View: 4244
Water is the most valuable resource and the most passionately contested. Drought has become an increasingly extreme problem in many parts of the world, and it is predicted that 60% of the major cities in Europe will run short of water in the next decade. In industrialized countries per capita water usage continues to rise intractably, despite strenuous efforts by environmentalists and resource managers to encourage conservation. Conflicts over water and environmental degradation from the overuse of resources are intensifying. Water is not merely a physical resource: in every cultural context it is densely encoded with social, spiritual, political and environmental meanings, and these have a powerful effect upon patterns of water use and upon the relationships between water users and suppliers. This book makes an in-depth analysis of the meanings of water and considers how they are experienced and formed at an individual and societal level. Focusing on the River Stour in Dorset, Strang draws upon a wide range of data: ethnographic research, cultural mapping, local archives and folklore. She explores the controversies surrounding water ownership and management, and the social and political questions raised by water privatization in the UK.The topical nature of these issues and their global relevance make this book a vital contribution to contemporary research on water and an essential read for anyone with an interest in getting under the surface of one of the worlds most important social and environmental issues.

    • Social Science

Media, Anthropology and Public Engagement


Author: Sarah Pink,Simone Abram
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782388478
Category: Social Science
Page: 236
View: 2403
Contemporary anthropology is done in a world where social and digital media are playing an increasingly significant role, where anthropological and arts practices are often intertwined in museum and public intervention contexts, and where anthropologists are encouraged to engage with mass media. Because anthropologists are often expected and inspired to ensure their work engages with public issues, these opportunities to disseminate work in new ways and to new publics simultaneously create challenges as anthropologists move their practice into unfamiliar collaborative domains and expose their research to new forms of scrutiny. In this volume, contributors question whether a fresh public anthropology is emerging through these new practices.

    • Social Science

Anthropology

A Beginner's Guide
Author: Joy Hendry,Simon Underdown
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
ISBN: 1780741170
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 2723
In this illuminating tour of humanity, Joy Hendry and Simon Underdown reveal the origins of our species, and the fabric of human society, through the discipline of anthropology. Via fascinating case studies and discoveries, they unravel our understanding of human behaviours and beliefs, including how witchcraft has been used to justify misfortune, and debunk old-fashioned ideas about “race” based upon the latest genetic research. They even share what our bathroom tells us about our concept of the body – and ourselves. From our evolutionary ancestors, through our rites of passage, to our responses to globalization, Hendry and Underdown provide the essential first step to understanding the world as an anthropologist would – in all its diversity and commonality.

    • Social Science

Studying Those who Study Us

An Anthropologist in the World of Artificial Intelligence
Author: Diana Forsythe
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804742030
Category: Social Science
Page: 242
View: 463
Diana E. Forsythe was a leading anthropologist of science, technology, and work who pioneered the field of the anthropology of artificial intelligence. This volume collects her best-known essays, along with other major works that remained unpublished upon her death in 1997. It is also an exemplar of how reflexive ethnography should be done.

    • Education

My Freshman Year

What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student
Author: Rebekah Nathan
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780143037477
Category: Education
Page: 186
View: 5789
Feeling out of touch with her students, an anthropology professor describes how she enrolled as a freshman student at college in order to gain new insight into modern-day undergraduate culture. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

    • Political Science

Anthropology and Political Science

A Convergent Approach
Author: Myron J. Aronoff,Jan Kubik
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 085745725X
Category: Political Science
Page: 341
View: 5642
What can anthropology and political science learn from each other? The authors argue that collaboration, particularly in the area of concepts and methodologies, is tremendously beneficial for both disciplines, though they also deal with some troubling aspects of the relationship. Focusing on the influence of anthropology on political science, the book examines the basic assumptions the practitioners of each discipline make about the nature of social and political reality, compares some of the key concepts each field employs, and provides an extensive review of the basic methods of research that "bridge" both disciplines: ethnography and case study. Through ethnography (participant observation), reliance on extended case studies, and the use of "anthropological" concepts and sensibilities, a greater understanding of some of the most challenging issues of the day can be gained. For example, political anthropology challenges the illusion of the "autonomy of the political" assumed by political science to characterize so-called modern societies. Several chapters include a cross-disciplinary analysis of key concepts and issues: political culture, political ritual, the politics of collective identity, democratization in divided societies, conflict resolution, civil society, and the politics of post-Communist transformations.

    • Social Science

The Anthropology of Sustainability

Beyond Development and Progress
Author: Marc Brightman,Jerome Lewis
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137566361
Category: Social Science
Page: 316
View: 9388
This book compiles research from leading experts in the social, behavioral, and cultural dimensions of sustainability, as well as local and global understandings of the concept, and on lived practices around the world. It contains studies focusing on ways of living, acting, and thinking which claim to favor the local and global ecological systems of which we are a part, and on which we depend for survival. The concept of sustainability as a product of concern about global environmental degradation, rising social inequalities, and dispossession is presented as a key concept. The contributors explore the opportunities to engage with questions of sustainability and to redefine the concept of sustainability in anthropological terms.

    • Social Science

Ownership and Appropriation


Author: Veronica Strang,Mark Busse
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 1847888402
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 8892
Through detailed case studies covering a wide range of related issues, Ownership and Appropriation provides a new approach to this key anthropological topic.

    • Religion

The Anthropology of Religious Conversion


Author: Andrew Buckser,Stephen D. Glazier
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742517783
Category: Religion
Page: 236
View: 7145
This text paints a picture of conversion far more complex than its customary image in anthropology and religious studies.

    • Social Science

The Anthropological Lens

Harsh Light, Soft Focus
Author: James L. Peacock
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521004596
Category: Social Science
Page: 156
View: 7887
A revised version covers new topics and reflects recent changes in perspective and language.

    • Social Science

In the Event

Toward an Anthropology of Generic Moments
Author: Lotte Meinert,Bruce Kapferer
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782388907
Category: Social Science
Page: 186
View: 5450
Events are "generative moments" in at least three senses: events are created by and condense larger-scale social structures; as moments, they spark and give rise to new social processes; in themselves, events may also serve to analyze social situations and relationships. Based on ethnographic studies from around the world-varying from rituals and meetings over protests and conflicts to natural disasters and management-this volume analyzes generative moments through events that hold the key to understanding larger social situations. These events-including the Ashura ritual in Bahrain, social cleavages in South Africa, a Buddhist cave in Nepal, drought in Burkina Faso, an earthquake in Pakistan, the cartoon crisis in Denmark, corporate management at Bang & Olufsen, protest meetings in Europe, and flooding and urban citizenship in Mozambique-are not simply destructive disasters, crises, and conflicts, but also generative and constitutive of the social.

    • Juvenile Nonfiction

Anthropologist

Scientist of the People
Author: Mary Batten,A. Magdalena Hurtado,Kim Hill
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0618083685
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 64
View: 5177
Describes the daily lives and customs of the Achâe people, one of the few hunter-gatherers societies left in the world, based on the studies of anthropologist Magdalena Hurtado.

    • Social Science

The Innocent Anthropologist

Notes from a Mud Hut
Author: Nigel Barley
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 1478631023
Category: Social Science
Page: 190
View: 8707
When British anthropologist Nigel Barley set up home among the Dowayo people in northern Cameroon, he knew how fieldwork should be conducted. Unfortunately, nobody had told the Dowayo. His compulsive, witty account of first fieldwork offers a wonderfully inspiring introduction to the real life of a cultural anthropologist doing research in a Third World area. Both touching and hilarious, Barley’s unconventional story—in which he survived boredom, hostility, disaster, and illness—addresses many critical issues in anthropology and in fieldwork.

    • Science

How Forests Think

Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human
Author: Eduardo Kohn
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520276108
Category: Science
Page: 267
View: 1200
Can forests think? Do dogs dream? In this astonishing book, Eduardo Kohn challenges the very foundations of anthropology, calling into question our central assumptions about what it means to be human—and thus distinct from all other life forms. Based on four years of fieldwork among the Runa of Ecuador’s Upper Amazon, Eduardo Kohn draws on his rich ethnography to explore how Amazonians interact with the many creatures that inhabit one of the world’s most complex ecosystems. Whether or not we recognize it, our anthropological tools hinge on those capacities that make us distinctly human. However, when we turn our ethnographic attention to how we relate to other kinds of beings, these tools (which have the effect of divorcing us from the rest of the world) break down. How Forests Think seizes on this breakdown as an opportunity. Avoiding reductionistic solutions, and without losing sight of how our lives and those of others are caught up in the moral webs we humans spin, this book skillfully fashions new kinds of conceptual tools from the strange and unexpected properties of the living world itself. In this groundbreaking work, Kohn takes anthropology in a new and exciting direction–one that offers a more capacious way to think about the world we share with other kinds of beings.

    • Social Science

Available Light

Anthropological Reflections on Philosophical Topics
Author: Clifford Geertz
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400823404
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 1562
Clifford Geertz, one of the most influential thinkers of our time, here discusses some of the most urgent issues facing intellectuals today. In this collection of personal and revealing essays, he explores the nature of his anthropological work in relation to a broader public, serving as the foremost spokesperson of his generation of scholars, those who came of age after World War II. His reflections are written in a style that both entertains and disconcerts, as they engage us in topics ranging from moral relativism to the relationship between cultural and psychological differences, from the diversity and tension among activist faiths to "ethnic conflict" in today's politics. Geertz, who once considered a career in philosophy, begins by explaining how he got swept into the revolutionary movement of symbolic anthropology. At that point, his work began to encompass not only the ethnography of groups in Southeast Asia and North Africa, but also the study of how meaning is made in all cultures--or, to use his phrase, to explore the "frames of meaning" in which people everywhere live out their lives. His philosophical orientation helped him to establish the role of anthropology within broader intellectual circles and led him to address the work of such leading thinkers as Charles Taylor, Thomas Kuhn, William James, and Jerome Bruner. In this volume, Geertz comments on their work as he explores questions in political philosophy, psychology, and religion that have intrigued him throughout his career but that now hold particular relevance in light of postmodernist thinking and multiculturalism. Available Light offers insightful discussions of concepts such as nation, identity, country, and self, with a reminder that like symbols in general, their meanings are not categorically fixed but grow and change through time and place. This book treats the reader to an analysis of the American intellectual climate by someone who did much to shape it. One can read Available Light both for its revelation of public culture in its dynamic, evolving forms and for the story it tells about the remarkable adventures of an innovator during the "golden years" of American academia.

    • Social Science

Reclaiming a Scientific Anthropology


Author: Lawrence A. Kuznar, Indiana University - Purdue University, Fort Wayne
Publisher: AltaMira Press
ISBN: 0759112347
Category: Social Science
Page: 266
View: 1916
Lawrence Kuznar makes a compelling case that it is even more important today, a decade after the publication of the first edition of Reclaiming a Scientific Anthropology, for anthropology to return to its roots in empirical science.

    • Social Science

An Introduction to Social Anthropology

Sharing Our Worlds
Author: Joy Hendry
Publisher: Palgrave
ISBN: 1137431555
Category: Social Science
Page: 392
View: 6007
An Introduction to Social Anthropology opens up the field of social and cultural anthropology, demonstrating its value for building an understanding of the vast diversity of human societies and cultures that make up the world today. Without assuming any prior knowledge, the book gradually leads the reader from some of the discipline's earliest foundational approaches and theories, through the fundamental areas that make up contemporary anthropology. Taking a truly global and holistic view, it includes case studies from far away as well as closer to home, wherever you might be reading it, touching on a range of topics that both divide and connect us, such as family, marriage and religion. This third edition closes with a new chapter discussing the role of social and cultural anthropologists and the specific methods they use in a fast-changing world. This is an inviting, engaging and enjoyable text that aims to smooth the journey for new or prospective anthropology students seeking to better understand the discipline and its roots. Offering illustrations, plentiful further readings and films, first-hand accounts of people across the world, and a number of thorny topics for reflection, the book makes an ideal text for sharing and discussing in the classroom too.